WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Rick Pender 10.25.2013
Posted In: Theater at 09:19 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cabaret

Stage Door: 'Cabaret' and Halloween Fare

The Cincinnati Playhouse's production of Cabaret is a must-see for anyone who is a fan of musicals. (CityBeat review here.) Kander and Ebb's Tony Award winner from the late '60s has been brought to the main stage with inventive verve by veteran Broadway choreographer and director Marsha Milgrom Dodge. Sure, it's set in 1929 Berlin, populated by amoral entertainers and Nazis rising to power. But its scrutiny of prejudice and bigotry in the context of jaunty, thoughtless entertainment is a fascinating way to bring attention to topics that are timeless. Dodge has assembled a cast of triple-threats (who can sing, act and dance), given them choreography rooted in the 1920s, costumed them in period clothing (and some clever get-ups for the cabaret routines) and set them spinning on a stage arrayed with Expressionist imagery. It's a winning combination. Cabaret just opened on Thursday evening; you have until Nov. 16 to catch it, but it's likely to be a hot ticket, so this is a good weekend to head to Mount Adams. The other choice at the Playhouse, Seven Spots on the Sun, is in its final weekend on the Shelterhouse stage. It's a powerful drama set in a Latin American nation, torn asunder by civil war. Serious theatergoers have been giving this one a thumbs-up. Tickets: 513-421-3888. Cincinnati Shakespeare hasn't gotten around to any Shakespeare plays yet this season, but no one's complaining. Last weekend they opened a moving production of John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men, featuring top-notch performances by Jeremy Dubin and Jim Hopkins as a pair of Depression Era migrant works who have to stay one step ahead of trouble because man-child Lennie (Hopkins) doesn't know his own strength and has emotions that are seldom reined in. Great acting, worth seeing. (CityBeat review here.) Through Nov. 10. Tickets: 513-381-2273, x1. Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati finishes its run of Gina Gionfriddo's Rapture, Blister, Burn this weekend, hot from Broadway in its regional premiere. (CityBeat review here.) A story about modern women and what satisfies — and dissatisfies — them. Three generations end up debating choices made: It's both entertaining and thought-provoking, a showcase of excellent local actors. Through Sunday. Tickets: 513-421-3555. As Halloween draws closer, you might want to check out a show or two inspired by the "season." Dracula at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts (tickets: 513-241-6550) tells the familiar tale of the legendary vampire. (CityBeat review here.) Slasher at Falcon Theatre (Monmouth Theatre in Newport; tickets 513-479-6783) is a tongue-in-cheek piece that originated a few years back at the Humana Festival in Louisvile. It's about people making a horror flick and how it affects their lives. Lots of humor, but some thoughtful moments, too.
 
 
by Rick Pender 10.18.2013
Posted In: Theater at 08:34 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
todo_onstage_raptureblisterburn_ryankurtz

Stage Door: Choices, Choices

My best recommendation for this weekend is Ensemble Theatre's staging of Gina Gionfriddo's Rapture, Blister, Burn. This is an ultra-natural piece of writing with several generations of women arguing and contesting over the ways women should behave. (CityBeat review here.) It's focused on two women, once friends, one married to the other's ex college boyfriend. It's years later and neither woman is very happy with her present life. How that plays out will keep you engaged from start to finish. Some exceptional acting, with strong direction by D. Lynn Meyers. Tickets: 513-421-3555. The Playhouse's world premiere of Martín Zimmerman's Seven Spots on the Sun is a powerful drama that engages all your senses as well as your imagination. The products of a devastating civil war in Central America are played out in painfully personal ways. Potent script, strong performances make this a show worth seeing. (CityBeat review here.) This weekend at the Playhouse also offers a series of previews (hence, more affordable tickets) of Kander and Ebb's Cabaret, a show that's been around for a long time — but still has a saucy kick that makes it feel very in the moment. Playhouse box office: 513-421-3888. Need to starting getting into a Halloween state of mind? Covedale Center opened a production of Dracula on Thursday (it's onstage through Nov. 10) for you to sink your teeth into. Or vice versa. Tickets: 513-241-6550. Cincinnati Shakespeare kicks off its production of John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men this evening. It's a tale of friendship in the midst of the Great Depression, two men who are migrant workers, often staying one step beyond serious trouble caused by oafish Lennie. Cincy Shakes' regular Jim Hopkins plays the simple-minded giant who's protected by the pragmatic George, brought to life by veteran Jeremy Dubin. It's a thoughtful, sad story. Opens Friday evening, continues through Nov. 10. Tickets: 513-381-2273, x1. Speaking of Cincinnati Shakespeare, the company is involved in bringing National Theatre Live broadcasts from London to Cincinnati. If these screenings generate any profits, Cincy Shakes will get some financial benefit. So assemble a group and head to Springdale 18's Cinema de Luxe on Sunday evening at 7 p.m. You'll see a powerful performance of Othello featuring  Adrian Lester (an Olivier Award winner) as the title character and Rory Kinnear (featured in a couple of recent James Bond films) as the manipulative Iago. Here's a link to buy tickets, $19 in general, $15 for seniors and students. Take a kid to see a show and you're likely to create a lifetime theater lover. That's what happened to me when my grandfather took me to see the musical Brigadoon. So you can give this theory a try this weekend as the Children's Theatre of Cincinnati opens its 89th mainstage season with Annie JR. at the Taft Theatre. It's a shortened version of the Broadway hit about a spunky orphan who charms everyone (and which happens to be back on Broadway this fall in a full-length production). Public performances today, tomorrow and Sunday. Tickets: 800-745-3000.
 
 

Learning Experiences: Cincy Shakes and Xavier Theater Collaborate

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Cincinnati Shakespeare Company is partnering with the theater program at Xavier University to stage Arthur Miller’s The Crucible. (Oct. 25- Nov. 3; tickets are $15-$30; 513-745-3939.) This came about because Stephen Skiles, who heads XU’s theater program, is friends with Brian Isaac Phillips, CSC’s artistic director. Skiles was an acting intern at the Cincinnati Playhouse 16 years ago when Phillips was recruited to fill out a cast.  
by Rick Pender 09.27.2013
Posted In: Theater at 11:32 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
stage door 9-13 - fly @ playhouse - photo sandy underwood

Stage Door: Memory Lane

Perhaps this weekend you want to take a last-chance trip down Memory Lane. You have that option as the Showboat Majestic is wrapping up its production of Showboat Follies, the final show that Cincinnati Landmark Productions will stage on the historic vessel. It's a revue of songs and skits that should be fun if not profound, but if you go (final performance is Sunday), you'll be able to tell you foriends that you were among the last to visit this nostalgic Cincinnati venue. (Unless the City of Cincinnati finds another operator — which they've been seeking with no success.) Tickets: 513-241-6550. This weekend also offers the final performances of Oliver Twist at Cincinnati Shakespeare Company. It's a tale of crime and child abuse from the Victorian era, and not terribly chipper — think A Christmas Carol without any holiday spirits. But as always with Cincy Shakes, there's some fine acting — and they've added some musical elements that keep things interest, too. Through Sunday. Tickets: 513-381-2273, x1. The most engaging theater onstage right now (and sticking around until Oct. 4) is Fly at the Cincinnati Playhouse. It's a creative portrait of four aspiring African Americans striving to be Tuskegee Airmen during World War II. The challenges they faced — prejudice, rigorous training and life-threatening aerial combat — not only made them pioneers who addressed civil rights issues decades before the rest of America, it made them heroes, too. Making this production all the more interesting is a modern tap dancer who "underscores" many of the scenes with movement and rhythm. I suspect you've never seen anything quite like this. Tickets: 513-241-3888. If you're a movie fan I suspect you've seen Carrie (based on Stephen King's novel about a bullied girl who unleashed her telekinetic powers) and Ghost (about a guy who's murdered but comes back with the help of a crazy psychic to save the lover he's lost). They've both been turned into unmemorable musicals that are onstage locally for you to see. I've seen them both, and I'm sorry to say that — despite some fine voices (in Carrie at the Carnegie, presented by Showbiz Players) and a lot of video and special effects (a touring production of Ghost at the Aronoff Center) — I believe you might be better off to pull out your DVD of either film to watch.  I haven't seen it, but I'm intrigued by Northern Kentucky University's production of Moby Dick Rehearsed. Herman Melville's great American novel is brought to life onstage when a company of Shakespearean actors stop rehearsing King Lear and consider a new play drawn from the tale of the Great White Whale. Theater elements become aspects of the Pequod as the crew is lashed along in Captain Ahab's obsessive hunt for the beast that took his leg. Through Oct. 6. Tickets: 859-572-5464.
 
 
by Rick Pender 09.13.2013
Posted In: Theater at 09:19 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door 9-13 - fly @ playhouse - photo sandy underwood

Stage Door: Back in Business

Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati is typically the first professional theater in town to start the season, and that's the case for 2013 with Other Desert Cities that opened a week ago. You can read my review; I really appreciated the powerhouse cast performing the show. That led me to give Jon Robin Baitz's provocative family drama about strife between generations a "Critic's Pick." (It's onstage through Sept. 22.) A tip option for seats is an added 7 p.m. performance on that final Sunday. If you enjoy ETC's productions of fresh new plays, you owe a debt of gratitude to its founding supporters. Longtime friends Ruth Sawyer and Murph Mahler got the ball rolling back in 1987 and faithfully guided the company for two decades, sustaining the company financially, artistically and spiritually. Mahler passed away in 2009 and Sawyer earlier this year, so ETC is commemorating their dedication with a special free event this Sunday evening at 7 p.m. The program will offer songs and stories performed by some of ETC's best artists. Seating is limited, so you need to RSVP: 513-421-3555.I attended the opening of the Cincinnati Playhouse's 2013-2014 season last evening. Fly is a heart-grabbing piece of history, the story of four Tuskegee Airmen, some of those bold African Americans who overcame prejudice in the 1940s by joining the Army Air Corps and serving America valiantly during World War II. The show is imaginatively presented, using a modern tap dancer to punctuate the storytelling. There's plenty of excitement, conveyed with video and sound — but mostly with some excellent acting. The full-house audience, which included four veterans of the training program, responded warmly. Through Oct. 5. Tickets: 513-421-3888. Cincinnati Shakespeare's Oliver Twist is a stage adaptation of Charles Dickens' dark 1838 novel about crime and child abuse in Victorian London (CityBeat review here). It's a grim drama, definitely not the chipper rendition you might recall if you've seen the musical Oliver! Cincy Shakes' acting company rises to the task, but I suspect you'll leave the theater glad you weren't a child — or an adult — in that era.  Through Sept. 29. 513-381-2273. A few years back a play was commissioned about Cincinnati as A City of Immigrants. It's a fine piece of theater about the place we call home and how it's rooted in people who came here from elsewhere. It gets presented periodically, including tonight (Friday) at 6 p.m. at the Freedom Center, 30 East Freedom Way on the Banks. (Doors open at 5:30.) There's no charge for admission; it's definitely worth seeing. The event is to mark the kickoff of the local celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month.
 
 

Oliver Twist (Review)

Cincinnati Shakespeare's remake of a classic generally “well-cured”

1 Comment · Monday, September 9, 2013
 Michael Evan Haney, an associate artist at the Cincinnati Playhouse ably directs Neil Bartlett adaptation of Oliver Twist, Charles Dickens’ classic orphan tale. While it features several songs, it’s definitely not the jaunty 1960 musical Oliver!   

A Flavor for Every Taste

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 21, 2013
Here are three categories designed to satisfy different tastes: theatergoers who love musicals, those who yearn for the classics and anyone with a taste for new plays. Since this is CityBeat’s fall preview, these are shows you can catch before the holidays.    
by Rick Pender 08.09.2013
Posted In: Theater at 08:18 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door blog - 39 steps @ cincy shakes - nick rose & mranda mcgee - photo rich sofranko

Stage Door: Comedies and Classics

Summer is flying by, or so it seems. This is the final weekend for you to see Cincinnati Shakespeare's production of The 39 Steps (CityBeat review here), a satiric adaptation of Alfred Hitchcock's classic 1935 film of espionage and intrigue. Making it all the more amusing is the fact that the story is performed by four actors, two of whom play most of the citizens of London and beyond, using a lot of quick changes and quick thinking. It's a very entertaining evening of tomfoolery, featuring four of Cincy Shakes' most talented comedic actors. Your last chances to see the show are Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m. 513-381-2273.Another entertaining production is Lauren Gunderson's very new play, Toil and Trouble (CityBeat review here), at Know Theatre. It's a comedy about contemporary slackers trying to make a quick buck that's got a very Shakespearean ring to it — Macbeth, to be precise. The humor presses a bit too hard at moments, but if you go to have a good time, you'll definitely find one. Instead of warriors and kings vying for the throne, this one focuses on 30-year-olds trying to strike it rich without working too hard — but the echoes of the Elizabethan tragedy can't be missed. There's a steady stream of sports talk, too, making comparisons between baseball and life. It's a strange brew, but plenty of laughs. Through Aug. 24. Tickets: 513-300-5669. Musicals are always popular, but for some reason they seem especially attractive fare in the summer months. So we can say thanks to the Carnegie in Covington for serving up a tasty one, Kander and Ebb's Chicago, an all-time Broadway favorite. This production — the sexy, salacious tale of murderous women in Chicago in the 1920s — features choreography by Broadway veteran and Cincinnati native David Baum in his local professional debut. Word has it that he's put together some of the most inventive choreography seen on local stages in a long time. The production opens on Saturday evening (7:30 p.m.) and repeats on Sunday (3 p.m.). It continues for two more weekends, through Aug. 25. 859-957-1940. Also onstage this weekend (and running through Aug. 25) is Woody Allen's hit Broadway comedy, Don't Drink the Water. Amusingly, it's on board the Showboat Majestic (where you definitely don't want to drink the water) — but it's a humorous tale of tourists caught in an American embassy behind the Iron Curtain. Lightweight entertainment, but a lot of fun. 513-241-6550.
 
 
by Rick Pender 08.02.2013
Posted In: Theater at 08:10 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
charlie cromer and maggie lou rader - photo jeanna vellacincy shakes - romeo & juliet (shakespeare in the park tour) -

Stage Door: Double Dose from CSC

Cincinnati Shakespeare Company is offering a double dose of entertainment this weekend. First and foremost is The 39 Steps at CSC's mainstage (CityBeat review here). If that title sounds familiar, it's because it was a classic espionage novel a century ago, made into a classic film by Alfred Hitchcock 80 years ago, now turned into a very funny riff on its predecessors as a play using only four actors to fill all the roles. CSC has ramped up the humor by using four of its best comedic actors — Nick Rose, Miranda McGee, Justin McComb and Billy Chace — who play the principals, plus much of the population of London, especially McComb and Chace who will make you dizzy as they shift from one part to another, sometimes within seconds. It's actually a faithful retelling of the story, but it's amped up to a high level of hilarity by the onstage shenanigans. It adds up to great summertime humor. It's being performed through Aug. 11. Tickets: 513-381-2273, x1. One show isn't enough for CSC: This weekend they also launch their annual free Shakespeare in the Park tour with a performance of Romeo & Juliet at Boone Woods Park in Burlington at 7 p.m. on Saturday. (If you live north of the river, you'll get your chance next Wednesday evening at Eden Park's Seasongood Pavilion or at Burnet Woods in Clifton on Thursday.) As noted, these are free presentations, presented in classic Elizabethan style and use six actors from the company's resident ensemble. These are the same productions that CSC tours to schools and community centers, so they're great for the entire family. A week from now they'll start performing A Midsummer Night's Dream at some locations. For a full schedule, go here. Shakespeare is behind the story of Toil and Trouble, the current offering at Know Theatre. It's a new play (this is just the second time its been produced; its world premiere was in California last fall) that offers a contemporary riff on Macbeth (CityBeat review here). Instead of kings and warriors, however, its characters are a pair of thirtysomething slackers and Beth, a wildly ambitious sportscaster who has more testosterone than either of the guys. There's a lot of wacky moments in this play, replaces Macbeth's witches with fortune cookies and the kingdom of Scotland with an almost unpopulated island off the coast of Chile. You can pick up on the laughs through Aug. 24. Tickets: 513-300-5669. At the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, the annual production by Cincinnati Young People's Theatre is Grease, a tried-and-true musical about kids in the ’50s at Rydell High. Sixty years haven't dimmed the musicality of the show, and the youthful performers will bring this one to life if you're in the mood for a classic. It wraps up with a matinee on Sunday. Tickets: 513-241-6550. While the Cincinnati Symphony's LumenoCity isn't exactly theater, the performances in Washington Park on Saturday and Sunday evening — with a dazzling light show on the facade of Music Hall — will definitely be theatrical. It's the debut for Louis Langree as the CSO's new music director, and the program will feature performers from Cincinnati Ballet and Cincinnati Opera. But the big deal is the colorful illumination that will let you see historic Music Hall in a light you've never imagined. It's free, starting at 8:30 p.m. both nights; big crowds are expected, so come early. Don't you wish the streetcar were already here so you could ride it to Over-the-Rhine?
 
 

An Avalanche of Hilarity

0 Comments · Friday, July 26, 2013
Almost a century ago, British novelist John Buchan wrote a potboiler about espionage and double-dealing. Twenty years later in 1935, film director Alfred Hitchcock turned The 39 Steps into a much-admired cinematic thriller.  

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