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Cultivating Connections

Deeper Roots Coffee brings excellence and community to Cincinnati from the heart of Central America

1 Comment · Wednesday, June 5, 2013
By building lasting relationships with producers, local coffee roasters are able to secure a high quality product straight from the source, which helps both sides avoid the economic problems that come with global distribution.    
by Maija Zummo 05.24.2013
at 01:50 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
todo_tasteofcincinnati_phototastewebsite

Blog Guide to Taste of Cincinnati

Great weather, mass food, mobile apps, etc.

Start summer off scrumptiously with the 35th annual Taste of Cincinnati — the nation's longest running culinary arts festival. Six blocks of Fifth Street (from Race to Broadway) will be filled with eats from dozens of local signature restaurants, including a Food Truck Alley on North Broadway, and continuous live entertainment from Saturday through Monday. To survive the extremely popular and packed weekend of feasting, drinking and dancing, you need to make a plan.  First, get a feel for what vendors and bands will be there. Find food vendors here and an entertainment schedule here. Food covers all appetites ranging from gyros at the Andy's Mediterranean Grille booth and Crab Rangoon at the Bangkok Bistro booth to pulled pork from City Barbeque and fig pizza from M Wood Fired Oven. You'll also find Cincinnati classics like LaRosa's, Mecklenburg Gardens, Pompilio's, Busken Bakery, Graeter's, Gold Star — the list goes on and on. There are more than 100 dishes to try, and a ton of beverage booths.  The Christian Moerlein Brewing Company — the official beer of Taste — will host a Moerlein Beer Garden on Fountain Square where you can gab brand-new styles and specialty craft beers like the Moerlein Original Golden Helles. There will also be booths from Barefoot Win, Bell's, Great Lakes and so many more.  Check out the map for where each vendor will be.Map: And then there's also an app for iPhone or for Android where you can make a schedule and strategize. Find restaurants, food, entertainment and create an agenda for your trip. And here's CityBeat Music Editor Mike Breen's preview of weekend music at the fest: Eat to the Beat. The weather is going to be amazing this weekend. You may want to bring an umbrella on Monday, but otherwise, it's an amazing weekend to be gorging yourself outside.Weather:Noon-midnight Saturday-Sunday; noon-9 p.m. Monday. Free. Fifth Street (Race to Broadway streets), Downtown, tasteofcincinnati.com.
 
 

Man From “Crippled Girl” Case Sues City

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 22, 2013
A Kentucky resident implicated in an incident that took place in May 2012 at a public Party in the Park event is now suing the city of Cincinnati.  

The Linguistics of Legislation

Reviewing the outdated, overly conservative and just plain funny laws still on the books

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 10, 2013
We decided to look into Ohio and Northern Kentucky laws to see if there was anything else totally absurd (possibly sexist) left in writing in the Ohio Revised Code/Cincinnati Municipal Code/other codes. And there was nothing too bizarre, but some of the laws’ requirements and wording are hilarious, incredibly obvious and/or idiotic.   

Welcome to the 2013 Best of Cincinnati Issue

Celebrating the best people, places and businesses and cool stuff from the past year

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 3, 2013
What seemed like an abundance of riches in 2011 feels a little light when compared to the progress Cincinnati made last year.   

The Church of Rock & Roll

The Southgate House Revival thrives in an unpolished yet brilliant new location

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 3, 2013
Last January, former Southgate House marketing director Morrella Raleigh felt she and her father Ross Raleigh would never find a new location for what had become one of the country’s highest profile and most original music venues.   

If You Build It, They Will Come

Newly renovated Washington Park hearkens Cincinnati's urban heyday

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 3, 2013
A couple of years ago, Washington Park wouldn’t have been much of a spot to have a picnic. In a few months, though, the fountains in the water park will be turned back on after a long winter and children will clamp their feet over the pop-up jets and watch the clear blue water trickle between their toes.  

Pale as a Ghost Sign

Nostalgically seeking the faded, painted advertising signs of decades past

4 Comments · Wednesday, April 3, 2013
Signs alluding to a now-defunct echo of the city’s past — known as “ghost signs” — are slowly being worn away by years of corrosion all around Cincinnati.   
by German Lopez 03.28.2013
Posted In: Budget, Parking, News at 10:43 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
downtown grocery

Judge Orders Permanent Injunction on Parking Plan

City may have to make cuts to balance 2014 budget

In a ruling today, Hamilton County Judge Robert Winkler said the city will have to allow for a referendum on the parking plan and imposed a permanent injunction pending the outcome of a referendum. The ruling means the city may be unable to rely on the parking plan to balance fiscal year 2014’s budget, and the city may be forced to find cuts elsewhere by July 1, when the new budget will kick in.The ruling may be appealed, but City Solicitor John Curp says he is not aware of any filing yet. He says Mayor Mark Mallory and the city administration plan to hold a press conference later this afternoon to discuss the ruling in further detail.For opponents of the parking plan, the ruling comes as a big victory that will allow them to put the parking plan on the ballot if they gather enough eligible petition signatures by April 5. For the city, the ruling potentially leaves a $25.8 million hole in the 2014 budget. When the restraining order was extended for two weeks on March 20, city spokesperson Meg Olberding told CityBeat the delays were causing the city to approach a “pressure point”: “We respect the court's right to do that (the extension), and know that every day that we cannot make the parking deal happen is a day that we are closer to having to lay people off.”In the past, City Manager Milton Dohoney Jr. said the plan will force the city to lay off 344 employees, including 80 firefighter and 189 police positions. But opponents argue there are ways to solve the budget without laying people off. As an alternative to the parking plan, Councilman Chris Seelbach proposed Plan S, which would redirect $7.5 million in casino revenue to help balance the deficit, cut $5 million based on the results of the city's priority-driven budgeting process and put two charter amendments on the ballot that, if approved, would include up to a $10-per-month trash fee and increase the city's admissions tax by 2 percent. City Council approved the parking plan on March 6 to lease the city’s parking assets to the Port of Greater Cincinnati Development Authority to help balance the budget for the next two fiscal years and fund more than $100 million in development projects, including the creation of a downtown grocery store and more than 300 luxury apartments ("Parking Stimulus," issue of Feb. 27). Opponents of the parking plan say they’re concerned the city will cede too much control over its parking assets and cause parking rates to skyrocket. The city says rate increases are initially capped at 3 percent or inflation — whichever is higher. But the rates can change with a unanimous vote from a special committee, approval from the city manager and a final nod from the Port Authority. The special committee would comprise of four people appointed by the Port Authority and one appointed by the city manager. The ruling comes after the city and opponents of the parking plan met in court on March 15 to discuss whether the plan is subject to referendum. Curt Hartmann, an attorney who represents the Coalition Opposed to Additional Spending and Taxes (COAST) and opponents of the parking plan, said the city charter is vague on its definition of emergency clauses, and legal precedent supports siding with voters’ right to referendum when there is ambiguity. The city cited state law to argue emergency clauses, which remove a 30-day waiting period on legislation, eliminate the possibility of referendum. Terry Nestor, who represented the city, said legal precedent requires the city to defer to state law as long as state law is not contradicted in the city charter. With his decision, Winkler sided with opponents of the parking plan. He wrote in the ruling, “If the people of Cincinnati had intended to exempt emergency legislation from their referendum powers, they could have done so when adopting Article II, Section 3 of the City Charter.” The parking plan is one of the few issues dividing Democratic mayoral candidates John Cranley and Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls. Cranley opposes the plan, while Qualls supports it.
 
 

W&S: Renovated Anna Louise Inn Would Discriminate Against Men

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 27, 2013
Financial giant Western & Southern last week accused city officials and other Anna Louise Inn advocates of repeatedly deceiving the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to obtain federal funds for the Inn’s long-awaited, $13 million renovation.    

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