WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Mike Breen 10.31.2014 23 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music at 09:04 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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LISTEN: Injecting Strangers’ Spooky, Fun “Haunted Heavens”

In this week’s CityBeat we review Patience, Child, the debut full-length from Cincinnati’s theatrical Progressive Pop madmen Injecting Strangers. Given some of the album’s playfully spooky tracks (including the two-part horror story “Nightmare Nancy”), it’s fitting that the band is celebrating the album’s release tonight at a free Halloween spectacular at Over-the-Rhine’s MOTR Pub. Nashville’s New Wave Rebellion opens the show at 10 p.m.  Here is a track from Patience, Child that would make a great addition to your Halloween mixtape. From the review: “‘Haunted Heavens’ also fits the (Halloween) vibe perfectly, with its sinister spoken-word passages and eerie choral background vocals. It’s like Michael Jackson’s ‘Thriller’ filtered through Queen, Public Image Limited and The Nightmare Before Christmas and then re-filtered through a modern Indie Rock mindset.” <a href="http://injectingstrangers.bandcamp.com/album/patience-child">Patience, Child by Injecting Strangers</a> Read the full review here. And click here to download Patience, Child for free or a donation.
 
 
by Nick Grever 10.30.2014 24 days ago
Posted In: Local Music, Live Music, Live Blog at 12:07 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Valley of the Sun Tour Diary: Ode to a Van

For the past two and a half weeks, Arnaud’s van has been home for five full-grown men. While we’ve been lucky enough to not have to spend the night in it at any time, we’ve done pretty much everything else. We’ve eaten in here, we’ve slept in here, we’ve emptied bladders (well, only one … Nick was desperate), it houses all of our possessions on this continent and we’ve had far too many inappropriate conversations in here. It has all the comforts of home … except for TV, Internet, showers, a kitchen or any sort of privacy. But then again, some of our non-moving accommodations don’t have any of those things either, so it’s fine.We even have our own “rooms.” Arnaud usually drives with Ryan copiloting. If you move one bench back, Nick sits in the farthest seat from the door so he can lean against the window to nap. The next seat is empty and holds our various jackets, water bottles, candy and other items a touring band needs. Next to that is me; my seat offers no real advantage other than the ability to get out fast at rest stops when the call of the wild can be heard. Aaron has claimed dominion over the back bench, but two of the seats hold two overnight bags and random stuff (mostly scarves that Aaron has bought along the trip). The ride is rough; it seems like the shocks were an afterthought and you can feel every bump in the road. Turns make the van shift and roll and the seats don’t adjust from their full upright and locked position. This all adds up for a ride that isn’t very comfortable or relaxing. If you’re wondering how we can sleep in here under such conditions, all I can say is that touring Europe is a very tiring experience, no matter how fun it is. Of course, the real reason we needed the van is to not just transport ourselves, but all of the band’s gear from show to show without the need for a trailer. And that, my friends, is an experience all it’s own. Arnaud and Nick have set up a system to load and unload the back of the van efficiently at each stop. While I play Tetris at shows, those two play Tetris in real life. Just take a look at this setup and tell me that isn’t almost artistic to see how much crap can be fit into such a small space. This van has been a constant in our lives for almost a month now; while I can only speak for myself, I have to say that I will almost miss it when I get back home. While the ride might be rough, there was an element of comfort and familiarity in crawling into this thing as we headed towards our next show. And it’s the place where we all really bonded as a group — being stuck in a tin can with four other dudes for six hours will do that to you. It’s been a special spot for all of us. But, man, I really wish the seats reclined.CityBeat contributor Nick Grever is currently traveling Europe on tour with Cincinnati Rock band Valley of the Sun. He will be blogging for citybeat.com regularly about the experience.
 
 

Young at Heart

Gov’t Mule brings the music of Neil Young to life at special Mule-O-Ween show

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 29, 2014
On Oct. 28, the Classic Rock giants played their last-ever concert at New York City’s Beacon Theater.  
by Mike Breen 10.29.2014 25 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Music News at 10:40 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Foxy No More?

Successful Cincy rockers Foxy Shazam cancel all live dates, announce indefinite hiatus

On Monday, Cincinnati's Foxy Shazam, one of the Queen City's more successful musical exports in recent years (and one of the city's best ever live bands), announced on its Facebook page that it would be disbanding, effective immediately. The extremely hard-touring band has canceled all forthcoming shows, including a hometown New Year's Eve appearance at Oakley's 20th Century Theater. The band says the split will be for "an unknown amount of time" as the members spend some time with their families and other artistic endeavors. "We truly believe there is a future for Foxy Shazam, that our best art is yet to come," the message continues. "We don't know how long this will take but we plan on someday returning more powerful than ever."CityBeat has written many articles about Foxy over the years, including a 2010 cover story (read here). The band first caught our attention in 2005 after the self-released The Flamingo Trigger, which we reviewed and talked about with the group. Most recently, CityBeat chatted with the band about Gonzo, Foxy's first self-released album since Flamingo Trigger, which was produced by Steve Albini and came after a few releases with Warner Brothers Records and IRS Records. Hopefully they'll be back sooner than later. I don't like that one of my favorite Foxy tunes is now "ironic." (This still deserves to be co-opted by a local sports team … or better yet, the city's tourism board.)(Foxy in 2005 and in 2014:) 
 
 
by mbreen 10.29.2014 25 days ago
Posted In: Live Stream, Live Music, Local Music at 09:46 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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New York Times Streams Over the Rhine’s New Holiday Release

Veteran local group preps for ‘Blood Oranges in the Snow’ release and Christmas tour

Over the Rhine is releasing its third Christmas album, Blood Oranges in the Snow, on Nov. 4, but The New York Times’ website is offering an early listen through its “Press Play” website. Click here to listen. The album, which follows previous “reality Christmas” efforts Snow Angels and The Darkest Night of the Year, is available now for pre-order here. Pre-orders of the CD will instantly receive a digital version of the album. OTR’s Linford Detweiler and Karin Bergquist will do some acoustic dates after Blood Oranges’ release, beginning next week in Washington state. The duo’s “Acoustic Christmas” tour officially begins Dec. 5 in Virginia and culminates with OTR’s annual hometown holiday show at the Taft Theatre on Dec. 20. Tickets for the all-ages show can be purchased here or here. 
 
 

Injecting Strangers Reward Patient Fans with ‘Patience, Child’

Plus, live local music abounds on Halloween and Halloween eve

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 29, 2014
Cincinnati Progressive Pop crew Injecting Strangers celebrate the release of their debut full-length, Patience, Child. Plus, local music-related options for your Halloween and Halloween eve festivities.   
by Mike Breen 10.28.2014 26 days ago
Posted In: Local Music, Music Video at 12:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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WATCH: Trademark Aaron and Easy Lantana's "The Best" Video

Local MCs' collaborative track gets music video, Vevo homepage premiere

This summer, on-the-rise Northern Kentucky-based Hip Hop artist Trademark Aaron released his excellent EP Act Accordingly, which included a bonus track titled "The Best," a collaboration with Cincinnati MC Easy Lantana, the RCA/Polo Grounds Music recording artist who made waves nationally last year with his single, "All Hustle, No Luck." The track about hard work and perseverance now has an accompanying music video. The clip, directed by Franco Mudey and Mark Merkhofer, had its premiere yesterday on the front page of popular video site Vevo. Trademark Aaron's next performance is part of what could very well be the best local Hip Hop show of the year, this Thursday at Over-the-Rhine’s Rhinegeist. Reflection Eternal, renowned Cincinnati-based producer/artist Hi-Tek’s collaboration with legendary MC Talib Kweli, headlines the 8 p.m. concert, marking a rare appearance by the duo. Thursday’s lineup also features Cincinnati heroes Mood, who took Cincy Hip Hop nationwide in the ’90s, Buggs Tha Rocka (who’s prepping a new album release for early December), ClockworkDJ (Mac Miller’s official DJ), Valley High, Aida Chakra and many others. Tickets for the 8 p.m. concert are $20 in advance (through cincyticket.com) or $30 at the door (if there are any tickets remaining). There are also $60 advance VIP tickets available, which include a meet-and-greet with the artists.
 
 
by Nick Grever 10.28.2014 26 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Live Blog at 08:44 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Valley of the Sun Tour Diary: Janky Promoters

One thing that I’ve learned on this trip is that the show’s promoter can often set the mood of an entire night. On this tour, we’ve been lucky enough to have several great promoters who know how to run things and take care of a band, which helps lead to a great show.Our night in Milan did not have one of those types of promoters. Hell, to even call him a promoter is an insult to the concept of promotion. Let’s dive in a little bit and discuss just what potential promoters should and shouldn’t do when bands come a’callin.First thing’s first — it’s always helpful to be at the venue by the scheduled get-in time. When bands like us arrive, we’ll generally have some questions for you about our lodging for the night, dinner, load-in and load-out logistics, etc. This is especially pertinent on tours like this due to the fact that we aren’t even from this continent; a little extra handholding is appreciated.What you shouldn’t do is show up at the venue at 9 p.m. when load-in started at 6 p.m. and not even introduce yourself to anyone.Second, please follow the agreed upon terms of the contract and make sure that the obligations you have are completed satisfactorily. On this tour, Valley of the Sun has two major requests in their contract: a hot meal every night (or a 15 Euro buyout) and accommodations after the show. These accommodations have varied from a promoter’s floor to nice hotels.What a promoter shouldn’t do is tell the band that the guy who was supposed to set us up for the night didn’t show up and won’t answer any phone calls. And this definitely shouldn’t happen at 1 a.m. If it does happen, dig into that suit pocket and pull out some Euro to help alleviate the problem. Don’t leave with your girlfriend 10 minutes later and leave said band scrambling to find a place to sleep.Also, the hot meal part of the contract. Now, we aren’t picky — we will eat just about anything you put in front of us. We’ve had all sorts of chow on this trip and most of it has been pretty awesome. When was the last time you had German cuisine made by an actual German national? Believe me when I say I can still taste that schnitzel.What you shouldn’t do is cook up some cheap noodles, throw about a quarter of a can of tomato sauce on it and use that to feed two bands and their crew. Especially when the staff of the venue is clearly seen eating lasagna in the back room. That’s just rude.The point I’m trying to make (yes, there really is a point) is that tour life filled with crazy circumstances that have to be adapted to and overcome. Sometimes things don’t go our way. Seldom does everything go off without a hitch. Rarely — only in Milan so far — have things gone completely down the shitter. But it’s amazing to me just how many moving parts go into a tour and if there’s one rusty cog, it can grind the whole machine to a stop.In Milan, it was a horrid promoter, but it could easily be issues with transportation or miscommunication with management or the booking agents. There are logistical issues like getting the wrong merch at a pickup (which happened in Berlin) or the GPS could lead us astray. It’s amazing to me that it even works at all, to be honest.So the next time you go see an amazing show featuring an out-of-town band — or even some locals — feel free to throw some kudos their way (and buy a shirt). But don’t neglect the guy sitting at the end of the bar who’s looking a little worn out either.P.S. The picture of the delicious food and the hotel both come from our date in Pratteln, Switzerland. Thanks Z7!
 
 
by Mike Breen 10.23.2014 31 days ago
Posted In: Local Music, New Releases, Music Video at 03:46 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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WATCH: Walk the Moon’s “Shut Up and Dance” Music Video

In early September, Cincinnati major-label act Walk the Moon had its new single, “Shut Up and Dance,” released by RCA Records. The song — which the band performed on Late Night with Seth Myers on Sept. 15 — is slated for inclusion on the band’s next full-length for RCA, the group’s second for the label. The new album is due for release later this year. Today, the “Shut Up and Dance” video was made public. In the press materials for the new clip, frontman Nicholas Petricca says, “Influenced by the plot-driven music videos of the 80s and nerdy visuals of 90s television, our new video for Shut Up and Dance is a trippy story of dork victory.  We are the proud mothers and co-directors of this weird throwbacky fantasy, alongside the brilliantly funny Josh Forbes.” There’s also an awesomely awkward dance break from Petricca in the clip. Walk the Moon is currently doing a national tour (with fellow Cincinntians Public opening several dates) that has largely sold out; an announcement of a more extensive spring tour in support of the new album is due in the coming weeks.Check out Mashable’s piece on the new video, in which Petricca picks his favorite ’80s music videos here.
 
 
by Nick Grever 10.22.2014 32 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music at 09:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Valley of the Sun Tour Diary: A Day in the Life of a Merch Guy

Before I left, I had a lot of people ask me just what I’d be doing while on tour. The best answer I could give them was, “I don’t know, sell shirts I guess.”  So, in an effort to give you a better picture of what a day in the life of Valley of the Sun’s illustrious merch guy/tour bitch, I give you a minute-by-minute breakdown of what will most likely be our busiest day on the tour. What transpires is a day with two shows and 10 combined hours on the road and yes, it’s as tiring as it sounds. 6:30 a.m.: Wake up before dawn in Frankfurt and get ready for a five hour drive to Munich. Take a shower in a hotel shower that has no door or curtain while using a shower head has no holder on the wall. Listen to Black Dahlia Murder to wake up. 7:30 a.m.: Make a to-go sandwich at the hotel’s breakfast bar. 7:35 a.m.: Help navigate the van out of a hotel parking garage that it shouldn’t have logically fit in. 7:47 a.m.: Begin a five-hour drive to Munich. Naps are taken by most. Breaking the speed limit is performed by others. Who knew a van could go triple digits? 8:50 a.m.: Pit stop number one: water, coffee and baked good acquired. Knifes and soccer hooligans are ogled. 10:43 a.m.: Pit stop number two: water and coffee are released, drivers are switched. 12:00 p.m.: Arrive at venue, take tour of stage and see backstage area. Find WiFi password and begin to use and abuse venue’s internet connection. 12:45 p.m.: Dig merch out of van for festival’s merchandise display. Freak out when an entire box of shirts cannot be found. 12:47 p.m.: Rejoice when the box of shirts are unearthed. 1:20 p.m.: Begin gear load in. 1:30 p.m.: Realize you’ve learned more gear terminology on this tour than in a decade of attending concerts and hanging out with bands. 1:40 p.m.: Rip an expensive tour banner. 1:52 p.m.: Sit around and surf through Facebook and Instagram while band sound checks. 2:45 p.m.: Check to see if ears are bleeding from sound check volume. 3:00 p.m.: Walk around the venue and people-watch to waste time before show starts. 3:25 p.m.: Set up Nick’s Go Pro cameras around the venue to capture the forthcoming insanity. 3:30 p.m.: Showtime. Festival attendees begin to filter into Valley’s show (Valley is the first band of the day). 4:00 p.m.: A circle pit breaks out for the first time in the band’s history. Horns are thrown liberally. 4:10 p.m.: Remember why Valley of the Sun is my favorite Cincinnati band. 4:15 p.m.: Raid the catering table for a sandwich, pretzel, banana and water. Plan to eat pretzel on the road as a snack. 4:30 p.m.: Settle merch sales with organizers, collect money, pile up CDs, LPs and shirts to load into the van. 4:35 p.m.: Eat pretzel before ever reaching the van. 4:40 p.m.: Call dibs on a festival attendee. 4:50 p.m.: Wait for Ryan to settle up event pay with festival organizers. 5:00 p.m.: On the road again for another five-hour ride to Seigen. 5:05 p.m.: Begin typing hourly breakdown in van to save some time on off day tomorrow and to give my phone a chance to regain some charge. 5:50 p.m.: Pit stop one. Beer from festival is released. 8:25 p.m.: Pit stop two. Water is released and drivers are switched. 10:30 p.m.: Arrive at second venue where bands have already started playing. 10:37 p.m.: Order a pizza at stand outside of venue while we wait for support bands to finish. 11:15 p.m.: Continue eating; this time it is chicken curry in the band apartment. 11:30 p.m.: Final support act has finished. Start mad dash to load gear in from the van to the venue. 11:40 p.m.: Set up last minute merch area in a now desolate bar. 11:43 p.m.: Wait for the band to take the stage. 11:55 p.m.: Sell first bits of merch to those still at the venue. Try to explain that pins are one Euro a piece, not one Euro per handful. 12:30 a.m.: Show starts. 12:50 a.m.: Play Tetris while band is performing and, therefore, no one is looking at merch. 12:55 a.m.: Earn new high score in Tetris. 1:10 a.m.: Band finishes after three encores. A fourth is requested but the band has literally no other songs left to play. 1:15 a.m.: Sell 132 Euro worth of merch in 10 minutes. 1:45 a.m.: Pack up merch once sales dry up. 1:55 a.m.: Pack up van and grab overnight bags. 2:20 a.m.: Prepare for bed after a 20-hour day. 2:25 a.m.: Sleep for 10 hours straight. If there’s anything that I’ve learned about touring it’s that it’s defined by tons of dead time, punctuated by moments of massive amounts of activity. “Hurry up and wait” is the perfect way to describe it. We rush in the morning to squeeze everyone’s morning routine into a short period of time. Then we spend hours in the van to reach a venue, only to rush to get the van unloaded, merch set out and sound check completed, along with other pre-show rituals. Then we wait for the show to start, followed by the post-show rush to sell merch, load up the van and get to our lodging for the night. It makes for long days and long nights, with little to no rest. It’s tiring, hectic and stressful and I’m having the time of my life. I could really use an actual shower though, that’s for sure.
 
 

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