WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Miracle or Mirage?

ACT scores and a mysteriously ended cheating probe raise questions about Taft High School’s climb to the top

8 Comments · Tuesday, February 21, 2012
In a Cincinnati neighborhood plagued by high rates of blight, poverty and crime, the new $18.4 million Robert A. Taft Information Technology High School in the West End couldn’t offer a more contrasting narrative. While city police book killers and other suspected felons right next door, Taft students are enriching their minds in nine computer labs and exploring the world through wall-to-wall Wi-Fi.   
by Kevin Osborne 03.30.2012
 
 
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Did Santorum Use 'N-Word'?

Some allege candidate almost made racial slur at campaign event

Some critics of Republican presidential hopeful Rick Santorum said video footage of a speech at a campaign event shows him starting to utter a racial slur while referring to President Obama, then cutting himself off mid-word.   While speaking to a group of supporters in Wisconsin on Tuesday, Santorum said, “We know what the candidate, Barack Obama, was like. The anti-war, government nig--, uh…” before stopping abruptly, then adding, “America was, uh, a source for division around the world. And that what we were doing was wrong. We needed to pull out and we needed to pull back.”   Although the uncompleted word sure sounds like it began with “nig” and what Santorum said next in the sentence didn’t flow naturally with the other words, a campaign spokesman today denied that the uncompleted word was “nigger.”   In January Santorum told a crowd of supporters in Iowa that he didn’t “want to make black people’s lives better by giving them other people’s money.”   Here is the clip of Tuesday’s speech. The remark causing controversy is spoken around the 34:30 mark. You can decide for yourself.
 
 
by Hannah McCartney 03.30.2012
Posted In: Human Rights at 01:39 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Ohio Creates Human Trafficking Task Force

Gov. Kasich gives task force 90 days to measure ability to identify victims

“Can you tell me how a 13-year-old kid can be snatched, blackmailed, drugged, raped, in our state? In our country?”That’s the question Ohio Gov. John Kasich asked audiences Thursday before signing an executive order to create the Human Trafficking Task Force, which is intended to combat human trafficking across the state and help victims recover. “I don’t think I can think of a greater evil than what we know as the human slave trade,” said Kasich, before signing the  order. A 2010 study conducted by the Trafficking in Persons Study Commission revealed that about 1,000 American-born children are forced into sex trade in Ohio every year, while about 800 immigrants fall victim to human trafficking, either through sexual exploitation or manipulation into hard labor. Kasich’s executive order will give the task force 90 days to examine Ohio’s current ability to identify victims. The board of the task force will be comprised of representatives from youth prisons, public safety departments, state health and human services and the state Cosmetology Board (some trafficking is suspected in nail salons, which the Cosmetology Board oversees). “They’ll tell me where the holes are, but we have lot more work to do,” Kasich said. “We need everybody in America to step in on this.” Ohio is suspected to be a major player in the U.S. human trafficking industry because of its large immigrant population, proximity to Canada and growing demand for cheap labor in light of difficult economic times, according to the 2010 Trafficking in Persons report. There’s currently no state funding set aside for the task force; the task will work hand-in-hand with Attorney General Mike DeWine's Human Trafficking Commission to buffer already existing efforts.
 
 

In Harm’s Way

Non-combat deaths of Ohio soldiers raise questions about U.S. military’s treatment of female members

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 27, 2012
There are several Ohio families whose military daughters died from “non-combat” circumstances, and their tragedy was amplified when the military tried to tarnish the victim’s reputation and even blame the victim for her own death.   

Cincinnati vs. The World 3.21.12

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 20, 2012
Ohio Sen. Troy Balderson (R-Zanesville) proposed new legislation to prevent new ownership of exotic pets such as gorillas and lions to prevent incidents like the one in Eastern Ohio when dozens of neglected animals were shot to death after their owner set them free and committed suicide.  

College Basketball Town, U.S.A.

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 20, 2012
For the first time in the history of the NCAA Tournament, four teams in the Sweet 16 — a qualified quarter — are from the state of Ohio, with Cincinnati, Xavier, Ohio and Ohio State moving on to make up 25 percent of the remaining teams fighting for a chance at basketball supremacy.  
by Kevin Osborne 03.19.2012
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

Many people in Greater Cincinnati still are reeling from the revelation over the weekend that the U.S. soldier who allegedly killed 16 people in Afghanistan grew up in Norwood. Military officials identified U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert “Bobby” Bales as the suspect in the case, which has inflamed tensions between Afghanistan and the United States and led to a renewed push to withdraw troops before the planned 2014 departure. Bales, 38, is a 1991 graduate of Norwood High School who joined the Army in November 2001, and was serving his fourth tour of duty when the incident occurred. Bales has been flown to a military jail at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, to await trial.The Cincinnati Fire Department is seeking a $6 million federal grant so it can increase staffing levels. If the department wins the grant, it will hold a recruit class to add up to 40 firefighters. The federal funding would cover two years' worth of salary and benefits for the recruits, but the city would have to pay training and equipment costs.Basketball fans are celebrating now that Ohio has four teams in the NCAA Tournament's “Sweet 16.” Ohio University scored an upset victory Friday against Michigan, winning 65-60, and winning 62-56 against South Florida on Sunday night. The Bobcats join the University of Cincinnati, Xavier University and Ohio State University in advancing in the tournament.The Buckeye State didn't fare so well in an analysis of government transparency and integrity. Ohio ranked 34th out of 50 states and got an overall grade of “D” in a study by the the Center for Public Integrity, Public Radio International and Global Integrity.In news elsewhere, if Mitt Romney gets the Republican Party's presidential nomination and somehow beats President Obama in the fall, he had better reward Puerto Rico in some fashion, possibly by bestowing statehood on the U.S. territory. Romney handily won the GOP's primary there Sunday, getting 83 percent of the votes. Because he won more than 50 percent, Romney will receive all 20 delegates at stake — giving him a much needed boost in his race against Rick Santorum. The next primaries are Tuesday in Illinois and Louisiana.Rick Santorum is turning to a secretive group of rich conservatives to pump cash into his campaign. The ex-Pennsylvania senator is relying on the Council for National Policy to fill his coffers and urge right-wing Republicans to unite behind his presidential bid. The council helped Santorum raise $1.8 million last week in Houston. Formed in 1981, the group brings together some of the Right's biggest donors, and helped George W. Bush in 2000 when his campaign was floundering.Four people are dead after a gunman burst into a Jewish school in France and opened fire. The victims include  a teacher, his two sons and another child. Officials said a man arrived in front of the school on a motorcycle or scooter. This is the third attack involving a gunman escaping on a motorcycle to take place in southwestern France during the past week, although police say it's unclear whether the attacks are terrorism-related.Heavy fighting broke out today between Syrian security forces and anti-government activists in a wealthy neighborhood of Damascus. At least 18 members of the security forces were killed in the battle, according to the London-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, but the official SANA news agency put the death toll much lower.An upsurge in fracking means North Dakota will overtake Alaska as the second-largest U.S. producer of oil within a few months, behind Texas. State data released this month showed energy companies in January fracked more wells than they drilled for the first time in five months, suggesting oil output could grow even faster than last year's 35 percent increase.
 
 

CPS, State Refuse to Address Taft Erasures

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 14, 2012
If Cincinnati Board of Education members harbor any doubts about the validity of graduation test scores at Robert A. Taft Information Technology High School, they’re not sharing them publicly.  

Council Considering Options For Four-Year Terms

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 7, 2012
The first of four public hearings on proposals to extend the terms of Cincinnati City Council members will be held March 21. City Council has drafted two proposals for consideration. Under one proposal, all nine council members would run at the same time, while in the other, terms would be staggered so some members would run every two years.   

Supreme Challenge

Local municipal court judge vies for Democratic nomination in Ohio Supreme Court race

1 Comment · Tuesday, February 28, 2012
Hamilton County Municipal Court Judge Fanon Rucker could be history in the making. Rucker is seeking a seat on the Ohio State Supreme Court. If he wins the Democratic primary and the general election, he then joins his father in being the first father and son to sit on a Supreme Court bench at the same time in U.S. history.    

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