WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Cock (Review)

Fighting for Love: 'Cock' at Know Theatre

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 17, 2013
Know Theatre has opted for quality rather than quantity in its productions this season. It’s following the highly regarded When the Rain Stops Falling with its second show, Cock by Mike Bartlett, maintaining a similar high level of material and performance  
by Rick Pender 04.12.2013
Posted In: Theater, Visual Art at 09:26 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
legallyblonde2

Stage Door: Controversy, Conversation and Comedy

Tonight (Friday) Know Theatre opens a new production of a work that's bound to launch a lot of conversations. And let's not beat around the bush: The real title of Mike Bartlett's play is Cock (The Cockfight Play is the substitute title for media that are afraid to offend). It's a tense comedy about sexual identity: John takes a break from his longtime boyfriend and unexpectedly falls in love with a woman. The story is about how he's caught in a tug-of-war between these two lovers, and the play's conflict is John's navigation of his sexuality and his selfhood. It's also told without scenery or props, focusing squarely on the relationships. According to Know's Eric Vosmeier, "It's a kind of pansexual love story that's told very simply without all the trappings of a traditional production." Vosmeier describes this production as "one of the first victories of Know's new scheduling model." The rights for Cock just became available; this is only the second American production of the play that premiered at London's Royal Court Theatre in 2009. The show runs through May 11. Box office: 513-300-5669 This weekend is the opener for Covedale Center's production of Legally Blonde, the show that kicked up controversy in a Loveland High School staging last fall that led to the firing of a dedicated director. I still shake my head over what could offend anyone about this PG rated piece of musical theater, but you can check it out and decide for yourself at the Covedale. It's about a young woman who won't take "no" for an answer and becomes her own woman in the process — outshining everyone at Harvard Law School. It's kind of crazy, but a lot of fun. No one will get fired over this one, I suspect. Box office: 513-241-6550 The Otto M. Budig Theatre at the Carnegie in Covington is in the midst of a run of Jason Robert Brown's Parade. My schedule and the theater's haven't matched up yet, but I'm eager to see it — I'm headed there for the Sunday matinee this weekend. Set in the sweltering intolerance of 1913 Atlanta, Parade is the story of Leo Frank, a northerner and Jewish factory manager, wrongfully accused of murdering a 13-year-old girl in his employment. Despite media frenzy and public outrage, his courageous wife struggles in vain to clear his name. The show won 1999 Tony Awards for best book and best score. This is an off-campus production by the musical theater program at UC's College-Conservatory of Music, and it's been given high marks by the judging panel from the League of Cincinnati Theatres: for the ensemble, for musical direction by Steve Goers, for featured actor Noah Ricketts and for lighting design by Alan Hanson and Wes Richter. It's onstage through April 21. Box office: 859-957-1940 Untethered Theater is midway through it's run of Jeff Daniels' Apartment 3A, presented at the Clifton Performance Theatre on Ludlow, a few blocks east of the Esquire. It's about a once idealistic young woman who has been disillusioned in just about every aspect of her life. The show is an exploration of faith and hope in today's world, described as "an uncynical play about cynics in cynical times." Through April 27. Tickets: 513-939-0599
 
 

The Book Club Play (Review)

Dynamic, fast-paced comedy flips tables on character studies

0 Comments · Friday, March 29, 2013
The Book Club Play  a comedy about five people with some personal history who come together for monthly conversations about books, progresses — perhaps more accurately, regresses — through a series of novels reflecting tastes, aspirations and differences.    

Seasons Greetings

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 26, 2013
Here are the ingredients: a couple of Broadway and off-Broadway hits, three world premieres, a lavish Jane Austen show, a classic musical by Kander and Ebb, an innovative drama with tap dancing and video, plus holiday festivities...   

A Midsummer's Night Dream (Review)

A dream of a comedy at Cincy Shakes

0 Comments · Monday, March 25, 2013
Cincinnati Shakespeare Company’s staging of A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a hilarious frolic through one of Shakespeare’s most beloved creations. A quirky, energetic reimagining, this production features all the familiar faces.  

Black Pearl Sings! (Review)

Two-person cast shines with heart and soul

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 20, 2013
In a broiling Texas summertime smack in the middle of the Great Depression, Susannah Mullally, a song collector from the Library of Congress, is just about to give up her day’s search when she hears a rich, expressive voice coming from somewhere down a prison hallway.   

Black Pearl Stings!

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 19, 2013
Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati’s Black Pearl Sings! is a play come as a warning shot foretelling the modern-day recording industry (such as it is) and its sad history of theft by corporate henchmen. More obviously and tellingly, the play is also a dance of race relations, race politics and the sometimes heartbreaking history of relationships between black and white women.   

The Language You Cry In

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 12, 2013
Playwright Frank Higgins began his writing career as a poet, so he pays careful attention to the way he puts words together. After some time working at poetry, he felt that his best pieces were stories about people.  

Oh, Yes We Got Trouble (with a capital T)

1 Comment · Wednesday, March 6, 2013
 Theater is a great, creative outlet for kids. Sonja Hansen’s efforts in Loveland inspired dozens of them and engaged their families in a wholesome, enjoyable extracurricular activity. Such undertakings are also learning experiences. Sadly, this lesson in repression over trivial matters sends a terrible message to students.   

Threepenny Opera (Review)

CCM shines with historical tale of corruption, greed

0 Comments · Friday, March 1, 2013
This CCM production is an engaging if sordid recreation of the creators’ intentions, a bravura performance that serves as a reminder of how theater can provide sharp social commentary. Bravo to Guarino and her student cast for this memorable production.   

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