WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by German Lopez 01.23.2014
 
 
news_gentrification_jf3

Morning News and Stuff

Group protests gentrification, streetcar fares revealed, FitzGerald supports death penalty

An anti-gentrification organization says development in southern Over-the-Rhine and downtown is leaving out low- and middle-income residents. The People’s Coalition for Equality and Justice (TPCEJ) cautions it’s not against development, but it supports policies that would seek to help more people take advantage of the revitalization of Over-the-Rhine and downtown, such as more affordable housing, protections for renters’ rights, rent control and the formation of tenants’ unions. The agency behind much of the development in Over-the-Rhine and downtown, 3CDC (Cincinnati Center City Development Corporation), says “people tend to over-romanticize what this neighborhood was” and points to some examples of 3CDC-developed affordable housing as evidence the agency is trying to keep the neighborhood mixed-income.Related: Some studies found gentrification could benefit longtime residents.A two-hour streetcar pass could cost $1.75, and a 24-hour pass could cost $3.50, according to a new model unveiled yesterday by Paul Grether, Metro’s rail manager. The same model set streetcar operating hours at Sunday-Thursday 6 a.m.-10 p.m. and Friday-Saturday 6 a.m.-midnight. Under the model, city officials expect 3,000 daily boardings, but Grether cautioned that’s a very conservative estimate and excludes special events, such as Reds and Bengals games.But the City Council-enforced streetcar delay could cost more than expected after the steel company originally contracted for the $132.8 million project took another job while council members decided the fate of the project. Streetcar Project Executive John Deatrick told council the company’s decision could push construction of a maintenance facility by two months if the city doesn’t hire a steel supplier from outside the region. Democratic gubernatorial candidate Ed FitzGerald yesterday clarified he supports the death penalty, which aligns him with his Republican opponent, incumbent John Kasich, on the issue. FitzGerald’s remark comes after the debate over the death penalty re-ignited in Ohio following the execution of convicted killer and rapist Dennis McGuire, who took 26 minutes to die after state officials used a new cocktail of drugs never tried before in the United States. The Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction told CityBeat it’s reviewing McGuire’s death, as it does following every execution.Commentary: “Death Penalty Brings More Costs than Benefits.”After receiving support from family planning services and abortion provider Planned Parenthood, Democrats running for Ohio’s executive offices re-emphasized their support for abortion rights.Hamilton County Commissioner Todd Portune will announce today whether he’ll challenge FitzGerald’s gubernatorial campaign in a Democratic primary. (Update: Despite previously telling The Cincinnati Enquirer he already made up his mind, Portune canceled his announcement and said he has no final decision yet, according to Carl Weiser, politics editor at The Enquirer.)Hamilton County commissioners showed openness to keeping some early voting downtown even if the county moves its Board of Elections to a Mount Airy facility. Moving the board along with the county’s crime lab would allow commissioners to consolidate government services.Cincinnati’s economy should grow faster than previously expected, one economist says.Plan Cincinnati, the city’s master comprehensive plan, won a national planning award. CityBeat previously covered the master plan in further detail here.Ten major projects worth more than $1.4 billion are in the planning stages or underway in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky.Ohio meets voting standards set by President Barack Obama’s bipartisan election commission, with the one exception of online voter registration, according to Republican Secretary of State Jon Husted.Attorney General Mike DeWine yesterday announced the creation of a statewide taskforce to combat heroin abuse.Virtual reality could help people see what gender swaps would be like.Follow CityBeat on Twitter:• Main: @CityBeatCincy • News: @CityBeat_News • Music: @CityBeatMusic • German Lopez: @germanrlopez
 
 

Redeveloping Issues

Anti-gentrification organization says OTR redevelopment is leaving low- and middle-income people out

8 Comments · Wednesday, January 22, 2014
A new coalition hopes to stop what it sees as gentrification in Over-the-Rhine and downtown, but some locals take issue with their claims.  

Holtman's Donuts (Profile)

New OTR donut shop to offer classic pastries early and late-night

1 Comment · Tuesday, June 4, 2013
Certain pastries may come and go in popularity (we’re looking at you, cupcake), but the donut will outlast every food trend in the history of the world. No one understands this more than the Loveland, Ohio-based Holtman’s Donuts.  

Motel Beds with The Harlequins

Friday • MOTR Pub

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 15, 2014
One of the leading lights of the Dayton Indie music scene is the hyper-melodic Pop Rock outfit Motel Beds, which has been kicking around since the early ’00s, gradually building up a stack of fawning press notices and a loyal fan base.  

Coffee Talk

Foxygen drummer Shaun Fleming goes solo with his Diane Coffee project

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 15, 2014
Laid up with an illness after moving to New York City, Foxygen drummer and child actor/voice talent Shaun Fleming produced his surprisingly lush solo debut as Diane Coffee with minimal instruments and a Macbook Pro.  

Article Menswear Evolves From Lifestyle Blog to High-End Storefront

1 Comment · Wednesday, January 8, 2014
Located in historic Over-the-Rhine is the type of highly curated men’s clothing store previously unheard of in Cincinnati — one that would normally find its niche in a high-end fashion hotspot like New York City.  

Chatfield College Opens New OTR Campus

0 Comments · Tuesday, November 26, 2013
It’s no coincidence that Chatfield College is expanding into the heart of Over-the-Rhine. It’s more like destiny. Since its 1845 founding in Brown County as an Ursuline convent and school, Chatfield College (renamed as such and opened to the public in 1971) has repurposed land to educate those who lack access.  

Local Frame Sellers Make the Most of Abandoned Warehouse Surplus

1 Comment · Wednesday, November 13, 2013
The shopping experience is as unique as the products on the shelves. Customers make their way up the warehouse stairs and are greeted by Baltzersen and her team, who liberally distribute gloves and masks to combat the layers of dust customers encounter while searching for the perfect size and shape frame. Customers are also treated to light refreshments, including a choice of wine to “help you shop,” according to one assistant  

Louis Voilà!

Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra Music Director Louis Langrée on his debut concert, Cincinnati and LumenoCity's afterglow

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 6, 2013
 During our conversation (in French), it becomes clear that the CSO’s marketing blast, “Louis + CSO + You,” sums up Langrée’s vision for the orchestra and the community: He frequently uses partager, French for “to share.”  
by Hannah McCartney 10.25.2013
 
 
homelessness

Saturday Homelessness March to Protest Displacement

Over-the-Rhine, Central Business District march comes amisdt Justice Center debate

If you had to guess how many people are in Cincinnati are considered homeless, what would be your guess? Would it be anywhere near 7,000? That's the number of Cincinnatians cited in a 2012 report from Strategies to End Homelessness that are either staying in shelters or in places not meant for human habitation.  The Greater Cincinnati Homeless Coalition will coalesce to recognize the plight of those 7,000 when it holds its annual Homeless Awareness March on Saturday, Oct. 26 starting at 3 p.m. at Buddy’s Place, a permanent housing facility for the homeless located at 1300 Vine St. in Over-the-Rhine.  Josh Spring, executive director at GRHC, says the march will explore areas in Over-the-Rhine and the Central Business District particularly plagued by homelessness. There will be about 10 stops, each of which will be marked by a speech from representatives of several advocacy groups, including the Interfaith Workers' Center, OTR Community Housing, Streetvibes, People's Coalition for Equality and Justice and the Drop Inn Center. The march comes at a particularly auspicious time for GRHC, which recently helped four homeless plaintiffs file a lawsuit against the Hamilton County Sheriff’s office for depriving homeless people of their constitutional rights by threatening to arrest people who sleep or inhabit the common areas around the Hamilton County Courthouse and Hamilton County Justice Center downtown.  Those areas have recently become the center of a public health debate between groups like GRHC and county officials, who have been forced to clean up urine and feces left behind the homeless and argue they just don’t have the resources to keep up. The GHRC held a protest on Oct. 16 in front of the courthouse asking Sheriff Neil to rescind the policy, the same day the lawsuit was filed. In an effort to compromise, Spring and other supporters have asked the county to at least wait to stick to the policy until the winter shelter opens in December, but county officials are hesitant to ignore the cleanliness problem for that long. Advocates such as Spring, however, argue the city should take a “prevention first” approach instead by figuring out what will keep Cincinnatians from becoming homeless in the first place.Spring says he hopes the march will draw both people who have come specifically to protest displacement and others who come to learn about the nature of homelessness in Cincinnati. "We really hope people walk away with some passion to go and do something about this," he says. Last year's march was centered around protesting Western & Southern's manipulative legal disputes with the Anna Louise Inn, which provides safe and affordable housing to low-income women. The battle came to an end in May when Cincinnati Union Bethel, which owns the Inn, signed an agreement with Western & Southern to move from Lytle Park to Mount Auburn. November is National Homeless Awareness Month. Here are a few volunteer opportunities in the Greater Cincinnati area to look into this winter.
 
 

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