WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Art: Heroism in Paint

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 30, 2015
Currently on display at the Taft Museum of Art is Heroism in Paint: A Master Series by Jacob Lawrence, featuring the world-renowned painter’s first venture in creating a series of historical paintings.  

Historicism in Paint

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 30, 2015
Currently on display at the Taft Museum of Art is Heroism in Paint: A Master Series by Jacob Lawrence, featuring the world-renowned painter’s first venture in creating a series of historical paintings.  

The Best Art Exhibits of 2015

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 30, 2015
From an accessible aquatic-themed show to installations that emphasized the importance of light, the Queen City saw fantastic and diverse exhibits in 2015, some of which are still on view.   

Year in Review: Visual Arts

Mapplethorpe, James Brown, North American Indians: Cincinnati visual-arts highlights

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 23, 2015
Of all the things that occurred in the visual arts here during 2015, the one that stands out the most for me isn’t a museum exhibition or gallery show, but rather a statistic.  

‘Modern Living’ Finds Fun Amid Function

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 16, 2015
At The Carnegie’s Modern Living: Objects and Context, curators Matt Distel and BLDG present two types of environments for considering artists’ household-inspired sculptures and design firms’ tables, lamps and more.  

See ‘Ten Treasures’ From a New Museum in Town

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 16, 2015
Art and artifacts from the B’nai B’rith Klutznick National Jewish Museum are now making their debut in Cincinnati, which will be the Klutznick collection’s permanent home.  

Art: But There's Room for Discussion at the Clifton Cultural Arts Center

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 9, 2015
The Clifton Cultural Arts Center hosts a group show, but there’s room for discussion, curated by multi-media artist Justin West and Chase Public’s executive director Scott Holzman.   

Todd Pavlisko Collects Punk-Loving Pals for ‘Gimmie’

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 9, 2015
Gimmie Gimmie Gimmie is curator Todd Pavlisko’s homecoming potluck for misfits, with contributions from six artists and 10 local collectors attracted to contemporary works outside the mainstream.   

Handmade Heroes

Crafty Supermarket grows with an inclusive attitude toward all things DIY

0 Comments · Tuesday, November 24, 2015
While attending Kent State for journalism, Grace Dobush took printmaking and bookbinding classes and got hooked on the crafty community there. She wanted to solidify a similar community when she moved to Cincinnati in 2007.   
by Rick Pender 11.06.2015 98 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 09:56 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stagedoor

Stage Door: Playing House

“Florala.” That’s where you are when you head down the ramp to see Know Theatre’s production of Andy’s House of [Blank]. It’s set on the state line between Florida and Alabama, but it’s recreated in two-dimensional cardboard props (telephones and ice cream cones) and decorations (comically taxidermied animals, including the backside of a dog) imaginatively designed and executed by Sarah Beth Hall. The tale is filtered through the often-divergent memories of two guys who were 16 in 1998, holding down their first jobs in roadside oddity shop and museum of “unmailed love letters.” The “guys” are Paul Strickland and Trey Tatum (truly from Florida and Alabama). They serve as the narrators — or perhaps the “recollectors” — of the oddball musical tale of Andy (Christopher Michael Richardson), the proprietor, and Sadie (Erika Kate MacDonald), the girl he had a crush on as a kid. The show was a well-received entry in Know’s “Serials” earlier this year, a story told in five 15-minute episodes. Strickland and Tatum have stitched those pieces together, and director Bridget Leak has given the piece continuity and flow. Their ebullient enthusiasm is obvious from start to finish — Tatum pounds away on an electric keyboard, Strickland (who composed the 20 or so songs) plays guitar and sings almost operatically, and Richardson and MacDonald (both with gorgeous voices) affectingly play two people caught in a looping time warp. In fact, all four characters are living out the theme repeatedly spoken and sung: “Every day is just a variation on a theme.” The music is great, and there are lots of laughs along the way, but the story is a serious, poignant rumination about love, longing and how to move forward by looking back. At two-plus hours (including an intermission) it feels a tad long, but every moment is a treat to watch. Onstage through Nov. 14. Tickets: 513-300-5669 Opening this week: Anthony Schaffer’s Sleuth, a humorous but taut murder mystery is at The Carnegie in Covington. It’s a two-man show about a famous mystery writer who’s out to murder a man having an affair with his wife. There are a lot of twists and turns in this tale, so it’s fun to watch if you pay close attention. Through Nov. 14. Tickets: 859-957-1840 … Playwright Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa fascinated Cincinnati Playhouse audiences back in 2013 with his “sequel” to The Crucible, Abigail/1702. Falcon Theatre is offering two related one-acts by him, The Mystery Plays, inspired by the tradition of medieval theater that dealt with the imponderables of death, the afterlife, religion, faith and forgiveness — but from a thoroughly American perspective. In the first piece, a horror film director survives a train wreck only to be haunted by someone who didn’t make it; in the second, a woman travels to a rural Oregon town to make peace with the man who murdered her parents and her sister: He’s her older brother. Through Nov. 21 at the Monmouth Theatre in Newport. Tickets: 513-479-6783 Continuing: Cincinnati Shakespeare’s excellent production of Arthur Miller’s classic drama Death of a Salesman has its final performance on Saturday evening. It’s worth seeing, but tickets might be scarce. Tickets: 513-381-2273 … Mad River Rising at the Cincinnati Playhouse is a compelling study of place and aging, an old man trying to forestall the sale of his family farm. It continues through Nov. 14. Tickets: 513-421-3888 … Covedale Center’s staging of the comedy Fox on the Fairway, a tribute to cinematic farces from the 1930s and 1940s, is onstage until Nov. 15. Tickets: 513-241-6550 Tune in to WVXU (FM 91.7) on Saturday evening at 8 p.m. to catch LA Theater Works’ production of Matthew Lopez’s The Whipping Man. This show, about a young Jewish Confederate soldier marking Passover 1865 with his family’s newly freed slaves in a crumbling mansion in Richmond, Va., at the end of the Civil War, is a powerful work. Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati staged this show very effectively in 2012. Rick Pender’s STAGE DOOR blog appears here every Friday. Find more theater reviews and feature stories here.
 
 

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