WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Hannah McCartney 03.13.2012
at 02:28 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
plastic bottle cap art

Rumpke Now Accepts Plastic Lids

New rule will ease recycling process for many

Environmental nerds unite! In the past, recycling a plastic bottle has always required an extra step that sometimes-recyclers might not have known about; plastic bottle lids, such as those from pop or juice bottles, couldn't be recycled through traditional single-stream recycling. Rumpke Recycling sent out a press release Tuesday announcing that they'll now accept those lids as long as they're screwed onto the bottle. Lids on plastic bottles haven't been accepted by Rumpke Recycling in the past because the bottles' manufacturers simply hadn't found a use for the plastic. Molly Yeager, Corporate Communication Coordinator for Rumpke Recycling, says they're always searching for manufacturers that work to find new uses for their products post-use. "People have been asking about recycling plastic lids for a long time," says Yeager. "It's going to be really exciting to tell them that they can now." Before, a plastic lid tossed in a recycling bin would have to be manually sorted out and thrown in the trash. Now, manufactures that purchase plastic bottles from Rumpke will be converting the lids into new items, such as paint cans.  Here's what Rumpke says to do with your plastic bottles and lids: To ensure your plastic lids are recycled, follow these easy steps: 1. Empty the bottle. Bottles still containing liquid will not be recycled. 2. If possible, crush the bottle. Crushing the bottle helps remove any air from the container, which serves as a safety precaution when the bottles are baled and also helps bottles travel through the recycling process more efficiently. 3. Screw the lid back on the bottle. Detached lids may not be recovered. Wondering what else you can and can't recycle in your community? Click here.
 
 
by Hannah McCartney 02.09.2012
Posted In: Environment, Public Transit at 02:18 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cincistreetcar

Duke Reaches Standstill with City in Streetcar Talks

Duke Energy's approval and cooperation was considered to be essential in advancing the highly anticipated Cincinnati streetcar project, and Wednesday the company announced it isn't willing to cooperate. In a letter to Mayor Mark Mallory dated Feb. 8, Ohio and Kentucky Duke Energy President Julie Janson stated that Duke changed its mind after a year and a half of negotiations and that it wouldn't cooperate with the city's requests that Duke move utility lines downtown to make way for the streetcar's tracks. According to Janson's letter, the lines must be moved a minimum of eight feet from the edge of the streetcar before any progress can be made in the plan's implementation. Duke estimates that the relocation and replacement of the infrastructure would cost somewhere around $18.7 million, but City Manager Milton Dohoney said that estimate hadn't been verified by anyone else.

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by Hannah McCartney 02.08.2012
at 02:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
renewable-energy

A Greener Cincinnati? Energy Aggregation Explained

The Cincinnati City Council met on Monday to discuss the energy aggregation policy for the city, which, if implemented, could mean big changes in the way residents’ homes are powered. In the meeting, Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls introduced a motion outlining the possible use of renewable energy credits (RECs), also known as renewable energy certificates, through an energy aggregation program that could be put into place as soon as this June or July. The motion was passed unanimously by the Budget and Finance Committee, meaning that the city will be preparing to send out requests for proposal (RFPs) to power suppliers within the next few weeks. In November, Cincinnati voters overwhelmingly approved Issues 44 and 45, which gave the city the authority to negotiate aggregation purchase rates of natural gas and electricity for residents and businesses. Wondering what exactly energy aggregation is? In Ohio, communities are allowed to pool funds together and purchase natural gas and electricity as a group. Because a community pools together, that means it can access the lowest rates — think of it like a trip to Sam’s Club. The more you purchase of something at one time, the lower rate per unit you can access.

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by Hannah McCartney 02.06.2012
at 12:33 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
greenenergy

One Hundred Percent Renewable Energy in Cincinnati?

Today’s 1 p.m. meeting at City Hall could decide whether or not Cincinnati will be powered by 100 percent renewable energy as early as this summer. According to Urban Cincy, the approval could make Cincinnati “the largest city in the United States to have its energy supply come from 100 percent renewable resources,” and could be established without much of a cost difference to taxpayers. Cincinnati City Council is meeting to decide on how to move forward with the “Natural Gas Aggregation Program” and the “Electric Aggregation Program.” These programs, if approved, would automatically apply to all Cincinnati residents. In Ohio, local communities are allowed to pool together to buy natural gas and electricity and gain “buying power” to obtain the lowest possibly costs for the utilities.

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by Kevin Osborne 02.02.2012
 
 
handel

Morning News and Stuff

The big news breaking the Internets is that Susan G. Komen for the Cure, the nation’s leading breast cancer charity, is pulling its grants from Planned Parenthood affiliates. The charity gave about $680,000 last year and $580,000 in 2010, which is mostly used to provide free breast exams for low-income women.

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by Danny Cross 10.04.2011
Posted In: Environment, News, 2011 Election, Media, Technology, Science at 09:27 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
att

Morning News and Stuff

Cleveland officials are apparently trying to outlaw flash mobs, describing them as violent, unruly terrorizing of communities and family-friendly events. That's not how AT&T presents them in this cell phone commercial.

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Peter Seidel Forecasts the Future

Cincinnati author fast-forwards growth and global warming in 2045

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 29, 2009
Cincinnati author and architect Peter Seidel places his first novel, '2045: A Story of Our Future,' clearly in the tradition of dystopian fiction classics '1984' and 'Brave New World' and James Kunstler's recent 'World Made by Hand.' Seidel talks with CityBeat about his new book.  

Boehner on the Environment: Shit Happens

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 22, 2009
As Earth Day arrives once again, it's comforting to know that our political leaders are safeguarding the environment for future generations. Take U.S. Rep. John Boehner, the pride of Southwestern Ohio. He says the climate changes all the time, people breathe and cows do what they do. Hey, shit happens — literally — so stop worrying.  

Environmentally Responsible Dining

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 15, 2009
Owners of a new Pleasant Ridge eatery, The Loving Cafe, hope to help the environment by serving up tasty plant-based meals as a way for people to ease their dietary impact on the planet. Cafe team member Meghan Burke says agriculture — especially raising animals for food — has been identified as one of the leading causes of global warming  

Greening the Present and the Future

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 28, 2009
Amazingly, with all that ills the world today and the repeated missteps of the Bush administration leaving a wake of messes to clean up everywhere, President Obama says getting greener is a priority for our country. That hum you're hearing might be the collective sigh of green-conscious people everywhere coupled with the big one let out by Mother Earth herself.  

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