WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Bobaflex

Saturday • Northern Kentucky Convention Center

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 1, 2014
Metallers Bobaflex's most recent recording is last fall’s self-released and short but shredding Charlatan’s Web, featuring the leering Kiss-meets-Van Halen “School for Young Ladies” and the my-fist-your-cold-face dirge/anthem “I’m Glad You’re Dead.”  

Twenty One Pilots with Juicy J, NONONO and Hunter Hunted

Saturday • Fifth Third Arena

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 1, 2014
Twenty One Pilots’ fervent fan base radiates outward from their Columbus headquarters, so it’s no surprise that the faithful showed up in full force for 2012 Bunbury Music Festival in Cincinnati like a mellow Mongol hoard.  

No Haters, All SKATERS

NYC’s SKATERS integrate their grassroots Pop/Punk ethic into the major label paradigm

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 26, 2014
Though still hands-on in most aspects of their career, New York City buzz band SKATERS welcomed the broader reach afforded by their contract with Warner Brothers Records.    

The Band of Heathens with Josh Eagle

Friday • Ballroom at the Taft Theatre

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 26, 2014
While Austin, Texas’ South by Southwest extravaganza continues to jump the shark due to corporate excess and misdirection, the capitol city continues to be an exceptional music town. The Band of Heathens came out of Austin’s rich music scene with a lot of buzz in the mid-’00s.   

Run Boy Run

Thursday • Southgate House Revival (Lounge)

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 26, 2014
Young Arizona Roots/Bluegrass quintet Run Boy Run clearly has a reverence for what’s come before them — most of them grew up in musical families connected to the Arizona Bluegrass scene. But the subtly integrated elements of Classical music, Jazz and Pop give the group enough of a slant that they are often dubbed a “progressive” act.   

Corina Corina and Abiyah

Friday • Northside Tavern

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 26, 2014
Veteran, multifaceted Cincinnati Hip Hop artist/promoter Abiyah has teamed up with Brooklyn, N.Y.’s R&B/Hip Hop vocalist Corina Corina (whose latest album, The Free Way, was just released) for a two-week jaunt through the East Coast and Midwest, which began on Corina’s turf in mid-March and comes to Abiyah’s home base this week.   

Johnette Napolitano

Thursday • Southgate House Revival (Sanctuary)

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 26, 2014
It seems almost unfathomable, but Johnette Napolitano has been a musical fixture for over three decades, with her pummeling bass style, distinctive and alluring dusky vocal rasp and an almost Zelig-like knack for aligning herself with some of Rock’s more prominent personalities.   

New Bums with Pete Fosco

Thursday • MOTR Pub

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 26, 2014
Ben Chasny and Donovan Quinn, doing business as New Bums, are the sound of Bob Dylan and Neil Young raised as brothers on the mean streets of New York, singing dark songs of contemporary survival and busking for change with a cardboard sign that reads “Paul Westerberg Relief Fund,” although they’re spending the money on 40s and weed.   
by Jason Gargano 03.21.2014
Posted In: Live Music, Music News, Interview, Festivals at 09:05 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
img_8139adj

Louis Langrée Talks MusicNOW

CSO's new music director talks collaboration with nine-year-old MusicNOW fest

Louis Langrée is well aware of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra's rich history. The CSO's freshly minted music director also knows part of that history includes the nurturing of contemporary composers and their often unconventional works.  Enter MusicNOW, Bryce Dessner's 9-year-old festival of adventurous sounds. (Read our conversation with Dessner here.) This year's sonic extravaganza includes the CSO's take on new pieces by such esteemed composers as Nico Muhly and David Lang, as well as the title work from Dessner's new Classical album, St. Carolyn by the Sea. CityBeat recently connected with the genial Langrée — who spoke in self-described "primitive" English by phone from Paris — to discuss the CSO's collaboration with MusicNOW.    CityBeat: Before we get into MusicNOW, I'm curious about your initial impressions of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. Why were you interested in coming on as music director? Louis Langrée: The fame the orchestra is really big. Everybody knows it's a major orchestra. But then making music with them was a completely different experience because, yes, they have the qualities of all major American orchestras — precision, clarity of the attack of the situation. But they have also from their heritage, in their DNA, this German conception of sound, that you build the sound from the base of the harmony. That means the density of the sound is something absolutely remarkable, and that's rare in the United States. I think it has to do with the tradition, the roots, of this orchestra and also, of course, about the quality and the spirit of the musicians, which is really wonderful.  CB: Why were you interested in collaborating with MusicNOW and taking on a festival of contemporary music? LL: One of the strengths of the orchestra is to have supported and commissioned and performed contemporary music from their very early age. Having given the American premiere Mahler Third, Mahler Fifth, Stravinsky coming to Cincinnati before he was considered a giant, having premiered (Aaron Copland's ) "Lincoln Portrait," having commissioned (Copland's) "Fanfare for a Common Man" and many other pieces and many more recent pieces. That's why I wanted to open my tenure as music director with eighth blackbird and Jennifer Higdon concerto piece. It shows that we should support, play, commission and perform contemporary music — and, of course, contemporary American music.  CB: What was it like collaborating with Bryce? LL: Meeting Bryce was a wonderful. His French is perfect. Especially compared to my primitive English. (Laughs). I like his attitude in making music and experimentation. And any strong institution should be also a place of experimentation. Music is not something you put in a museum. It's alive. And then we should perform contemporary music like Classical music and perform Beethoven music, not forgetting that he only composed contemporary music. All the composers — Mozart, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Bartok — composed contemporary music, so we have to continue it. He's very focused and concentrated, but on the other hand the spectrum was quite bright. I think we have arrived on wonderful programs — very challenging, but very exciting.  CB: What makes him unique as a composer? LL: He knows how to make an orchestra sound. It's a very clear and precise writing but at the same time there is so much flexibility in the variations of colors written and the flow of the music. It's always quite exciting to study a piece and hear it. Having the privilege of working with the composer is something wonderful because there are so many questions I would like to ask of Beethoven and Tchaikovsky, and of course it's impossible. So being able to ask the composer and to hear his answers is just wonderful.  Bryce is someone who has great harmonic taste, and I think for the orchestra it's wonderful because you can express yourself much easier. I think he's very much like his music — a very welcoming man, a very open, very luminous person. I see that in his music, which is not always the case with composers. With him, I get the feeling he's one with his music.  CB: How has the orchestra responded to playing these new, sometimes challenging pieces? LL: Any new piece you don't know what to expect. What I've found is that these musicians are very open-minded, they are very generous and positive in their attitude and are eager to try any new experience. It's a privilege to perform these two concerts of new music, but it's also very challenging, so you have to be very practical.  CB: And what's the experience been like for you? LL: It's a great responsibility when you conduct a piece, but it's also a great privilege that today's major American composers are willing to write for us. To be sharing this experiment and experience in concert, to be a part of MusicNOW, is really something beautiful. MusicNOW's 2014 festival begins tonight and continues tomorrow. Visit musicnowfestival.org for tickets and full programming details.
 
 

Peach Kelli Pop with Bummer’s Eve and Black Planet

Wednesday • The Comet

0 Comments · Monday, March 17, 2014
Getting her start playing drums with Canadian Garage Pop trio The White Wires, Allie Hanlon began Peach Kelli Pop as a solo outlet for her own songwriting. Peach Kelli Pop (Hanlon does all of the recording and friends join her on the road) is modeled after some of the classics of vintage Pop music.   

0|9
 
Close
Close
Close