WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

The Black Angels and Roky Erickson & the Hounds of Baskerville with Golden Animals

Friday • The Southgate House Revival

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 5, 2014
The Black Angels’ tag-team with Roky Erickson for something called the Winter Psych Storm Tour is almost too obvious. The five-piece Psych Rock crew has long adored the era in which Erickson was a trailblazing figure with The 13th Floor Elevators.  

Man Man with Xenia Rubinos

Tuesday • Southgate House Revival

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 15, 2014
If a band is entirely made up of musicians operating under eccentric aliases, there’s an incredibly good chance said band’s music is also eccentric and worthy of your attention. Man Man is a lesser-known but fitting addition to this class, what with the Philly five-piece sporting members nicknamed Honus Honus, Turkey Moth and Pow Pow.   

The Jim Jones Revue with The KillTones

Sunday • Southgate House Revival

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 8, 2014
Jim Jones was doing loud in London at about the same time Kurt Cobain and Mark Arm discovered their amps went to 11 in the Pacific Northwest.  

Driftwood with Part-Time Gentlemen and Red Beard’s Revenge

Thursday • Southgate House Revival

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 8, 2014
In its bio, on-the-rise Americana quartet Driftwood is described as “a band with a Rock & Roll soul and a Folk art mind.” With 2011’s sophomore album, A Rock & Roll Heart, and the remarkable, just-released self-titled follow-up, the band’s descriptions are proved accurate.   

Against Me! with The Sidekicks and The Shondes

Friday • Southgate House Revival

0 Comments · Monday, December 30, 2013
In 2012, singer/songwriter/guitarist Tom Gabel of Floridian rockers Against Me! made the kind of announcement that 20 years ago would have been met with scandal and backlash. A testament to evol  
by Mike Breen 10.24.2013
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music at 09:56 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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One More Girl on a Stage Festival Begins Tonight

Benefit for Making Strides Against Breast Cancer expands to three nights, two states

After taking a year off, the One More Girl on a Stage music festival returns starting tonight, bigger and better than ever. Founded by local musician Kelly Thomas (Kelly Thomas and the Fabulous Pickups, The Tammy Whynots), One More Girl (OMG) is striving to raise $10,000 for the American Cancer Society’s Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk.  Instead of hosting the festival at one venue, this year’s One More Girl benefit has expanded to six local venues in two cities over three nights. The lineup for One More Girl showcases female solo artists and bands with a female presence (mostly) from the Greater Cincinnati area. Many of them also happen to be some of the best acts in the region, playing a range of styles that includes everything from Hard Rock and Pop Rock to Bluegrass, Folk and many other variations on the Americana theme. Below are the lineups, links to venues and performers and a few samples from the some of the acts. One More Girl on a Stage kicks off tonight in Over-the-Rhine, with artists featured at four venues. There are no cover charges at any of the venues. MOTR Pub: 8:30 p.m. Good Night Noises Blood Orange from Good Night Noises on Myspace.9:30 p.m. A Juliet Bender 10:30 p.m. Sticky Honey 11:30 p.m. Darlene Japp’s Annex: 8 p.m. Charmed & Tarnished (a new project from Kelly Thomas and Randy Steffen) 9 p.m. The Missy Werner Band10 p.m. Salty Candy (a new project from The Fairmount Girls' Melissa Fairmount) 11 p.m. Magnolia Mountain Quartet 12 a.m. Heavy HingesNeons Unplugged: 7:30 p.m. Sami Riggs 8:30 p.m. Debra Randall and Chuck Keller 9:30 p.m. Carrie SampleLearn how to get your music noticed at ReverbNation.com10:30 p.m. Jenny Ward 11:30 p.m. Mia Carruthers The Drinkery: 7:30 p.m. Holly Spears BandSell music on Amazon at ReverbNation.com8:30 p.m.  Kerosene Alley 9:30  p.m. Wendy Oakley and The Posse 10:30  p.m. Stompin’ Revolvers 11:30 p.m. Buenos Crotches Learn how to make a free Electronic Press KitTomorrow, the OMG fest takes over the three stages at the Southgate House Revival in Newport, Ky. Tickets for Friday are available in advance for $15 here. Lounge:8:15 p.m.  Raison D’etre 9:15 p.m. Danielle Yockey 10:15 p.m. The Stories 11:15 p.m. RuccaFree Electronic Press Kits from ReverbNation.com12:15 a.m.  Sassy Molasses (The 5 Stages) Stage One: Denial & Isolation by Sassy MolassesRevival Room:7 p.m. Boone County Catawallers 8  p.m. Heather Hamlet 9  p.m. Jetlab 10 p.m. The Newbees 11 p.m. The Perfect Children 12 a.m. Chakras Sanctuary: 7:30 p.m. Ma Crow & The Lady Slippers 8:30 p.m. Shiny & The Spoon10 p.m. Jesse Thomas11 p.m. The Tammy WhyNots 12 a.m.  Veronica Grim and The Blue Ribbon Boys  Saturday’s OMG performances will be held on two stages at Newport’s York Street Café beginning at 7 p.m.  Admission is $10 or you can purchase a Friday/Saturday pass for $20 in advance, which will get you into both the Southgate shows and the ones at York Street (click here to purchase). Third Floor Art Gallery Stage: 7 p.m.  Kelly Routt 8 p.m. Chelisa Bailey 9 p.m. Wonky Tonk & the Holiday RamblersBlind Date (rough) by Wonky Tonk10 p.m. Carole WalkerLearn how to get your song on itunes at ReverbNation.com11 p.m. Hickory Robot Second Floor Stage: 7:30 p.m. The Dishes 8:30 p.m. Terminal Union 9:30 p.m. Houston & HoneyFree Electronic Press Kits from ReverbNation.com10:30 p.m. Alone at 3AMMidwest Mess by Alone At 3AM11:30 p.m. Kelly Thomas and The Fabulous Pickups Click here or here for even more information on all things One More Girl. 
 
 

One More Girl on a Stage Fest Returns

Plus, Cincy Psych Fest expands for its second annual celebration of trippy Rock

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 23, 2013
After a year off, the One More Girl on a Stage music festival/benefit returns bigger than ever, taking place over three nights this week in various venues in Over-the-Rhine and Newport. The Cincy Psych Fest also marks its return this week with its second annual affair taking place Saturday at Mayday in Northside.  

Can Music Save Mountains?

Benefit to spread awareness about mountaintop removal mining returns and IsWhat?! curates a night of art

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 9, 2013
The successful Music for the Mountains project, which spreads information about the practice of "mountaintop removal" coal mining, releases its second local Roots music compilation album and multi-act concert this Saturday in Newport, Ky.   
by Amy Harris 09.09.2013
Posted In: Live Music, Interview at 09:40 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
lightnin malcolm

Q&A with Lightnin' Malcolm

Raw Blues maker plays with North Mississippi Allstars tonight at Southgate House Revival

Lightnin’ Malcolm is an emerging driving force in the genre of underground Blues as a member of the North Mississippi All-Stars and also as a solo artist. Alongside counterpart Carl Gentle White aka "Stud" on drums, the dichotomy of their two styles produces a rough, soulful sound that reminds folks of Blues legends like Lightnin' Hopkins and Howlin' Wolf. Audiences should be prepared to dance, party and delight in Malcolm’s deep Mississippi sounds tonight at the Southgate House Revival. Malcolm is opening for and playing alongside the North Mississippi All-Stars. Showtime is 8 p.m.  CityBeat: I know you have an album coming out on Sept. 10. Can you tell me a little bit about it? Lightnin' Malcolm: Well, it is 14 original songs and they have quite a few different styles on them. It is all based on my style, which is based on the hard driving, raw boogie North Mississippi Hill Country style. It is mostly (the) guitar and drums duo but we add some horns on a few tracks. We have Luther Dickinson playing slide on a few songs. So it is a pretty good mix of stuff. CB: I was listening to some of it this week. I love “My Life is a Wreck.” Can you tell me the story behind that song? LM: Well, that is a semi-autobiographical piece. One of my greatest influences was T Model Ford and he recently passed and that song was based on a style he had on the guitar. His grandson Stud is playing drums with me now. That was the first song we did in the studio. That was his first song recording and I thought it was a great way to feature it. My music depends on a great drummer. Drums are so important to the music and he is one of the best. I have known Stud since he was like 1 years old. He grew up watching me play drums with his granddad. He knows the style of drums that I like, the raw, four on the floor, predator style, no messing around. Just raw and making people dance. By us knowing each other so long, he is like my little baby brother. We have this chemistry together that works so well. CB: I watched some videos of you two playing together. It is super high energy and looks like a lot of fun. LM: Yeah, that is the key to it all. We don’t have to hit a note exactly right or (do flashy) guitar solos. We just try to create as much … fun for the people as we can. We just want to see people party and have fun. CB: How old were you when you picked up your first guitar? LM: I was about 10 or 12. Before that, I really wanted to be a drummer. I used to beat on buckets and pots and pans, put the radio on and play along with them. I didn’t have any actual drums and I finally got a hold of a little piece of guitar. I didn’t know how to tune it or nothing, but I fell in love with the strings in my hand. It took a while to learn how to tune it because I didn’t have anybody around me to show me at that time. Once I learned how to tune it, I started learning pretty fast. It just became everything to me. I look at the guitar like some people look at The Bible. It is like a vehicle for something later. I leave Earth. I can go on a vacation in my backyard with a guitar. I can escape to a whole other world with it.  CB: I know you eventually moved to Mississippi after growing up in Missouri. How did you hook up with some of these great guitar and Blues players in Mississippi? LM: I just made friends with them. They saw something special in me, I think. I wasn’t trying to blow them off stage. I didn’t ask them many questions, like how to do things. They noticed whatever they played, I could play back. They hadn’t seen too many white guys, or any guys, that could do that. So we just made friends. It was pretty easy. Those were the kind of guys I wanted to be around. They really took me in. They were really nice to me. They never said I wouldn’t be able to do it. There was everybody else saying, “You won’t be able to do it.” They were the guys saying, “You got it. Stick with it.”  CB: Alive or dead, what one person would you want to collaborate with if you could? LM: That’s a good question. I think, you know what’s funny, there are a lot of people outside of the Blues I’d like to collaborate with nowadays. Of course, like, John Lee Hooker is one of my all time favorites, Howlin' Wolf, there are so many Blues guys. Out of living artists, I’ll tell you a guy I love right now, two guys I love, they are more like R&B. (One is an) artist named Lyfe Jennings, I don’t know if you’ve ever heard of him, he’s fucking awesome, he’s so sincere. Another guy is Anthony Hamilton who is a Soul singer. To me, even though their style is way different than mine, those are guys I really hear singing where I’m like, "Wow, they really hit the ceiling." You don’t hear it that much anymore. Everybody is using effects. You really don’t hear that wail in that voice. Otis Redding had that, you heard his voice and you just had to see him. You don’t hear anybody like that anymore. I know people wouldn’t expect that from me, but when I am riding down the highway listening to music, those are two guys I really listen to, that I look up to and would be great to collaborate with. CB: That leads me into another question. There has been so much publicity recently around Pop music with Miley Cyrus and the VMAs. To me it shows how much more important it is to keep really authentic Blues music in front of people. What are your thoughts on that? LM: I agree with that. I’m out here fighting the good fight doing what I can. It’s not always easy. People have to support what is going on. If people start throwing their money at garbage, you’re going to end up with a lot of garbage. I can’t speak for the next person but I can say this — there isn’t enough hours in the day to listen to great music. There is all the great music you can listen to. There is definitely no time for nonsense. I don’t waste time listening to stuff that sounds like garbage. That’s just me.  My drummer, Stud, he’s young. He was watching the awards the other night and I was laying on the couch trying to sleep. I didn’t miss much. The hours in the day are precious. I would use them wisely. You don’t have to listen to garbage. That’s about the best I can do. If anybody can make some money doing something, good for you, I don’t mean it the wrong way. If you ask me about serious music, there is great music out there being made. It is just underground. Maybe it is too real for people. I am not the expert on this type of thing, I just know what I like, I listen to what I like. Even when I was a kid in school, I was listening to way different music. I was listening to Lightnin' Hopkins and John Lee Hooker and would tell the other kids, “You have got to hear this. Check it out.” They just said, “Whatever.” I thought maybe when they grew up they would understand.  CB: What can the fans expect from you guys at the Southgate House Revival show?  LM: We are coming to rock y’all. We want y’all to come and have fun and dance and boogie. We want you to get in the groove and forget about everything in the outside world for a couple hours and get in the zone. We want to have a party for y’all. Being on stage can be the funnest thing in the world when it is going right. When it is going wrong, you just want to disappear. It is a funny thing. When it is right, it is right as a motherfucker.
 
 

Banded Together

Cincinnati’s Shiny and the Spoon go from spare duo to full quartet on sophomore album

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 28, 2013
Box of Bullets, the new full-length album from Cincinnati Folk/Americana/Pop crew Shiny and the Spoon, is given “more bite and edge" thanks to the act's completed evolution into a full-time quartet.  

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