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Sports Editors Quit, Buyout Near at 'Enquirer'

0 Comments · Friday, March 30, 2012
The Enquirer’s top two sports editors are resigning from the newspaper, and 26 other staffers reportedly are ready to depart soon. Assistant Managing Editor/Sports Barry Forbis and Deputy Sports Editor Rory Glynn announced their resignations last week in separate emails to fellow staffers.   
by Danny Cross 02.24.2012
Posted In: 2012 Election, President Obama, Science, Sports, Police at 09:55 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

The Enquirer today looks into an issue CityBeat investigated back in May of last year — the ongoing debate weighing the danger police pursuits pose to innocent bystanders and the police officers themselves. Our story referenced the March 16, 2011 deaths of a downtown taxi driver and his passenger when a fleeing suspect broadsided the taxi. In that case, the Cincinnati Police Department determined that police had followed the department’s pursuit policy. The Enquirer’s story suggests that Cincinnati Police routinely fail to follow the pursuit policy and that crashes and injuries during police chases occur more here than the national average. President Obama dropped $90 mil on a couple of local non-profit development companies. Cincinnati Center City Development Corp. (3CDC) and the Uptown Consortium were awarded $50 million and $40 million tax credits, respectively, by the U.S. Department of the Treasury as part of a program aimed at spurring retail and residential growth. 3CDC says it plans to create a rock climbing wall/juice bar/light-free techno dance hall in order to draw more YPs to the area. (Just kidding.) P&G plans to cut 5,700 jobs next year (and we just had our resumes all cleaned up to prove we could write the best stories about how Tide makes clothing — and life — better for everyone…). A 15-year-old Milford High School freshman named Eben Christian Franckewitz has advanced to next Thursday’s live episode of American Idol. Franckewitz is reportedly the first area reside to become one of the 24 Idol semifinalists. Pick it up, area talented people! The New York Police Department is defending its recent practice of spying on mosques using tactics it normally reserves for criminal organizations. The AP got a hold of documents that showed police "collecting the license plates of worshipers, monitoring them on surveillance cameras and cataloging sermons through a network of informants." The new documents, prepared for Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly, show how the NYPD's roster of paid informants monitored conversations and sermons inside mosques. The records offer the first glimpse of what those informants, known informally as "mosque crawlers," gleaned from inside the houses of worship. Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel says his police would never spy on Muslims. Officials in Australia have opened another investigation into the 1980 death of a 9-week-old baby whose parents say was taken away by a dingo. The mother was convicted of murder and later cleared of the charge. Seven Marines were killed in a training crash near the California-Arizona border Wednesday night, one of the deadliest training crashes ever. Officials say it will take weeks to determine why the two helicopters crashed in midair during a routine exercise. JC Penny lost $87 million in the fourth quarter of 2011. CEO Ron Johnson says it’s cool, though, because the company was getting a makeover and those are expensive. On the other side of the fence dividing companies that lose money and companies that make mass of it, Apple is so flush its CEO says the company has too much cash. Tim Cook is reportedly “wondering what to do with the company's $97.6 billion.” More drivers than ever are about to be paying $5 per galling for gas, although if we vote Newt Gingrich for president he’ll make it $2.50.A new study says that global warming could shrink the human race. Wait, what?!? It’s true: NEW GLOBAL WARMING THREAT: HUMAN RACE MAY SHRINK. Great ... just great. Oh, and the UC basketball team beat No. 17 Louisville last night, a big step toward playing in the NCAA Tournament for the second straight year. Nice, one-handed jam, Dion!
 
 
by Kevin Osborne 02.02.2012
Posted In: Religion, Media Criticism at 02:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (3)
 
 
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Tebow, Islam and Bad Columnists

A recent plodding column by The Enquirer’s Krista Ramsey asked the red herring question in its headline, “So what if Tebow believes his audience is God?” Tebow, of course, refers to Tim Tebow, the quarterback for the Denver Broncos who has a tendency to dramatically kneel down on the gridiron, close his eyes and pray before games.Tebow’s showy, ultra-demonstrative displays have drawn some criticism. Although the player says he does it to honor God and get nonbelievers curious about his faith, many people counter the display is more about drawing attention to Tebow than to any divine entity or creed.

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Jeff Berding and Jimmy Flynt

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 9, 2011
Berding resigned from Cincinnati City Council in March, after he butted heads with his fellow Democrats in council chambers and berated them on WLW (700 AM). After Jeff lost support from the police and firefighter unions for his flip-flop on layoffs, his last bastion of support evaporated. Berding retired to the comfort of his office at Paul Brown Stadium.   

Criminalizing Photography Is Worrisome

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 14, 2011
Until the other day, I thought Cincinnati police officers were too bright to confiscate cameras in a public place at a public meeting to which the public was invited. Hell, the owners of the cameras weren’t disrupting the meeting or photographing coppers using excessive force. But I was wrong. One of Cincinnati’s finest took two voters’ cameras on orders from U.S. Rep. Steve Chabot (R-Westwood) or people working for Chabot. It was a town meeting and Chabot was the speaker.  

The Enquirer's Complicity in a GOP Coverup

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 20, 2011
Silence isn't always golden. There are plenty of unanswered questions surrounding the arrest of State Rep. Robert Mecklenborg (R-Green Township) on drunken driving charges, and Republican leaders are hoping the lawmaker's impending resignation will end the matter. The Enquirer has been helpful in keeping the matter under wraps.  

Helping Judges and Jurors Avoid Mistrials

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 20, 2011
Roger Clemens’ mistrial last week recalled a similarly weird situation caused by my Enquirer story landing atop Page 1 of fellow Gannett paper, USA Today. It, too, presented jurors with evidence the judge had barred from court. And as in the Clemens trial, the question was whether that created a potential mistrial.  

Enquirer Does Smear Job with Old Data

2 Comments · Wednesday, May 18, 2011
What The Enquirer considers newsworthy apparently changes depending on what season it is. That’s about the only conclusion someone can draw from the article the newspaper published along the bottom of its front page on Sunday, May 15. Sprawled along four of the page’s five columns of type, on the day of the week with The Enquirer’s largest readership, was a story about how many times a local judicial candidate has been involved in litigation.  

Media coverage of Osama bin Laden's killing raises questions

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 11, 2011
We first saw a photo from the White House situation room with everyone looking intently at something we couldn’t see. About the same time, White House spokesmen said a live TV feed was coming from minicams atop the SEALs’ helmets. Were the president and others watching bin Laden being shot? Was Hillary’s hand-to-face gesture a response to a killing? If yes, how did we got such a phony story about his armed resistance? They would have known better.  

Bill Seitz and Stan Chesley

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 2, 2011
The Republican state senator from Green Township, Bill Seitz, often puts common sense before blind loyalty to ideology. For example, he wants to reform Ohio’s prison sentencing laws so low-level, nonviolent offenders are diverted to other punishments, to save on skyrocketing jail costs.  

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