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Developers Break Ground on Mercer Commons in OTR

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 27, 2012
The $54 million residential and commercial development project Mercer Commons broke ground in Over-the-Rhine June 26, paving way for 126 apartments, 28 condos, 17,600 square feet of commercial space, a 340-space parking garage and a 19-space surface parking lot.   
by Kevin Osborne 04.19.2012
Posted In: News, Development, Media, Media Criticism, Ethics at 11:36 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
buchanan

Enquirer Publisher Explains Lack of Disclosure

Buchanan says 3CDC is covered fairly, despite her ties

The Enquirer’s top boss has told CityBeat that her connection to a major real estate development group was “overlooked” in a lengthy, front-page article about the organization that was published April 15.   Publisher Margaret Buchanan wrote in response to an email that she didn’t influence the preparation, editing or placement of an article about the Cincinnati Center City Development Corp. (3CDC). Buchanan sits on 3CDC’s executive committee, and is in charge of overseeing publicity and marketing efforts for the organization.   The Enquirer published a 1,900 word-plus article about 3CDC, lauding the group for its efforts to redevelop Over-the-Rhine despite the economic downturn. Buchanan’s role with 3CDC wasn’t mentioned, but she told CityBeat it has been disclosed in past articles and will be done again in the future.   Buchanan’s response was sent the same day that CityBeat published a column criticizing the lack of disclosure, and questioning whether her role violates The Gannett Co.’s ethical guidelines for news-gathering.   Here’s the full text of Buchanan’s response: Over several years, The Cincinnati Enquirer has fully covered the pro's and con's (sic) of 3CDC's development efforts in Over-the-Rhine for our readers and we are very proud of that coverage.   As publisher, I sit on 3CDC's executive committee — and did not influence any of the reporting on this issue. Our editor is completely responsible for all editorial decisions. Typically my participation on this committee is disclosed, although it was overlooked for the article that ran on Sunday, April 15. It will continue to be disclosed in the future.   Margaret Buchanan A search using the ProQuest database of The Enquirer’s archives found that the newspaper has published 481 articles and news briefs mentioning 3CDC since the group began its efforts in 2004. (Given how the database is organized, however, it’s likely that some of the entries might be duplicative.)   Of the 481 entries, Buchanan was mentioned in 15 articles. That equates to about 1/32nd of the articles.   Most of the published mentions about Buchanan’s ties to 3CDC weren’t in articles about the group’s retail and residential development projects. Rather, they mostly occurred in articles about 3CDC’s efforts to move a homeless shelter away from Over-the-Rhine.   Also, one mention was in an article about the new School for Creative and Performing Arts, while another occurred in a piece marking the 10th anniversary of the police shooting death of Timothy Thomas.   Interestingly, most of the mentions occurred after 2010, when local blogger Jason Haap and CityBeat began publishing items about the lack of disclosure.   This week’s Porkopolis column mentioned Gannett’s ethics code, which includes such admonishments as “We will remain free of outside interests, investments or business relationships that may compromise the credibility of our news report,” and “We will avoid potential conflicts of interest and eliminate inappropriate influence on content.”   The code also states “When unavoidable personal or business interests could compromise the newspaper’s credibility, such potential conflicts must be disclosed to one’s superior and, if relevant, to readers.”   In her email, Buchanan didn’t address why these rules don’t apply to her connection to 3CDC.
 
 

Enquirer Praises 3CDC, but Omits Publisher’s Ties

1 Comment · Wednesday, April 18, 2012
For a company whose main purpose is disseminating information to the public, The Enquirer and its corporate owner sure are keeping tight-lipped about an article that was published April 15. The long, splashy article focused on the ongoing redevelopment of Cincinnati’s Over-the-Rhine neighborhood and the central role of the Cincinnati Center City Development Corp.  
by Kevin Osborne 04.16.2012
 
 
parvislofts

Morning News and Stuff

The Enquirer ran a lengthy, glowing article over the weekend about the ongoing redevelopment of Over-the-Rhine and 3CDC's central role in helping it occur — all of which is well and good. But the piece, which contained more than 1,900 words, could only find space for 125 words critical of the effort and none at all for a direct quote from 3CDC's critics. (That's about 1/16th for the those keeping track at home.) Maybe that's because Enquirer Publisher Margaret Buchanan sits on 3CDC's executive committee and is in charge of publicity for the group, which was yet another fact curiously missing from the article.Dr. Lakshmi Sammarco, Hamilton County's new coroner, attended a screening of the film, Bully, over the weekend. Her appearance was part of an effort to draw attention to bullying and child abuse during Child Abuse Awareness Month. The documentary relates the tales of several students across the United States who have been tormented by their peers. Its distributor, The Weinstein Co., released the film without a rating after the MPAA announced it would give it a “NC-17” rating for coarse language, which would've prohibited anyone under the age of 17 — the movie's primary audience — from seeing it.Cincinnati Reds superstar Joey Votto hit a two-run double in the 11th inning Sunday, which allowed his team to avoid a four-game sweep by giving it an 8-5 victory over the Washington Nationals. Some Covington business leaders are upset that a current plan to build a new span to replace the Brent Spence Bridge doesn't include any exits into the city's downtown. As proposed, motorists on southbound Interstate 75 would have to exit the highway about a mile earlier, near Ezzard Charles Drive in Cincinnati, to reach the Northern Kentucky locale.Just up I-75 a bit, a new report reveals the city of Dayton has the highest office vacancy rate among the nation’s metropolitan areas, and the portion of its office space that is unoccupied is at least at a 13-year high. The struggling Rust Belt city had about 27.3 percent of its office space vacant in the first quarter of this year, according to Reis Inc., a New York-based commercial real estate research group.In news elsewhere, Taliban insurgents and government security forces clashed over the weekend in Afghanistan. A series of insurgent attacks Sunday left four civilians and 11 members of the security forces dead. Afterward, security forces launched a counter-offensive that killed three dozen assailants, including some suicide bombers.President Hamid Karzai linked Sunday's militant attacks to intelligence failures, especially on the part of NATO. In his first response to the attacks, Karzai praised the performance of the Afghan security forces. He gave tribute to the "bravery and sacrifice of the security forces who quickly and timely reacted to contain the terrorists," a French news agency reported.The trial began today for Anders Behring Breivik, the anti-Islamic militant who allegedly killed 77 people last summer during a shooting rampage in Norway. Breivik, 33, was defiant at the proceedings. Asked by a judge whether he wished to plead guilty, Breivik replied, “I acknowledge the acts but I don’t plead guilty as I claim I was doing it in self-defense.” He has previously said his actions were meant to discourage further Islamic immigration.As the deadline looms for the filing of federal income tax returns, a new Gallup Poll finds Americans fall into two almost evenly matched camps: those who believe the amount they pay in federal income tax is too high (46 percent) and those who consider it "about right" (47 percent). Just 3 percent consider their taxes too low.The United States and China have been discreetly engaging in "war games" amid rising anger in Washington over the scale and audacity of Beijing-organized cyber attacks on western governments and Big Business, London's Guardian newspaper has reported. State Department and Pentagon officials, along with their Chinese counterparts, were involved in two war games last year that were designed to help prevent a sudden military escalation between the sides if either felt they were being targeted. Another session is planned for May.
 
 
by Danny Cross 02.29.2012
Posted In: Development, Urban Planning at 12:25 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
art22973widea

OTR Chamber Announces Award Recipients

Topic Design, A Tavola and dojo gelato among winners

The Over-the-Rhine Chamber of Commerce today announced the winners of its annual Star Awards, which recognize organizations and individuals whose outstanding accomplishments contribute to the revitalization of its five distinct neighborhoods: Washington Park, Mohawk, Central, Pendleton and Findlay Market. This year’s award winners: Chairman’s Award: Cincinnati Center City Development Corporation (3cdc.org) Norma Petersen Award: Topic Design (www.topicdesign.com) New Business of the Year: A Tavola (1220 Vine St.; here’s a link to a recent CityBeat review of the modern and stylish pizza place.) Business of the Year: dojo gelato (Findlay Market, dojogelato.com) Non Profit Organization of the Year: Crossroad Health Center (crossroadhc.org) Individual Contribution: Leslie Cook, First Lutheran/OTR Learning Center (www.firstlutherancincy.org/learning_center.html) Special Recognition: Captain Douglas Wiesman, Cincinnati Police Recipients will be honored at the OTR Chamber’s annual meeting and luncheon March 20 at Music Hall.  
 
 

Cincinnati vs. The World

0 Comments · Tuesday, February 28, 2012
The Obama administration last week gave a total of $90 million to the Cincinnati Center City Development Corp. (3CDC) and Uptown Consortium to fund urban growth projects. CINCINNATI +1   
by Jac Kern 01.31.2012
Posted In: Architecture, Arts community, Visual Art at 05:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 james lee bono

EcoSculpt Returns to Fountain Square

Remember last spring when the Square was taken over by environment-conscious art? EcoSculpt will be back April 13-29, exhibiting large-scale sculptures made entirely of recyclables.

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Best of Cincinnati Celebration

5-9 p.m. March 30 at Memorial Hall, Over-the-Rhine

0 Comments · Monday, March 7, 2011
Tickets are available at the door Wednesday for the Best of Cincinnati Celebration, where you'll encounter the city's best people, food, drinks and prizes ... plus a peek at one of the main locations where George Clooney, Paul Giamatti and Ryan Gosling recently filmed their movie 'The Ides of March.' Join us for the best Opening Day Eve ever.  

Sept. 1-7: Worst Week Ever!

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 8, 2010
TV writer John Kiesewetter has just what you need: a place to complain about Fox 19's coverage of Sunday night's fireworks. Among Kiesewetter's complained about not being able to see the tops of the fireworks. And said his biggest problem was the wide-angle shot of the circles with a star inside because the reflection looked like a pentagram and it scared him.  

Brian Trotta and the Drop Inn Center

1 Comment · Wednesday, August 18, 2010
With temperatures in the 90s, even sitting in a car with the windows rolled down and the air conditioning turned off is a sweaty proposition. So whether Cincinnati Police Officer Brian Trotta last week had an alleged "family medical emergency" or not, it would've taken just a few minutes to leave his police dog with a colleague or a few seconds to at least roll down the windows. Trotta did neither, and the dog died.  

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