A Man, a Dog, a 'Study' and Hurried, Gullible Reporters

2 Comments · Monday, December 7, 2009
A recent banner story on page 1 of The Enquirer's Local Life reported that Cincinnati Country Day was the second best high school in Ohio, based on passing percentage on state graduation tests and some yet-to-be revealed formula. The real story, if there was one, came later when it was mentioned that five Cincinnati area schools were in the top 10, including a public high school, Walnut Hills. I'm surprised the "study" dreamed up by a Columbus man in his basement survived The Enquirer's crap detector.  

Despite Bashings, Enquirer Continues to Move Forward ... to a Tabloid

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 15, 2009
Celebrating Reds Opening Day might be the only local tradition whose popularity and numbers exceed badmouthing The Enquirer. Hostility to the morning daily is amazing, as is critics' frequent admission that they don’t subscribe or read it regularly. As it moves through uncertain times, I'm betting that The Enquirer is going to embrace a tabloid format.   

Enquirer All A-Twitter

Daily newspaper turns to Twitter, Facebook and local blogs for answers in face of financial struggles

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 1, 2009
Just like many daily newspapers across the nation, The Cincinnati Enquirer is having an identity crisis. With increasing numbers of readers choosing to get their information on the Internet and through devices, The Enquirer finds itself struggling to remain a profitable business — and has unveiled a new "social media strategy" to engage those wandering readers.   

Holy Bad PR! Vatican Changes Pope's Press Remarks About AIDS and Condoms

2 Comments · Wednesday, April 1, 2009
The Vatican doesn't get it. I don't mean condoms, Islam or a Holocaust-denying bishop. I'm talking about the Internet. When Pope Benedict XVI asserted that condoms worsen Africa’s HIV/AIDS plague, bumbling Vatican aides corrected him, either ignoring or unaware that accurate news coverage was everywhere forever on the Internet.  

Debating the Media's Responsibility When Covering Suicides

1 Comment · Wednesday, March 18, 2009
Editors generally avoid news and images of local suicides, reflecting our awareness of historic religious stigma and communal sense of shame that can burden survivors. Exceptions generally involve suicides where lots of people see the act and/or body, as when someone jumps from a downtown building or hangs himself in a school gym. Taboos continue to affect our discussion of suicide as a way to end an intolerable life or unbearable physical or emotional pain. This is most intense when a young person commits suicide.  

Buy an Ad, Save a Newspaper

0 Comments · Tuesday, February 3, 2009
Ads determine the news hole in a ratio meant to show a profit; the news hole includes everything not an ad: photos, illustrations, headlines, comics, recipes, weather map, etc. Editors get page layouts with the ads blocked in. They work around them.   

Paper Cuts

As newspaper industry bleeds, Enquirer tries to hold on

5 Comments · Wednesday, December 10, 2008
Prompted by the troubled U.S. economy, Greater Cincinnati's only remaining daily newspaper laid off several employees Dec. 2 and 3 under strict orders from its owner, Gannett Co. Although the number of layoffs wasn't disclosed, at least 30 people (including 13 in the newsroom) were let go, sources say. Further, The Enquirer's 'newshole' will be reduced by six pages on Sundays and a total of 30 pages across the other weekdays beginning the week of Dec. 28, says Editor Tom Callinan.   

Enquirer and Daily Papers Down but Not Out

2 Comments · Wednesday, December 10, 2008
Enquirer Editor Tom Callinan is a veteran print journalist trying to reconfigure his 'paper' and staff under awful conditions in the Internet Age. Success will include keeping older, affluent readers and attracting younger, increasingly affluent readers. He doesn't need my advice, and I'm glad I'm not in his position.  

All Aboard ... or End of the Line?

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 10, 2008
As the financial world churns and tosses, you might hear someone offer a warning against businesses becoming too complacent. "What the railroads failed to understand," this person will say, "is that they weren't in the railroad business." The moral: The railroad companies mistook their medium (trains) for their core product (transportation). The newspaper business is now being put through the railroad analogy grinder, and the comparisons are apt.   

Another Seven Days of Free Terrorists and New GNR

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 26, 2008
We at WWE! don't always try our best. But our journalistic indifference results in harmless poop jokes and curse words, unlike Cincinnati Enquirer reporters, whose bad sense of humor often results in the public embarrassment of poor people.