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Event: Art School Orientation 2016

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 27, 2016
For the fourth year in a row, 21c Museum Hotel hosts a discussion panel aimed at the needs of graduating art school students who might be looking to start careers as art world professionals.  

Event: Art After Dark: Swingin' with Solway

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 27, 2016
The Cincinnati Art Museum honors the city’s most influential contemporary art dealer with Not in New York: Carl Solway and Cincinnati.   

Art: International Sculpture Day at Pyramid Hill

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 20, 2016
Pyramid Hill Sculpture Park & Museum has teamed up with the University of Cincinnati’s College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning to celebrate International Sculpture Day.   

FotoFocus Announces Plans for Fall Biennial

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 20, 2016
When FotoFocus recently released information about its upcoming regional photography biennial in October — its third since 2012 — there was some head scratching from readers about the theme.  

Art: 30 Americans at the Cincinnati Art Museum

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 16, 2016
If you’ve been to the Cincinnati Art Museum lately, you’ve seen an early arrival for the show 30 Americans, which opens Saturday.  

Art: Sidereal Silence at the Weston Art Gallery

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 6, 2016
Shinji Turner-Yamamoto, the Japanese-born, U.S.-based artist living in Cincinnati since 2008, has received international attention for work exploring nature in new ways and in unexpected spaces.  
by Rick Pender 04.08.2016 50 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 11:32 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Stage Door

Onstage this weekend

I’m heading to Louisville this weekend for the Humana Festival of New American Plays at Actors Theatre. (You’ll find a report online and in CityBeat later this month.) For those of you staying in town, there are several interesting shows to catch locally.  If you’ve been a Fringe Festival regular for the past three years, it’s likely that you’ve enjoyed one of Paul Strickland’s musical monologues about the Big Fib Trailer Park Cul-de-Sac. If you missed them (or if you simply want to be outrageously entertained by them again), they’re being reprised this weekend at Falcon Theater (636 Monmouth St., Newport). Papa Squat’s Store of Sorts happens on Friday at 8 p.m.; Ain’t True and Uncle False shows up on Saturday at 8 p.m. Both evenings you can catch Tales Too Tall for Trailers at 9:15 p.m., the latter featuring Strickland with Erika Kate MacDonald, shadow puppets … and clothespins. Advance tickets: 513-300-5669 Incline Theater continues to produce adult drama, this time with David Mamet’s hard-hitting (and foul-mouthed) Glengarry Glen Ross. It’s about a group of unprincipled real estate guys competing to be the top dog in a slimy sales contest, selling worthless Florida property and homes to unsuspecting buyers. Their jockeying for position knows no ethical bounds. That might sound like a story that’s tough to watch, but the play — which won the 1985 Pulitzer Prize for drama — uses a kind of word-jazz with Mamet’s rat-a-tat-tat dialogue that makes it both fascinating and darkly humorous. The Incline’s production, which opened Wednesday, features seven actors directed by stage veteran Greg Procaccino. They wrestle with this gristly verbiage, some with more success than others, but Mike Dennis (as the hard-selling No. 1 guy, Ricky Roma) has just the right amount of oiliness and superficial arrogance, and David A. Levy (as nervous George Aaronow) is especially convincing as a schlub who can’t catch a break. Nik Pajic (as brash young Dave Moss) has a lot of fire, and Joel Lind (as over-the-hill Shelly “The Machine” Levine) is sympathetic playing a character who talks way too much as he revels in past success. Mike Hall portrays the trying-to-be-tough sales manager; Tom Peters is a gruff cop investigating the very suspicious burglary in the show’s second act; and Scott Unes has a brief scene as a hapless client trying to get out of a bad deal. Through April 24. Tickets: 513-241-6550. Perhaps you read Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar in high school. Maybe it’s time to revisit it during a presidential election year where the draw of power and the charisma of men who want to govern is top of mind. This production, opening tonight and running through May 7, will be followed by Antony and Cleopatra (May 13-June 4), in which Shakespeare returned to several of the earlier play’s central characters. Cincinnati Shakespeare is producing the two works in sequence with the actors playing the overlapping roles in both shows. It will be an interesting chance to see how the plays relate and diverge, and how young generals become old politicians. Read more about Cincy Shakes’ productions in my Curtain Call column. Tickets: 513-381-2273. Jason Robert Brown’s musical exploration of a marriage that comes apart, The Last Five Years, is told in an unusual way, with parallel stories, one running from start to finish and the other in the opposite direction, from the final sad moments to the joyous beginning. The retelling of Jamie and Cathy’s marriage in a series of solo songs overlaps at only one moment — their wedding day. It’s a fascinating way to track the course of love … and loss. Brown’s gorgeous score makes it all the more poignant. Weekends through April 24. Tickets: 859-957-1940. OK, the final four for men and women are now over and done, both with exciting finishes. If you’re in need of one more weekend of basketball action — featuring men and women — check out Lysistrata Jones, a musical performed in the Cohen Family Studio at UC’s College-Conservatory of Music. It’s an amusing retelling of the ancient Greek comedy by Aristophanes, updated to a story of women withholding their “favors” to get the men of the Athens University basketball team on the winning track. The show had a quick Broadway run in 2011-2012. Friday and Saturday. Admission is free, but you need to call ahead for tickets: 513-556-4183. Wrapping up and continuing: Annapurna, about the reunion of a colorful and dysfunctional couple, wraps up on Sunday at Ensemble Theatre. At the Cincinnati Playhouse, an excellent stage adaptation of To Kill a Mockingbird finishes its run on Sunday, while the contemporary drama Mothers and Sons, about gay marriage and parenting, is on the Shelterhouse stage for another week. Rick Pender’s STAGE DOOR blog appears here every Friday. Find more theater reviews and feature stories here.
 
 

Library’s ‘Tiny Tomes’ Adds Up to a Big Hit

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 10, 2016
Who knew so many miniature books of all types existed, or that their subject matter could be so unusual and their graphic design so beautiful?  

Japanese Artist Explores the Mockbee's Mysteries

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 6, 2016
In a story about Tetsuya Umeda — the Japanese artist whose installations involve sound, visuals and performance — Blouin Artinfo mentioned that he has a “penchant for ‘performing’ at venues with a slightly derelict atmosphere, such as old warehouses, abandoned schools or disused road tunnels…”   

Bring on the Night

Welcome to Night Vale brings its quirky storytelling to the stage

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 6, 2016
Set in the fictional Southwestern desert town of Night Vale, the podcast is presented as a radio show complete with news, weather, advertisements and updates on local events and happenings.  

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