WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Superheaven (formerly Daylight) with Sheet Ghost, Chalk and Armslength

Thursday • Southgate House Revival

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 28, 2014
Just a few weeks ago, Daylight was out on the road with Bayside, Four Year Strong and Cincinnati’s very own Mixtapes, tearing things up good and proper and getting great notices for their efforts. Apparently, lawyers were paying particular attention, as well.    

Blitzen Trapper with The Parkington Sisters

Monday • Southgate House Revival

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 28, 2014
“Feel the Chill,” the first song on Blitzen Trapper’s latest, 2013’s succinctly titled VII, finds the Portland, Ore., outfit in new territory — it sounds like Kid Rock doing Mellow Gold-era Beck covers, its funky beats, harmonica flourishes and Southern-fried guitar lines almost enough to inspire dance-floor movement.  

Annie Sellick

Thursday and Friday • Blue Wisp Jazz Club

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 28, 2014
Talented Jazz vocalist Annie Sellick returns to Cincinnati this week for three shows at the Blue Wisp with her trio (drummer Chris Brown, bassist Jerry Navarro and pianist Chris Walters).   

Kid Ink with King Los and Bizzy Crook

Saturday • Bogart’s

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 28, 2014
Early last year, Kid Ink signed with RCA which resulted in a flurry of activity, including his slamming singles “Bad Ass” and “Money and the Power” from his well-received EP Almost Home.   

Dawes with Conor Oberst

Tuesday • Taft Theatre

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 21, 2014
Dawes is back! Why? I’m sure there are legitimate reasons for their tour, but I’m going to wager that it’s mostly just because they love Cincinnati so much. (Oh, and they're backing tourmate Conor Oberst during his headlining set.)   

Glue with Durazzo and AF the Naysayer

Friday • Mayday

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 21, 2014
Indie Hip Hop supergroup Glue hasn’t performed in more than five years, but on Friday two-thirds of the crew will reassemble for a Glue reunion show in Northside.   

Conor Oberst with Dawes

Tuesday • Taft Theatre

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 21, 2014
Conor Oberst burst out of his Omaha, Neb., bedroom seemingly fully formed, a precocious teen armed with a verbose vocabulary and enough emotion to make The Cure look stoic by comparison.   

Royal Southern Brotherhood with The Dallas Moore Band

Tuesday • Southgate House Revival

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 21, 2014
Supergroups are problematic in that egos and talent levels tend to cancel each other out, and musical combinations that sound good in theory often implode in the execution phase. The other musical construct that can be fraught with its own particular series of pitfalls is the musician-carrying-on-the-family-name scenario. Royal Southern Brotherhood would seem to be flying in the face of a boatload of potential negatives as their lineup reflects both  situations.   

Grieves with SonReal

Wednesday • 20th Century Theatre

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 21, 2014
The cover of Grieves’ fourth full-length album, Winter & the Wolves, features the Seattle-based rapper standing in a wintery landscape, his black-clad frame engulfed by snow and ice. He’s holding a pickaxe, as if ready to take on whatever challenge might come his way. It’s a curious cover art choice in a Hip Hop world often bound by conformity.   
by Nick Grever 05.19.2014
Posted In: Live Music, Reviews at 12:53 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
soundadvice_alice_in_chains_photo_ johnny buzzerio.widea

REVIEW: Alice in Chains at Horseshoe Casino Cincinnati

The gods of Rock must have known that Alice In Chains was in town on Saturday, May 17 as the area around the Horseshoe Casino was dreary, cloudy and cold. It’s as if they transplanted a little bit of Seattle into downtown Cincinnati for much of the day. Luckily the rain held off for the show, allowing the sold-out crowd to bear witness to a classic Grunge act proving just how energetic and relevant they still are.Canadian quartet Monster Truck kicked off the show before the advertised 8 p.m. show time, meaning a large number of fans missed out on much of the band’s set. But the fans that did get to catch Monster Truck’s Southern-fried Rock were in for a treat. These denim-clad and bearded boys sound like they’re from Georgia more than Ontario, playing rippers that would make Lynyrd Skynyrd raise their beers to the sky. Monster Truck’s shirts read in big, block letters: “Don’t Fuck With The Truck.” After their set, I doubt anybody considered doing so.Monster Truck’s set was a great warm up for the main attraction, but the crowd was really there for one reason and one reason only. At 8 p.m. sharp, as the opening lines to “Them Bones” rumbled through the stacks, Alice In Chains stormed the stage to prove exactly why they can still sell out venues almost 30 years after their formation. Vocalist/guitarist William DuVall (who joined the group after original frontman Layne Staley’s death in 2002) brings a constant energy and dynamic stage presence that revitalizes not only the crowd but his own bandmates. Bassist Mike Inez and guitarist/vocalist Jerry Cantrell became visibly more active and engaged whenever DuVall entered their stage space.This isn’t to say that the old school members were slacking. Inez and drummer Sean Kinney still banged out rhythms that probably made the Horseshoe’s windows quake a bit. And Cantrell plays the hell out of his guitar, playing through Alice In Chains’ iconic riffs with such power and intensity, it’s obvious that his newfangled haircut didn’t cause a Metallica-esque loss in Metal credibility.The set featured a mix of classics like “Man in the Box” and “Rooster,” deep cuts and hits from the DuVall albums like “Check My Brain,” insuring that fans of all eras happy. Even casual fans such as myself (my set list notes have more question marks than actual song titles) had plenty to latch on and sing along to. The trio banged out each song so powerfully that even unfamiliar tracks came across as timeless classics.The band’s interaction with fans is particularly notable as well. DuVall made efforts to point out fans who were truly enjoying the show, Cantrell invited a father and son up on stage because of the child’s enthusiasm in the front row and Kinney had the crowd call a lawyer’s office whose billboard was in his sight line for the entire performance. Judging by all the screens floating in the air, I feel bad for their receptionist.As the show wound down and Alice In Chains played their encore, consisting of “Don’t Follow,” “No Excuses,” and “Would?” the crowd slowly filed out and were greeted by a group of religious protesters touting the dangers of gambling and Rock & Roll (sex and drugs were noticeably absent from their complaints). They were largely ignored but after the hour and a half concert experience that I’d just been a part of, all I felt was a bit of pity for them. They missed one hell of a show.  The air may have been Seattle cold but after almost three decades and five albums, Alice In Chains are still white hot.
 
 

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