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A Dangerous Method (Review)

David Cronenberg allows actors’ methods to shine

0 Comments · Tuesday, January 24, 2012
Danger has been a factor in the recent films of David Cronenberg, but the tension and anxiety has been focused on the physical, the threat of bodily harm and the need to determine where said harm would originate.    

Wendy And Lucy (Oscilliscope)

2008, Rated R

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 13, 2009
It’s tempting to label this melancholy wisp of a film as a wake-up call for a nation gone bankrupt (in more ways than one). But Wendy and Lucy is far too subtle for that: It makes Marley and Me look like Porky’s. Kelly Reichardt’s follow-up to the excellent Old Joy tells the simple story of a girl, Wendy (Michelle Williams, whose compelling, vanity-free performance is the film’s glue), and her dog, Lucy (Reichardt’s own dog).  

Come Again?

The second coming in the age of sequels and reboots

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 20, 2011
What better time, it would seem, to explore the life of God as Man? Our heroes are darker, more conflicted beings, grappling with ethical quandaries and the nature of morality. Machines have become more human as we have begun to mix and co-mingle with them. If we cannot re-imagine Jesus now and make him relevant, then when?  

Back to the Beginning

Reinventing the creation myth behind franchise films

1 Comment · Wednesday, May 20, 2009
We’ve gotten so jaded about the hackneyed, hyperactive “franchise films” that Hollywood floods us with each summer — X-Men Origins: Wolverine, anyone? — that we fail to recognize when the movie business comes up with a good new idea.   

Patti Smith: Dream of Life

Palm Pictures, 2008, Unrated

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 11, 2009
Steven Sebring spent 11 years working on this film about Rock icon/poet/activist Patti Smith, as worthy a subject for a documentary as anyone in Pop music. But his project at some point overwhelmed him.  

CAM Parts Ways with Cincinnati World Cinema

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 25, 2009
Citing diminishing returns, the Cincinnati Art Museum has ended its relationship with Cincinnati World Cinema, a presenter of art films, classics, shorts collections and documentaries that had been using its auditorium since 2007. That has left the future unclear for those who feel Cincinnati needs a non-commercial outlet for such specialized films that otherwise wouldn't play here.  

Kross-Bearer

'The Reader' actor David Kross speaks about Germany’s guilt

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 18, 2009
Actor Thomas Kretschmann, who played Wilm Hosenfeld, the German officer who aided Wladyslaw Szpilman (Adrien Brody) as he sought to escape capture in Warsaw in 1944, introduced me to the idea of German guilt during an interview for Roman Polanskis The Pianist.  

Ain't No Sunshine When She's Gone

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 28, 2009
The 25th Sundance Film Festival came to a close on Jan. 24, and for the first time in 15 years a CityBeat staffer wasn’t there to witness it. As was the case for many publications (as well as general film freaks and industry people), the shitty state of our economy forced us to skip Sundance’s unique mix of adventurous, independent moviemaking and hype-driven industry wheeling and dealing.   

Wild Combination: A Portrait of Arthur Russell (Review)

Plexifilm, 2008, Not Rated

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 28, 2009
One reason it’s become so hard for new musicians to make an impact is because so many old ones — including deceased ones — are still being discovered (or rediscovered), thanks to the proselytizing efforts of those who somehow got turned on to their obscure work the first time around.   

Sign of the Times

'The Dark Knight' dominated the year in mainstream movies

0 Comments · Tuesday, December 23, 2008
Movies as cultural events are rapidly becoming relics of the past. It's rare when a new movie can even come close to generating the enthusiasm that greeted old-school epics like 'Gone with the Wind' or relatively new-school blockbusters like 'Jaws' and 'Star Wars.' Home viewing has forever changed the way we watch movies. The essential big-screen theatrical experience has been compromised for the comforts of the couch or the portability of an iPod.  

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