WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Mike Breen 08.29.2014 86 days ago
Posted In: MidPoint Music Festival, Music News at 09:43 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
safe_image.php

MidPoint Music Festival Ticket Deal Ends Tuesday

Prices for three-day MPMF passes go up after Labor Day

Three-day “All Music Access” tickets for the 13th annual MidPoint Music Festival remain one of the best music fest deals in the country. But if you wait until after Monday to get yours, you’ll have to pay a little more. On Tuesday, prices for the three-day passes will increase from $69 to $79. It’ll still be a great deal with the $10 bump, but you like to save money, right? Click here to get your tickets, which will get you into all of the shows throughout the three-day affair (barring shows that reach capacity by the time you get there).The festival returns in less that a month, running Sept. 25-27 on multiple stages throughout Downtown and Over-the-Rhine and featuring more than 150 performers from all over the world. MPMF (which is owned and operated by CityBeat) has added a few acts over the past few weeks. Artists added to the lineup in just this past week include Nashville’s Mary Bragg, Columbus, Ohio’s Old Hundred, Stockholm, Sweden’s Baskery, returning MPMF faves Sol Cat (from Nashville), Louisiana’s Baby Bee and L.A. Pop band machineheart. You can keep track of further schedule changes at MPMF.com, as well as on the festival’s Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts.To check out some tunes from this year’s crop of MPMF artists, click below for a 10-and-a-half-hour Spotify playlist.
 
 

From Brazil With Love

Cincinnati Jazz pianist Phil DeGreg continues his long love affair with Brazilian musical tradition

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 27, 2014
Cincinnati Jazz pianist Phil DeGreg talks about his recently released third album of Brazilian Jazz exploration, Brazilian People, and the state of Jazz in Cincinnati and beyond.  

We Built This Old City

Piece by piece, Old City has come together to become one of Cincinnati’s sonic powerhouses

0 Comments · Tuesday, August 19, 2014
After issuing a trio of EPs since 2012 — originally on old school cassettes — and a live album back in January, the current incarnation of Cincinnati’s Old City concluded it was time for a proper full-length release.   
by Nick Grever 08.21.2014 94 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Reviews at 09:51 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
500 album cover

REVIEW: 500 Miles to Memphis’ ‘Stand There and Bleed’

Local rockers host listening party tonight for their finest effort to date

500 Miles to Memphis’ two most recent album releases are local classics that reside in two vastly different musical landscapes. Their 2007 album, Sunshine in a Shot Glass, offers 12 tracks of undiluted Country Punk. The album starts off with the band’s hit “All My Friends are Crazy” and doesn’t let up. The band’s followup, 2011’s We’ve Built Up to Nothing, took the Country Punk roots and drastically expanded on the concept. Influenced by The Beatles, the Cincinnati-based quintet added layer upon layer of instrumentation to craft an epic that radically expanded the groundwork laid in 2007.  Now, in 2014 the band is set to unleash Stand There and Bleed. With its latest release, 500 Miles to Memphis has pulled back and opted for a simpler, more straightforward group of songs. In doing so, the band has written its best album to date. The band will host a listening party for the new album tonight (Thursday) at The Drinkery in Over-the-Rhine. The album will be played in its entirety at 9 p.m., then the group will play an acoustic set at 10 p.m. The event is free. (The official release date for Stand There and Bleed has yet to be announced.) At its core, 500 Miles to Memphis has always been about vocalist/guitarist Ryan Malott telling the stories of his life. And with three years in between releases, Malott has plenty to talk about. Stand There and Bleed is Malott’s most personal output so far. We see a glimpse of tour life in “Medication,” the joys of marriage in “Takes Some Time” and the trials of addiction in “Easy Way Out.” Malott may have traded the bottle for coffee and a Playstation controller, but the struggle is ongoing. In fact, the best tracks on the album are the ones that document Malott’s missteps, but only because the album has so much hope, as well. There is a light at the end of the tunnel, and Malott is steadily working his way towards it. Joining Malott is bassist/vocalist Noah Sugarman, drummer Kevin Hogle, guitarist/vocalist Aaron Whalen and lap steel guitarist David Rhodes Brown. This all-star lineup compliments Malott’s lyrics expertly. Gone are We Built Up to Nothing’s more eccentric instrument choices; 500 stripped away the excess to more fully focus on what it had in house. The result is an album that’s more consistent and true to 500’s vision as a whole. Malott is influenced by Country and Punk Rock in equal measure and these influences come across stronger than ever on Bleed, with each member adding their own touch on the theme. Hogle’s drumming is still some of the best in town; his musical ear enables him to mold his style to each and heighten the mood of all. Brown’s steel playing on Stand There and Bleed keeps the more Punk-based tracks grounded in 500’s roots and elevates the Country tracks to another level with effortlessly delivered solos. Finally, Whalen and Sugarman’s guitar and bass inject energy throughout the record that reinforces Stand There and Bleed’s straightforward, powerful delivery. Malott’s vocal delivery has been honed and refined on Stand There and Bleed, as well. Malott is an unabashed fan of Green Day and comparisons to Billie Joe Armstrong in songs like “Bethel, OH” and “Abilene” are undeniable. Malott has also continued to inject large amounts of emotion into his vocals. He’s always been an expressive singer but the earnestness and pain in “You’ll Get Around” and “Alone” show a departure from We’ve Built Up to Nothing’s more polished vocals. Part of the recording process was breaking Malott of those good habits and getting him used to putting the feeling back into each take. What results is an album that’s a little rougher around the edges and much more emotionally captivating for the listener. 500 Miles to Memphis has been pushing its music forward for years, constantly hitting the road to share its take on Country Punk. The band has been virtuous to the genre and also bent it to an almost unrecognizable state. With Stand There and Bleed, the quintet has met somewhere in the middle. The band has trimmed the fat, focused on what each (incredibly talented) member brings to the table and built a record that is its most focused and honest to date.  The band has traveled way more than 500 miles to reach where they are now, but with albums like Stand There and Bleed carrying them, they have plenty more ahead of them.
 
 
by Mike Breen 08.20.2014 95 days ago
Posted In: MidPoint Music Festival, Live Music at 10:52 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
atlaspostertourfall2014

MidPoint Music Festival Announces Free Shows

Real Estate and others to perform on the free MidPoint Midway stage

Thanks to an assist from sponsor P&G, one of the more anticipated MidPoint Music Festival performances this year will be a special free “happy hour” concert.  Brooklyn Indie Rock group Real Estate will perform on the Midway stage the Friday of the fest (Sept. 26) at 6 p.m. Cincinnati faves The Yugos will kick the special event off at 5 p.m., with Arkansas’ Knox Hamilton, Nashville’s Colony House and others playing after Real Estate.The MidPoint Midway is the hub of various activities that runs along a blocked off portion of 12th Street in Over-the-Rhine (between Walnut and Vine streets). The strip has featured the popular “Box Truck Carnival” (the ArtWorks-helmed project will be replaced with a new project this year) and will again have lots of food and other cool/fun vendors. The Midway’s stage is free and open to music fans of all ages. On Thursday, Sept. 25, the outdoor stage will feature excellent local acts Automagik, Black Owls and Pike 27, plus Columbus, Ohio’s Indigo Wild. On Saturday, Sept. 27, the stage will host Cincinnati’s The Ready Stance, as well as Bailiff, Alex G, Low Cut Connie and Magnolia Sons. Music on the MidPoint Midway begins at 5 p.m. Sept. 25-26, and 6 p.m. on Sept. 27. For those who want to catch more than just the freebies, MPMF tickets are available here. The three-day, all-music-access passes are currently just $69; the price goes up to $79 after Sept. 1. 
 
 

Umin Celebrates Hypnotic New Release

Plus, Bummers Eve announce recording projects, UnityFest 2014 helps the homeless and Festival on the Lake showcases local music

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 13, 2014
ElectroAcoustic project umin celebrates a new full-length release, clast, Bummers Eve announce forthcoming recording projects, UnityFest 2014 helps the homeless and Alexandria's Festival on the Lake showcases local music.   

Trademark Aaron Releases EP, Plays Fountain Square

Plus, MidPoint announces its full schedule and the It's Commonly Jazz series begins

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 6, 2014
Northern Kentucky-based Hip Hop artists celebrates the release of his new EP, Act Accordingly, Saturday during the Beats by Self-Diploma concert on Fountain Square, the MidPoint Music Festival announces its full schedule and the free It's Commonly Jazz series kicks off with William Menefield this Thursday.   
by Mike Breen 08.06.2014 109 days ago
 
 
mpmf12-washingtonpark_jenniferdenham

MidPoint Music Festival's 2014 Schedule Unveiled

Late September fest adds new venues, more all-ages opportunities

This morning, the full schedule (with a few exceptions) for this year's MidPoint Music Festival, which returns to Cincy Sept. 25-27, was announced. You can start building your itinerary now here. This year's MPMF will remain centered around venues in the Over-the-Rhine and neighboring Downtown areas. A few new venues were announced — Memorial Hall, next to Music Hall, will be participating this year, as will the Christian Moerlein Brewery, which will feature showcases on a large outdoor stage (replacing the big-tent parking lot stage at Grammer's) and an indoor stage. MPMF 2014 will also offer under-drinking-age music lovers more opportunities to explore the festival than ever. The outdoor Moerlein Brewery stage, Memorial Hall, The Ballroom at the Taft Theatre, the MidPoint Midway, Washington Park and the Contemporary Arts Center will all be open to fans of all ages. Below is the full press release. Tickets are available now at mpmf.cincyticket.com. Stay tuned to MPMF.com (and corresponding social media pages) for the latest schedule additions and more.CINCINNATI, Ohio (August 6, 2014) — The long wait is over. Fans eager to see what artists are playing atMidPoint Music Festival will now find a full schedule online at MPMF.com. Approximately 150 acts from sevencountries, 57 cities, and across the tri-state region will perform in Cincinnati USA, September 25–27, 2014.For weeks now, festival organizers have been leaking some bands and details via social media, but venueand showcase times have been kept under wraps until today. All-access passes are on sale at mpmf.com forwhat is arguably the best music festival value in the nation.“We’ve always offered a wide array of music styles, but this year’s lineup has really developed into somethingspecial and diverse,” said Dan McCabe, creative director. “I think fans would be hard pressed to find anotherfestival that can give you a bigger bang for your buck.”Experience live music for three daysThe 13th annual festival will present three exciting days of live music on 14 stages in the Over-the-Rhine and Downtown neighborhoods. While the event maintains its status as a primary showcase for emerging independent talent, there’s no denying that this year’s edition has raised the bar in booking established artists.Cincinnati-music fans should take note that MidPoint welcomes one the most acclaimed local bands to break out in the 90s, The Afghan Whigs, who have stormed back better than ever with their first studio album in the past 16 years. MidPoint will be the only regional appearance for the band during their current world tour.MidPoint will also be the tour kickoff for Chromeo, the “funk lordz” from Toronto, who are contending for the song of the summer with their single Jealous (I ain’t with it). Washington Park should expect a dance party with the band’s huge lightshow. Consequence of Sound called them a “must-see live show for any festival.”Additionally, the festival will host some well-established names from the indie-music world over the past decade, including OK Go, The Raveonettes, Panda Bear, Sun Kil Moon and Joseph Arthur. Bands like Real Estate, St. Paul & the Broken Bones and Jessica Lea Mayfield are newer, but no less widely known.Longtime MidPoint fans might also notice a wider array of music styles. The lineup still features a healthyamount of pop and indie rock, but organizers have listened to fans’ suggestions, adding more:Country Nikki Lane, Margo & the Price Tags, Bulletville;Folk Lost in the Trees, Mutual Benefit, Woody Pines, Honey Locust, The Ridges;R&B St. Paul and the Broken Bones, Magnolia Sons, The Almighty Get Down;Blues Barrence Whitfield and the Savages, No Sinner, Left Lane Cruiser;Heavy Metal Deafheaven, Liturgy; as well as more dance-oriented sounds likeHip-hop/EDM Tycho, Dessa, WHY?, Body Language, and Parallels.Experience new venues for young and oldFestival venues continue to evolve with great new, larger stages at Memorial Hall and Christian Moerlein Brewery. Younger fans will able see more showcases than ever with all-ages stages at the Contemporary Arts Center, Taft Ballroom, Memorial Hall, the MidPoint Midway, Christian Moerlein Outdoor Stage and Washington Park. In fact, children under 10 years of age can attend our Washington Park showcases for free with a paying adult. With afternoon music programmed for Washington Park on Saturday that could be just what the doctor ordered for parents who seldom get out to concerts.Experience a unique festival atmosphereSince 2001, MidPoint's goal has been to help you discover your new favorite band. Our embrace of today'semerging artists is born of the same spirit employed by Cincinnati's celebrated musical pioneers, who alwaysreached for something new. This festival isn’t as much about the flavor-of-the-month, but rather atastemaker’s event where the bands performing will be what people are talking about next year.For three days, fans can walk easily between venues dotted throughout beautiful, resurgent Over-the-Rhine.This collection of young creative talent amongst an architecturally rich urban setting makes MidPoint a one-ofa-kind experience. Unlike some festivals on a farm or a huge fielded area that could be anywhere, MidPointcarries the heart of our city with intimate performances in smaller clubs and theaters. We think Cincinnati isone of the best music cities in the world. With MidPoint showcasing bands and our city’s center, we areputting our best foot forward towards showing this is a great place to live, work and play.Everything is on an upswing in Over-the-Rhine and Downtown Cincinnati and we expect the fans to not justenjoy the music, but the wonderfully reimagined Washington Park, our handsome German-heritage buildingsand all of the newer hip restaurants, cafés and hi-tech companies that are making this one of the hottestregions of the Midwest.Experience food and fun on the MidwayWe realize that not everyone can afford to attend a music festival, so we’ve tried to make a small part of itaccessible to everyone with our outdoor MidPoint Midway. All of the music programmed here is free, thanksin part to the help of festival sponsor P&G.The Midway takes up about two blocks on 12th Street in Over-the-Rhine. Fans at the Midway can find festivalessentials such as food and beer trucks, various vendors and the return of the artistic installations coordinatedwith the help of ArtWorks. (More on that in the coming weeks.)MidPoint’s box office is also at the Midway, where fans will purchase All-Access, VIP, or single-day passes.Bicycles encouragedIt is fairly easy to hop from show to show, but with 10 venues in Over-the-Rhine and four located downtown,not every showcase will be a quick walk. But it is a quick bike ride. Festival organizers will continue to partnerwith the City of Cincinnati to place a number of bike racks in strategic locations. We encourage everyone tosave their feet for the dance floor and bring their bike to get to those must-see bands faster.MidPoint Music Festival highlights to look for:Thursday September 25Chromeo; Panda Bear; St. Paul & the Broken Bones; Sun Kil Moon; Lost in the Trees; and Nikki LaneFriday September 26The Afghan Whigs; Tycho; Real Estate; Wussy; WHY?; Dessa; Rubblebucket; and Jessica Lea MayfieldSaturday September 27OK Go; The Raveonettes; Deafheaven; Empires; EMA; Earth; Saintseneca; and Speedy OrtizCincinnati USA represent:Automagik; Black Owls; Bulletville; Culture Queer; Darlene; Fathers; Fists of Love; Heavy Hinges; Honey &Houston; Honeyspiders; Injecting Strangers; Leggy; Molly Sullivan; Old City; Prim; Public; Smasherman; StateSong; The Afghan Whigs; The Almighty Get Down; The Ready Stance; Us, Today; WHY?; and WussyA full performance schedule is now online at MPMF.com/festival. All artists are subject to change withoutnotice. Schedule updates and further festival news will be available at MPMF.com, on Facebook and Twitter.2014 MIDPOINT MUSIC FESTIVAL VENUESArnolds Bar & Grill210 East Eighth StreetChristian Moerlein Brewery1621 Moore Street (2 stages)Contemporary Arts Center44 East Sixth Street (all ages)Bioré Stage at Know Theatre1120 Jackson Street (2 stages)Mainstay Rock Bar301 West Fifth StreetMemorial Hall1225 Elm Street (all ages)Midpoint Midway Presented by P&GTwelfth Street, between Vine & Walnut (all ages)MOTR Pub1345 Main StreetMr. Pitiful’s1323 Main StreetTaft Ballroom317 East Fifth Street (all ages)The Drinkery1150 Main StreetWashington Park Presented by Dewey’s Pizza1230 Elm Street (all ages)TICKETS ON SALE AT MPMF.COMAll-Access Pass $69 ($79 after September 1)VIP Pass $179Single-Day Pass $40 (Limited quantities)All venues will offer the option of À la carte pricing at the door, which covers that night at that venue.Entry into any MidPoint venue is subject to legal capacity limits. All-Access Pass holders get admission to allMidPoint showcases, all three days. VIP pass holders get an enhanced experience with the ability to skiplines with priority admission, plus they receive access to catered VIP reception events each evening, withcomplimentary food and beverages. An exclusive VIP viewing area is included at the Washington Park stage.
 
 

Electric Avenues

Cincinnati’s Electric Citizen takes a quick detour from the road to trumpet the release of its debut full-length

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 6, 2014
With international acclaim and relentless national touring, Heavy Cincinnati rockers Electric Citizen return home for a release party in honor of its debut full-length, Sateen.  
by Brian Baker 07.17.2014 129 days ago
Posted In: Live Stream, Festivals, Local Music at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
photo-credit-george-salisbury-extralarge_1404151529910

REVIEW: Bunbury Music Festival Day 3

Flaming Lips, The Yugos, Kim Taylor and more bring Bunbury 2014 to a close

Sideways rain and swamp-ass, but it wasn't so bad. The storms were intermittent, the day was clearly not a total washout and, out of the nine days of Bunbury over the past three years, this one might just have ended on the highest note of them all.Upon arrival, I was greeted by above-and-beyond volunteer Jacob Heintz, who advised serious attention to hydration, as several people had already passed out from the heat. In order to accommodate more fluids, I needed to make a deposit at the Yeatman's Cove First National Bank of Evacuation.You know what's great about the Porta-Kleens in the summer? Heated seats. You know what's not great about Porta-Kleens in the summer? Heated everything else. I felt like I was microwaved to about medium rare by the time I was done with business. But I was treated to a bit of pithy wisdom in the form of a neatly scrawled line of graffiti in the unit — "No one is free. Even the birds are chained to the sky." Of course, the trade-off is that birds can shit anywhere they like, which somehow seems to involve my windshield an inordinate number of times a week.At any rate, a spotty rain began within minutes of my arrival, so I headed down to the Main Stage to see if things were continuing on schedule. On the way, I passed Daniel in Stereo on the Acoustic Stage, where he seemed to be offering an evocative Jeff Buckley vibe. Very nice. When I got to the Main Stage, the Brick + Mortar set had just begun. The politically conscious World Rock guitar/drum duo from Toms River, N.J., was cooking along nicely, but about three songs in, the lightning flashed, the thunder cracked and the staff shut them down. "That sucks," noted guitarist/vocalist Brandon Asraf. "I had just tricked you into liking me for a minute." Then he launched into a stand-up comedy bit, quoting Half Baked and bemoaning his lack of life compared to his engaged drummer, John Tacon. "I'm single and chubby. What's up?" he said, canvassing the crowd. The crew finally had to shut off the power so that was the end of Brick + Mortar. (The band will return to Cincy on Aug. 15 for a free show on Fountain Square.)Shortly after that, the flaming finger of God erupted from multiple clouds and the rain, gentle at first, ultimately came pissing down from the heavens. I had taken refuge in the Yeatman's Cove tunnels and thought I'd gotten way lucky to avoid the torrential downpour, but that proved ineffective as well when a tornadic wind blew the rain horizontally straight through the passageway. Everyone was drenched from cowlick to ass-crack and beyond.Luckily, the storm didn't last long and the only issue at that point was how long the clean up and reset would take. I wandered down to the Main Stage to see if Red Wanting Blue was going to happen, but it appeared as though it would take a considerable amount of time, so I motored back down to the Warsteiner Stage to see what progress had been made there. To my unending delight, Kim Taylor was just getting started about the time she should have been wrapping up. I've been completely smitten with Kim's work since a friend at my long since defunct graphic design day job lived in the same apartment building with her. She had just begun her music career and had given my friend a copy of her self-released EP, which he passed along to me. Her gently compelling voice, her introspective and intelligent lyrics and her melancholic mastery of melody certainly gave me a chill similar to the one I felt after my first experience with Suzanne Vega, but Kim was most assuredly following a unique path, and so it has remained for the past decade and a half. I've seen Kim numerous times over the years and written at least three features and a few MidPoint previews ahead of her releases and appearances, and she never disappoints, as an interview or as an artist. The power of her presentation at Bunbury was obvious; with no more than her acoustic guitar and drummer Devon Ashley, Kim Taylor turned the vast expanse in front of the Warsteiner Stage into an intimate performance space that crackled with a quiet intensity. It is powerful testimony to Kim's ability to hold an audience that, with dark clouds roiling overhead and thunder rumbling ominously in the distance, there was even greater drama brewing on the Warsteiner Stage.After a quick stop to use the Big Mac Bridge as an umbrella, it was down to the Lawn Stage to witness the mind-bending energy of The Yugos. The relatively new and insanely young four-piece channel the absolute best elements of '70s Punk and New Wave with a dash of Surf and a couple hundred thousand volts of charisma. Spend any appreciable time with The Yugos and you'll detect distinct flashes of the jerky time signatures of XTC and Talking Heads, the Pop verve of Flock of Seagulls and the dark intensity of Echo and the Bunnymen. Drummer Jordin Gough jumps around the stage as though fire ants have been ceremonially sewn into his black jeans; he stands on his drum stool and beats on his kit from above, he takes the floor tom into the audience and thumps on it like a brave calling his tribe to action, while bassist Jeremy Graham provides an equally schizophrenic bottom and guitarists Christian Gough and Jackson Deal are peeling off punky New Wave riffs and licks that are as nerve-rattlingly appealing as The Cure on speed or Devo on hallucinogenics laced with antipsychotics. At their Lawn Stage set, The Yugos rolled out their latest track, "Follow You," did the song about a dream where a robot chased Christian down a hill, constantly called out a guy in the audience that looked like James Franco, dedicated a song to Seth Rogen and implored the assembled multitude to shake their asses. Comedy, Surf/Punk and a heart needle full of adrenaline combine to make the perpetual motion music machine known as The Yugos; with five years under their belts already, they're bound to last a hell of a lot longer than their namesakes.After a delicious burger from Dutch's in the Craft Beer Village and an equally delicious Puma Pilsner, courtesy of Black Owls hammer Brian Kitzmiller, it was a stroll over to the Main Stage to see ZZ Ward crank up her last couple of songs for a large and enthusiastic crowd and then down to the River Stage to catch a few songs from hot DJ/multi-instrumentalist Robert Delong, who filled the Serpentine Wall with Electronic music devotees who were digging his live-looped vibe with an almost religious fervor. Back on the Main Stage, Young the Giant blasted the swelling multitudes with the sticky/sweet Indie Rock hard candy that put them on a lot of attendees' must-see lists.I took my leave of the growing crowd in front of the Main Stage — a combination of devoted Young the Giant fans and Flaming Lips aficionados staking out their space for the imminent start time — to catch The Orwells at the Warsteiner Stage. The Orwells made my personal don't-miss list after a little due diligence in checking out their history and sound online for a preview in last week's CityBeat and they didn't disappoint. The quartet's central Illinois lineage is pretty much all the Pop cred they require and they use it to sweeten their rough-edged Garage/Punk love, as evidenced on last year's Disgraceland and the subsequent Other Voices and Who Needs YouEPs. Given the band's ramshackle nature (they'd pair up nicely with Cincy bands Mad Anthony or The Harlequins for a local show), it seemed like The Orwells might come a little unglued in the live presentation, but they were perhaps a little more restrained than I would have imagined. That could have been the post-storm vibe. They did toss out a raw chunk of the Foundations' "Build Me Up Buttercup," so that was pretty cool. Here's hoping we can get them back for a full show in better circumstances in the very near future so we can see what happens when The Orwells really put the pedal to the floor.I reluctantly ducked out of The Orwells a bit early to establish position for The Flaming Lips’ show, given the crush of rabid fans that were in all likelihood packing the front of the stage. For the sake of full disclosure, it should be noted at this juncture that I was looking forward to this show because I am a Flaming Lips virgin. I drank the Kool-Aid with Oh My Gawd!!! way back in 1987, but missed the local show on that tour because of my freelance production schedule. Since then, I've totally dug the studio Lips but somehow have never found my way to experiencing the live Lips; the closest I've ever gotten was nine years ago when I was in Austin for SXSW and Wayne Coyne came rolling down Sixth Street in the bubble with some sort of boombox entourage trailing behind, offering a soundtrack to the proceedings. And I suppose I could claim a certain amount of Lips cred for my two band interviews, the first with Steven Drozd in 2003 after the release of Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots and the second with Wayne in 2008 to talk about the DVD release ofChristmas on Mars. But the Bunbury show represented the taking of my live Flaming Lips cherry; after a quarter century of studio foreplay, I was more than ready. And what a glorious deflowering it was. After taking to the stage, which was appointed like a Peter Max flashback of Leary-esque proportions, the Lips launched into "The Abandoned Hospital Ship," with Wayne outfitted in a tinsel hairsuit that gave him the appearance of a glammed up Sasquatch. When it was over, he greeted the crowd warmly and promised that, should the rain begin again to the extent that the show had to be stopped, the Lips would be staying and they would finish the show, no matter what. The vast expanse of Lips fans roared their relief and the band shot headlong into "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots, Pt. 1," and the crowd's bliss was palpable. After a set that was filled with brilliant Lippage ("Look...The Sun is Rising" and "A Spoonful Weighs a Ton" among them), dancing rainbows, magic mushrooms big enough to give Mario a coke boner, a gyrating sun and a video/LED presentation splashy enough to trigger a mild epileptic seizure, the clouds cried just slightly at the prospect of the end of the evening. The Lips took a short breather and then returned with the biggest one-two pay-off in Bunbury's short but potent history; the gorgeously contemplative "Do You Realize??" from Yoshimi and an absolutely epic version of the Beatles' "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds," punctuated by several blasts from the four giant confetti cannons on stage. If I smoked cigarettes, I surely would have sparked one up after that conclusion.And thus marked the end of Bunbury's third installment. The last day's weather difficulties notwithstanding, it was another flawlessly presented and managed music festival put on by one of the city's most knowledgeable and Zen-like business heads, Bill Donabedian, and his amazing staff, who all handle every detail from gravely major to almost subatomically minor with a combination of ninja professionalism and weaponized OCD. And, as Bill would be the first to tell you, it couldn't be done without the walking live army of volunteers who make this thing run with the precision of God's pocketwatch. Plans are already afoot for Bunbury 4; they get harder to surpass with each subsequent summer, and somehow Bill and his festival all-stars manage to do just that. See you at the gate next July.SIDE NOTES• A lot of notable absences in the crowd this year, particularly my brother-from-another-mother Matthew Fenton. Either he just couldn't make it down this year, or he's actually perfected his cloak of invisibility and skillfully avoided me for the entire weekend. I hope it's the former.• Even with Sunday's threatened inclement weather, or as departing WCPO meterologist Larry Handley would characterize it, the blow job that nobody wants (no, Larry wouldn't say that, but I would and, in fact, just did), there was still a great turnout for the day's lineup. There was the inevitable run-in with Brent and Kat, and that makes every day worthwhile; they headed down to Brick + Mortar and after a swing around the grounds, I headed that way myself.• With the advent of lightning and the first shutdowns of the day, I headed for the Yeatman's Cove tunnels before things got too crazy. Moments after entering, the sky opened up and the rain pissed down, so I thought luck was on my side. I stopped to talk with a group of photographers, one of whom I've seen numerous times at Bunbury and MidPoint, which has made us sort of nodding acquaintances. We chatted for a bit, then he introduced himself as Steve Ziegelmeyer and asked if I had attended a wedding last year for someone from Jungle Jim's. In fact, my wife and daughter and I have gotten to know one of the guys from the dairy department at the Route 4 store who goes by Squidd, and when he announced that he was engaged, he insisted that we come to the wedding, which we were honored to do. Turns out Steve's wife works with Squidd's wife at Jungle Jim's Eastgate store, and he was at the wedding. And when he said it, I totally remembered seeing him there and completely blanking on where I knew him from. He gave me his card and an idea for a feature; I'll be remembering him now.• While I was waiting to see what would come of Kim Taylor's set, up strolled Eddy Mullet and his daughter Jess, looking none too worse the wear from Saturday's festivities. (Well, Eddy doesn't drink and Jess is 17, so the beating I take is typically incrementally worse than theirs, but I digress.) When the storm cranked up again, we headed for the shelter of the bridge and told ghost stories (they've got really good ones) until the sound of The Yugos drew us to the Lawn Stage.• We were headed to Robert Delong's set when I was waylaid by Mr. Brian Kitzmiller, a drum beater of epic reputation and a beer buyer worthy of sainthood, or at least knighthood. When I steered over to Dutch's food booth for a burger, Brian introduced me to Jerry and Pam who run Dutch's (Brian knows at least 60% of every group of people that he finds himself in), as well as a couple of guys from the band The Easthills, who were playing the part of the Black Owls this year (their early afternoon set was rained out, like the Owls’ were in Year 1.) Over by the Delong set, the ubiquitous and always welcome King Slice appeared, as did Owls bassist Kip Roe and his sons, Kip Jr. and Ben, and we had ourselves a Rock & Roll convoy.• Just before the Lips' extravaganza got underway, I ran into 500 Miles to Memphis frontman Ryan Malott, another prince of the local music realm, who was on his way down to the Warsteiner Stage to catch The Orwells. We had talked about the show when Ryan came into Class X to do Eddy's Kindred Sanction program for a Bunbury preview and a chat about the new 500MTM album, Stand There and Bleed, and I'm glad he reminded me. As I hit the Craft Beer Village on my way to The Orwells, I was absolutely floored to see my old friend Ric Hickey, one of the best guitarists this scene has ever produced, escorting his ladyfriend Michelle down to the Lips show. We caught up for a hot minute, then went our ways. Once at the Warsteiner Stage, as The Orwells were winding up, I spotted Mark Messerly near the back of the crowd, clearly contemplating how he would approach his Messerly & Ewing gig at next week's Buckle Up. No he was not; he was drinking a beer and imploring The Orwells to ramp it up. You know Mark. Venomous Valdez was right behind him, a vision in yellow on her birthday eve. Many happy returns, double V. And I finally caught up with Ryan, who introduced me to his lovely and relatively new wife Gina (I had to ask for her name twice because I'm old, I've got 40+ years of Rock & Roll ears and The Orwells had, in fact, ramped it up). As NRBQ once noted, you're good people, you are.• We all wound up hanging together for a good portion of the Lips' set, but one of my favorite moments was the Roe boys' faces when I confessed that this was my first live Lips lock. They couldn't have looked more astonished if I'd told them I'd just eaten a half pound of heroin-soaked grapes. Kip and his boys have seen the Lips on numerous occasions and, as a result, once we got camped near the stage, Kip Jr. tapped me on the shoulder and very politely began pointing out the elements of the Lips' set design and what everything was for. It was a very good tutorial, a sweet gesture for a teenager to connect with an old duffer such as myself, and proof positive that childrearing is a high art and Kip Roe should teach the whole bloody world exactly how to do it.• Finally, for the third consecutive year, the unofficial and extremely subjective results of my annual “Best T-Shirts at Bunbury” competition, selected and judged by me alone. This year was interesting for a couple of reasons, primarily because of Saturday's headliners, Paramore and Fall Out Boy. Their numerous fans were displaying their band love loud and proud, but I was struck by a rather odd observation; I'm fairly certain I didn't see two Fall Out Boy T-shirts featuring the same design (at least until the day after the show, when people who didn't have shirts likely bought them at the merch booths). Someone is accruing Donald Trump-like wealth from marketing an almost endless variety of FOB tees, that's for bloody sure. The other constant on Saturday was a steady parade of people in Ramones tees, in honor of Tommy Erdelyi, the last surviving original member of the legendary Punk band who succumbed to cancer on Friday. Bogart's owner Al Porkolab used to say that the best seat for a Ramones show was across the street at Dollar Bill's, where you could hear every note perfectly. I got his point, but I preferred my Ramones straight from the pipe. At any rate, R.I.P., Tommy.And so, as always, in no particular order, until the winner at the end:Hydrate ResponsiblyAbraham Drinkin#DopeI (graphic of Kurt Russell as Snake Pliskin) NYSoul PunkBad Decisions Make Great StoriesI Had Fun Once. It Was Awful.Y'All (in the Yale typeface)G-Dub (with George Washington in Raybans)Nope (with Shepard Faireyesque cat illustration); followed byDope (with Shepard Faireyesque Questlove illustration)There were many Foxy Shazam tees as well, including a vintage Flamingo Trigger design but my favorite was “Foxy Shazam. White Music for Black People”Got B3? (I'm assuming they mean the keyboard and not the vitamin)I Eat Glitter for BreakfastRock is Dead. Long Live Paper.I May Be Your Best OptionI Ain't Even MadAnd my favorite T-shirt from this year's Bunbury crowd:T-Rex hates push-ups (with a silhouette graphic depicting exactly why)
 
 

0|7
 
Close
Close
Close