WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Street Life 101

The Nothing’s eclectic, streetwise sound combines every loud and angry genre

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 25, 2014
Sitting down with Northern Kentucky-based Punk rockers The Nothing on May the 4th (Star Wars Day for the non-geeks in the audience) felt like fate. The members of the band (vocalist Jimi Caudill, guitarist Paulie Burgio, drummer Eric Robinson and bassist Dan Snow) have all had a Jedi-esque journey of redemption littered with band transitions, relationship implosions, addiction and other trials.   

Sonic Barbarism

Avant-garde cult hero Lydia Lunch hits the road with a live retrospective of her provocative music career

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 25, 2014
Here’s a clear sign the apocalypse is coming: Lydia Lunch is touring North America, especially the Midwest, with her Retrovirus band and show.     

Countrified Musical in Dayton

0 Comments · Tuesday, June 24, 2014
Country Music can be slippery territory for musical theater: It deals with primal emotions, lost love, heartbreak and gettin’ even. That might make for a powerful musical.  
by Jac Kern 06.20.2014 103 days ago
Posted In: Events at 11:19 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Your Weekend To Do List: 6/20-6/22

Two annual festivals descend on the Ohio River this weekend: Paddlefest and RoeblingFest. The 13th annual Ohio River Paddlefest takes over Coney Island — and the nearby river — Friday through Sunday, bringing hundreds of canoes, kayaks, boats and lovers of the outdoors. The weekend kicks off with the ninth annual Kids Outdoor Adventure Expo on Friday (9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.). The Paddlefest Outdoor Expo and Roots on the River Music Festival runs 10 a.m.-midnight Saturday and the main event is Sunday, where more than 1400 human-powered boats will take the trip from Coney to the Public Landing downtown. Go here for daily event lineups. RoeblingFest is in its 10th year of celebrating the John A. Roebling Bridge, which connects downtown Cincinnati with Covington, Ky. The festival first and foremost highlights the bridge’s historic relevance, and guests can take guided tours of the bridge and surrounding murals, landmarks and statues as well as browse informational displays with photos and artifacts from area museums and organizations. There will also be art for sale, children’s activities, food from local restaurants and live music, all from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday. The fun takes place on Court Street between Third and Fourth streets and Park Place between Scott and Greenup streets. Find more info here.  MidPoint Indie Summer is in full swing. This week’s acts include Those Darlins, The Harlequins, The Frankl Project and Those Crosstown Rivals. Music starts at 7 p.m. Friday on Fountain Square. If you don’t have your MPMF wristbands yet, purchase those on the square and get access to all these killer acts. Summer Solstice is Saturday, and the Cincinnati Observatory is offering a unique way to ring in the season. Visitors can enjoy wine, snacks and a killer view during Celestial Sips 8-10:30 p.m. Saturday. Shannon Depenbrock of D.E.P.’s Fine Wines will sample four organic, biodynamic wines (which means the grapes are planted and harvested according to the moon’s phases) and, pending clear skies, guests can view Saturn’s rings through America’s first telescope. Tickets are $60 and space is limited; call 513-321-5186 or go here to RSVP. Cincinnati Opera’s season opener Carmen continues through this weekend. Performances are Friday and Sunday. Get tickets and full summer opera season information here. The U.S. takes on Portugal in their second World Cup game this Sunday. Fans can join Cincinnati Saints, the city’s pro soccer team, at Fountain Square to watch the game on the jumbo screen, listen to music and enjoy food and beer from noon to 9 p.m. Sunday. The game kicks off at 6 p.m. Read this week’s cover story on the Cup here. For more art openings, parties, festivals and other stuff to do this weekend, check out our To Do picks, full calendar and Rick Pender’s Stage Door for weekend theater offerings.
 
 

Buildings’ Burden

Task force floats new plan to renovate two Cincinnati landmarks

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 18, 2014
Two of Cincinnati’s most famous buildings make appearances on postcards, in logos and anywhere else symbols representing the city are needed. But in real life, they’re slowly crumbling as the region tries to figure out who will pay for their renovations.   
by Jake Grieco 06.16.2014 107 days ago
at 02:55 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
the outhouse

Local Punk Outfit Sleeves Talks DIY Music Scene

It smells like drying piss and old beer on the back deck of Northside’s The Comet. The air is filled with the dull thud of a concert beating up against the walls. There are shows at The Comet every night and people piss and drink there every night, and John Hoffman and Dylan McCartney are there just about every night. Tonight they’re just here to get drunk, but usually they’re the center of attention. Hoffman and McCartney are in emerging Cincinnati Punk band Sleeves. Hoffman calls the band’s sound American Apparel Punk. Their debut EP Sex is Stupid can be downloaded for free here. They’re a three-piece made up of Hoffman on lead guitar, McCartney on drums and Alex Collins on bass. Hoffman and McCartney both sing, and they both end up on the ground and sometimes injured by the end of their shows. Cincinnati has an active Do-It-Yourself music scene and Hoffman and McCartney are major players in it. They organize and play shows and Hoffman even records, masters and puts together records for other bands. Sleeves has played at The Comet, but most of the band’s shows aren’t held in traditional music venues but houses. Residents all over the city are opening their basements, living rooms, decks and kitchens to musicians that want to do what they love wherever they can do it. “I still remember the super visceral feeling I got from walking into my first house show,” Hoffman says. “It was just like ‘Where the hell am I? I’ve never seen anything cooler than this.’ I finally felt comfortable in a public space.” From the outside, a house show looks uncomfortable. There are usually four or five terrifyingly big and tattooed guys stoically staring and bobbing their head to the music. Mosh pits break out constantly, and beer gets all over everyone no matter what, but it’s the closest thing to a bohemian utopia in Cincinnati — anything can happen. “At one show, there was a point where everyone was crowd surfing just so they could tag the ceiling with spray paint,” Hoffman says. “It became a group effort where everyone was holding people up so they could tag the ceiling. That house was a wreck.” “Suffice to say they probably didn’t get their deposit back,” McCartney added. There’s no malice in these ways of destruction and these different looking people. They worked together to tag the ceiling — vandalism — but with teamwork, so it’s OK. The terrifying gentlemen are the first to help anyone up who gets knocked over. For every beer that’s dumped, 10 more are handed out. All the dirt, grunge and basement gunk are exactly what Cincinnati’s DIY bands need. The bands are good enough for big venues, but something is lost when people have to pay to get in, pay to drink and pay to eat and they can’t go outside for a cigarette and walk back in without getting hassled. “My other band [Mardou] played at Bogart’s once and it was the worst show of my whole life,” McCartney says. “I’ve had shows which were one-twentieth the amount of people, at a house or something, and it was so much more fun to me. You connect to people at a show like that and they connect to you.” House shows are intimate. There’s usually only an inch between you and the mic stand, but the intimacy comes from more than just close proximity. Certain houses become “venues” all on their own by regularly hosting shows — like The Outhouse in Clifton Heights and The Last House on the Left on Kirby Avenue in Northside. Communities form around these bands and houses, and people that feel like they didn’t fit in anywhere can find a home in someone else’s house. It’s an Island of Misfit Toys that serves Skyline chili. “At the end of the day, I think it’s just an arts community — or a weirdos community,” Hoffman says. Sleeves’ next show is Tuesday, June 24, in the basement of Lucy Blue Main Street location in Over-the-Rhine. Find details here.
 
 

Northside, New Richmond Music Fests This Weekend

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 11, 2014
The Northside Music Festival, presented by Cincinnati design/branding/promotional company We Have Become Vikings, returns this week for its seventh annual event. For the first time, the fest will extend to two days, offering free, (mostly) local music on three stages at the Northside Tavern (northside-tavern.com) Friday and Saturday nights.   

Coming Into Focus

With a push start from Jeff Tweedy, White Denim finds cohesion on its latest LP

0 Comments · Tuesday, June 10, 2014
If Corsicana Lemonade, the fifth full-length studio album by White Denim, sounds like the group’s most focused yet, it didn’t happen by accident.  
by Steven Rosen 06.04.2014 119 days ago
at 01:28 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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The Main Library's Inspired Idea for Listening to Vinyl Records

Monthly Listen to This! series introduces "Record Roulette"

Steven Kemple, who was featured last year in CityBeat’s Cool Issue for his innovative programming as the Main Library’s music librarian, runs a monthly Listen to This! session there at which the group (it’s open to anyone) hears in new ways selections from the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County’s vast collection of recordings. The sessions have been inspired, sometimes wittily so — North Korean music when Dennis Rodman visited that country, for instance. Or timely — when all of the underappreciated singer Harry Nilsson’s albums were reissued a while back, Kemple scheduled a Nilsson marathon. But even by his high standards, the most recent Listen to This! was brilliant. Using a computer program, Kemple randomly selected 14 LPs — vinyl albums — from the collection. Then, on a portable record player, he played selections/excerpts from each — accompanied by group discussion. The informal name for the presentation was “Record Roulette.” Those present consistently found unexpected connections in the different recordings, and also made serious and insightful observations. Even  when you might think they would treat something like a joke — during an excerpt from The Speechphone Method, for instance, on which speech specialist Hazel P. Brown read pronunciations of words. One person noticed how the way we say certain words has changed since this record’s 1959 release. And careful listening to Brown’s list-reading of words began a long conversation, not quite an argument, about whether she had a slight New England accent that softened some "R"s. The evening started with the album Ballads by Niles, from the traditionalist balladic Folk singer and Kentucky native John Jacob Niles (who studied at the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music — now University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music). The late Niles, popular in the 1950s, doesn’t get much airplay these days and several in the group weren’t familiar with him. Especially jarring, at first, was the high voice — it made some think of Tiny Tim — as he started singing “Mattie Groves.” But as it became clearer that Niles was using different voices to portray different characters, and that he had an operatic, storytelling approach to folk music, he impressed all present. This was a real find. The other records from which we heard excerpts were: ·Songs of Corsica featuring Martha Angelia (It prompted a discussion about the Corsican language.) ·The Trial of the Cantonsville Nine by Daniel Berrigan, S.J. (This was a play based on an act of disobedience in 1968 — the burning of Selective Service-related files — by Catholic activists to protest to Vietnam War. Berrigan, a Jesuit priest, was one of the nine. That was a long time — the younger members of the listening group weren’t familiar with it.) ·“March from the River Kwai” by Mitch Miller & His Orchestra, from The 50’s Greatest Hits (The whistling prompted a suggestion for a night of whistling songs.) ·Africa: Ceremonial & Folk Music (We discovered the wrong record had been in the jacket for who-knows-how-many-years — we heard the jazzy track “Americanization of Ooga Booga” by South African trumpeter Hugh Masekela.) ·Classical Russian Poetry read in Russian by Yevgeny Yevtushenko and English by Morris Carnovsky ·“April Come She Will” from Collected Works of Simon & Garfunkel, the closest to rock ‘n’ roll the night got. ·From the seventh realm, a Modernist classical work from the 1920s by Arthur Fickenscher for piano and string quartet (This unfamiliar work, from an unfamiliar composer who pioneered microtonal music, was moving – and had us wondering how many other 20th century composers are out there waiting for rediscovery.) ·Pianist Ronald Smith on a 1977 recording of Twelve Studies in All the Minor Keys, Opus 39, by 19th century French pianist and composer Charles Alkan ·The Best of John Williams (Hoping to hear Star Wars, we discovered this John Williams is the classical guitarist, not the film composer. Entertaining nonetheless.) ·In the Matter of J. Robert Oppenheimer, performed by the Repertory Theater of Lincoln Center under the direction of Jules Irving (Interestingly, the computer picked two plays about political trials of post-war American leftists. Oppenheimer, one of the chief architects of the A-bomb, was persecuted in the 1950s during the height of McCarthyism for wanting international control of the bomb. From what we heard, the 1964 play had interesting and unusual multimedia aspects, possibly a precursor to the John Adams opera Doctor Atomic. We were ready to end with some silly pop by now, maybe the Chipmunks or Weird Al Yankovic, but instead the computer chose for us Three Short Operas by Bizet and Romberg’s The Student Prince from a Readers Digest collection, Treasury of Great Operettas. Afterwards, we discussed it’d be great to have these “Record Roulette” vinyl sessions on a regularly scheduled basis, maybe every other month, so they could build the larger following they deserve. Kemple posts information on a Facebook event page. Meanwhile, his remaining June events at the Main Library — at 7 p.m. — are a lecture next Wednesday, June 11, by noted Cincinnati musicologist David Lewis on Mamie Smith, the famed Cincinnati-born singer of early 20th century Blues and Jazz; a multi-act Experimental Music at the Library session on June 18 with headliner Wrest, a free jazz trio with percussionist Ben Bennett , saxophonist Jack Wright and bassist Evan Lipson; and on June 25 another Listen to This! session.
 
 

Cincy Blues Challenge Band Competition Returns Sunday

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 4, 2014
On June 1, area Blues singer/pianist/multi-instrumentalist Jimmy D. Rogers won the Cincy Blues Challenge competition for solo artists and duos after competing against several other performers at downtown club/restaurant Arnold’s. This Sunday, the Blues Challenge presents the band competition.   

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