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Digging Deep

Ben Knight and the Welldiggers have stories to tell on their debut album, Divining Rod

1 Comment · Wednesday, November 6, 2013
Ben Knight and the Welldiggers play American music. Kentucky Country music. A noble homage to generations of toil and progress. The songs on the Cincinnati band’s debut release, Divining Rod, are a frighteningly intimate introduction to Ben Knight, the storyteller. He and the Welldiggers earnestly compose new and original tunes that catch your attention with equal parts nostalgia and intrigue.  

Taste the Moonbow

Heavy Northern Kentucky rockers Moonbow release anticipated debut album

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 30, 2013
With their singer finished with his run on TV's Survivor and the rest of the members' schedules aligning, The End of Time, the debut full-length from heavy Northern Kentucky band Moonbow, is finally released.  

Distant Correspondent

Nov. 4 • Mayday

0 Comments · Monday, October 28, 2013
 Distant Correspondent has been described as “wintery,” “moody,” and “Joy Division if Ian Curtis had been on antidepressants,” all of which are appropriately applicable to the band’s darkly cinematic ‘70s-to-now soundscapes.   

Matt Wertz

Nov. 3 • 20th Century Theater

0 Comments · Monday, October 28, 2013
 Wertz’s music can be described in two words: Mom Rock. He falls in line with guys like Matt Nathanson and Gavin Degraw (both former tour mates). It’s the kind of Lite FM sound that only works on people in love or people who are waiting for their rom-com moment.   

Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion

Nov. 1 • MOTR Pub

0 Comments · Monday, October 28, 2013
Sarah Lee Guthrie did not begin to take music seriously until she met her now-husband, Irion, whose own lineage includes literary giant John Steinbeck, his great uncle. The duo has been touring and recording music since 1999.    

Freedy Johnston

Oct. 30 • MOTR Pub

0 Comments · Monday, October 28, 2013
 There are few better examples of the injustice of the term “one-hit wonder” than Freedy Johnston. Although he fits the description with his lone hit single, 1994’s “Bad Reputation,” his output before and after his one ubiquitous smash has been every bit as deserving of commercial acceptance.   

Rusko

Oct. 30 • Bogart's

0 Comments · Monday, October 21, 2013
 With his shorn sides/unkempt mop top haircut and defiantly Punk energy, Rusko has the period look of one of Ian Dury’s Blockheads circa New Boots and Panties. But his birth in 1985 places him in a different musical context entirely.    

Tech N9ne

Oct. 27 • Bogart's

0 Comments · Monday, October 21, 2013
Rolling Stone recently dubbed Tech N9ne “the hardest-working rapper,” and this calendar year is potent proof of that assertion.     

Valerie June

Oct. 24 • Southgate House Revival

0 Comments · Monday, October 21, 2013
 If you think of Americana music as a delicious home-cooked stew of Blues, Soul, Country, Folk, Gospel, acoustic-guitar meditation and funky Rock reverie, then you’ll have an idea of what to expect from Valerie June.    
by Mike Breen 10.22.2013
Posted In: Local Music, Music Commentary, Reviews at 04:02 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
short_takes_dark_colour

REVIEW: Dark Colour - 'Prisoner'

In Electronic music, the punkish encouragement to “just jump in and see what happens,” regardless of proficiency, resulted in the creation of Krautrock, Hip Hop, Synthpop, New Wave and many other styles. Some of the top innovators of those genres were driven by a “naïvite” that added a more “human” element (going against the common critique that all Electronic music is cold and robotic). Today, with the hugely increased access to affordable tools to create Electronic music, that more exploratory approach is back and thriving, resulting in innumerable subgenres and an unending stream of adventurous bedroom artists. Cincinnati’s Randall Rigdon, Jr., is one of those bedroom maestros. Using the name Dark Colour (fleshed out with other musicians in a live setting), Rigdon doesn’t let all of those subgenres distract him, instead embracing a variety of Electro styles and putting them together in his own personalized way. The results are delectable. Dark Colour’s recent full-length debut, Prisoner, is reminiscent of hearing things like New Order, LCD Soundsystem, MGMT or Neon Indian for the first time. Rigdon has solid writing and lyrical skills, but it’s the multi-hued textures, kaleidoscopic array of synth sounds, endearing beats and a shifting ambiance (showcasing his deft ability to create distinct moods) that set Dark Colour apart from the EDM pack. Prisoner (which follows 2011's debut EP, Memories, a release that was pulled from shelves after a dispute over an uncleared sample) ranges from Ambient dreamscapes and artsy Indie Electronica to funky Chillwave and bubbling Electro Pop, with many tracks containing multiple elements of each. Frequently slathered with a trippy glaze of effects, Rigdon’s melodies are most often delivered in either a hushed, spectral murmur or a whirling falsetto, while the eclectic, always-danceable beats have a surprisingly live feel, even when resembling something conjured from an ancient drum machine. There’s also a refreshing lack of current dancefloor trends; not that it would kill the album, but dropping in a grinding Dubstep groove, for example, would totally break its often hypnotic spell.On Prisoner, Dark Colour makes digital music with an analog heart, instantly catchy Electro Art Pop that never panders and frequently surprises. Learn more about Dark Colour here and give a listen to Prisoner below.Prisoner by Dark Colour
 
 

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