WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Amy Harris 04.10.2012
Posted In: Live Music, Interview at 12:11 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Q&A with Lucero

Memphis rockers to play Bogart's Wednesday night

Lucero developed their unique sound — a mix of Country, Roots, Rock and Soul — in Memphis, Tenn., and provide a big production every night on the live stage. You will hear everything from a three guitar assault to a horn section to steel guitar pinings on the band's ninth (and so far most successful) album titled Women & Work.CityBeat spoke with guitar player Brian Venable from the road to preview the band's show Wednesday in Cincinnati at Bogart’s.CityBeat: I wanted to catch up with you guys to try to talk about the show that you have at Bogart’s on April 11.Brian Venable: Well thank you. I am excited about that.CB: I actually caught you guys at Orlando Calling this year. That was the first time I had seen the band live. It was an amazing show.BV: Oh, thank you.CB: I am kind of sad that the festival is not going to happen this year. They announced last week it wasn’t coming back. BV: Is it going to be a different “Calling” in a different city?CB: No, I think it just lost a lot of money. Unfortunately, that happens. It’s a lot of overhead. I just wanted to start and ask you a couple questions about the album and yourself. I know you had the new album come out recently, Women & Work. Can you tell me the story behind the album name?BV: I think it just sums up everything sometimes. It was more of a flip or a funny line, like “Hey what’s going on?” “Oh you know, women and work.” You are always doing something about work. You’re at work or you are working, and whether it’s your wife, your ex-wife, girlfriend, soon to be girlfriend, girl you met that night, there is always something involving a woman. I think it is kind of where we are right now. We are always on tour. We are always leaving our wives and girlfriends behind, trying to just make it all happen.CB: Do they ever come out on the road with you?BV: Every once in a while we will do a weekend. I have three kids so she can’t get away too much, but she’ll come out for a weekend every once in a while.CB: Well you guys have a pretty large band to move around. BV: Yeah, we have the bus right now.CB: What is the best and worst thing about being on the road for you?BV: Missing the kids. Everything that you know is at home. Some days it is nice to sit on the porch and hang out. But in the same breath, you play rock shows every night which is awesome and you tour with your friends and you get to see the country. There is good and bad in everything.CB: I am originally from Tennessee and I spent a lot of time in Nashville and Memphis over the years and the music scene in both of those cities is incredible; there are huge amounts of talent that will probably never be discovered.BV: That is always the thing with Memphis, there are always great bands that will be together for six months or a year and then they break up. Yeah, that is definitely a true statement on your part. CB: What is your favorite track on the new album?BV: I like the “Downtown” song but I also like “Sometimes.”CB: Can you tell me the story behind one of those?BV: “Downtown” is like the happy beginning. The night is full of promise I guess. You are getting dressed or you are having a few drinks, you are about to go downtown and hang out and do your thing. Nothing good or bad has happened but anything could happen, and I think that air of optimism is exciting to where we might end up hammered drunk at the police station or I meet my next wife of 30 years, you just don’t know. I think it is just that kind of feeling, where it is happy and a “let’s see what happens” feeling.CB: You guys just played South by Southwest. Any crazy stories from Austin this year?BV: Not really so much crazy. We did two shows a day for three days plus interviews and in-stores. It was pretty busy. It was exciting to get to play with Dinosaur Jr. Any chance that you get to play with people you listened to when you were younger and looked up to musically is always a fun thing.CB: That was one of my other questions,  do you have any current musical influences that are giving you inspiration today?BV: We just did a five day run with Larry and His Flask. Those guys are amazing and really energetic and fun to watch. Todd Beene who plays pedal steel, he is in a band called Glossary. Their songs are awesome and their live show is great. They make good records. We have been really lucky to be able to play with all the people we like usually. We did 15 weeks with Social Distortion. You are able to grow up with a band and then get to see those people who started 30 or 40 years ago still make relevant music and be fresh. It is exciting to know that you can get to a certain age and you don’t fall back and rest on your laurels and still keep pushing.CB: I love those guys.BV: Personally, I listen to crazy Southern Metal and Modern Country right now.CB: What is Southern Metal?BV: Bands like Black Tusk  and Weedeater. There are a lot of bands out of Atlanta, Ga., and Wilmington, NC, and that whole Southern coast has spawned a whole crazy group of bands. There is Coliseum in Louisville and Skeleton Witch in Ohio. They are pretty awesome if you like Metal.CB: Can you tell me what your writing process is as a band? Do you guys write together, lyrics separately, music later? What is your process?BV: With the last few records, we have a practice space and a studio space we use upstairs. We will come to the practice with a part or half of a verse or a bridge and a chorus and just a section a lot of the times. Sometimes it is a full song and we work it up but most of the time it will just be a few pieces. We’ll work with Roy and get a tempo going and a pattern going and a groundwork and then we just add our parts while he is working on the words for it. It’s been pretty awesome. This last record, which was fun for us, horns came in after the fact and we put horns on top of the record, so this one we actually wrote with the horns and the pedals, everybody was there helping with writing and arranging.CB: What can we look forward to in Cincinnati next week?BV: Eight dudes getting wild on stage unless the night before was pretty hard then it might kind of be the standard. We will do about two hours. We will do a lot of the new songs. We will do the back catalog. We are all going to have a good time just playing music.
 
 

Buz (Review)

New sister restaurant of The Green Dog feels at home in Columbia-Tusculum

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 3, 2012
Some weeks need to end on a good buzz, and I was delighted to head off to a brand new restaurant, Buz, in Columbia Tusculum, as last week wrapped up. Buz is the new sister restaurant of The Green Dog, and as we drove out Columbia Parkway there was a gorgeous bright rainbow in the sky that arched almost down to the diner’s doors.  

“An Evening of Music Video Magic with Feist and Martin De Thurah”

April 9 • Contemporary Arts Center

0 Comments · Monday, April 2, 2012
Consider this sound and vision advice. Canadian singer/songwriter Leslie Feist (better known as simply Feist) is coming to the Contemporary Arts Center Monday, but not to sing. Feist will join filmmaker Martin De Thurah to discuss the creative process behind the cinematic and artful “The Bad in Each Other” music video for the single taken from Feist’s Metals album.   
by Hannah McCartney 04.04.2012
at 09:24 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Local Woman’s Lawsuit Against Archdiocese Approved

Federal judge says suit for firing over artificial insemination may proceed

In 2010, Christa Dias asked for something millions of U.S. women ask for successfully every year: maternity leave. At five and a half months pregnant, the former computer teacher for Holy Family and St. Lawrence schools in East Price Hill approached her superiors requesting time off for the birth of her child. Dias got far more time off than she bargained for; the Archdiocese of Cincinnati fired Dias for becoming pregnant through means of artificial insemination, an act considered "gravely immoral" by the Catholic Church. Her dismissal, though, has become national news as the Catholic Church's penchant for interfering with their employees' personal lives — particularly when it comes to women — becomes an increasingly hot-button issue. U.S. District Court Judge S. Arthur Spiegel last week gave Dias the go-ahead to proceed with her lawsuit against the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. If Dias is successful, she could set a national precedent. According to The Cincinnati Enquirer, Dias seeks reparations for medical bills and other expenses after she was fired. It's not clear how much Dias will seek in damages. Dias, who taught computer courses, never was called upon to teach Catholic doctrine, nor was she the only non-Catholic to be employed by the Archdiocese. In its rebuttal to Dias' accusations, the Archdiocese claims her employment at a Catholic school entitled them to a "ministerial exception" to federal anti-discrimination laws, which gave them the right to fire her on the basis that parents who pay to send their children to Catholic schools expect them to be taught in environments upholding the utmost Catholic moral integrity. The Catechism of the Catholic Church includes this on their writings regarding birth and artificial insemination: "Techniques that entail the dissociation of husband and wife, by the intrusion of a person other than the couple (donation of sperm or ovum, surrogate uterus), are gravely immoral. These techniques (artificial insemination and fertilization) infringe the child's right to be born of a father and mother known to him and bound to each other by marriage. They betray the spouses' right to become a father and a mother only through each other."Also last week, Xavier University notified its employees that it would no longer include contraceptives in its health insurance coverage beginning July 1.
 
 

Losing Fight

Why new state legislation removing a breed-discriminatory clause doesn't matter to Cincinnati pit bull owners

17 Comments · Wednesday, April 4, 2012
I wander through all three dog kennels at the Sharonville SPCA. Perry, Zyr, Rocky, Lance, Goldie, Sage, Sugar, Boomer, Buddy, Macho. Pit bull, pit bull mix, pit bull, pit bull, pit bull, pit bull mix. The list goes on. The shelter, only miles from the Hamilton County border, is ridden with pits because it’s just outside the Cincinnati city limits, where it’s still illegal to own a dog designated as a pit bull or pit bull mix.   

Self Reflection Eternal

With help from some of the world’s great thinkers, local Hip Hop artist i-El finds himself

0 Comments · Tuesday, January 24, 2012
In the beginning, there was Tanya Morgan. And Tanya Morgan was good. Comprised of gifted Cincinnati rappers Ilyas Nashid and Donald “Donwill” Freeman, along with equally talented Brooklyn, N.Y., MC/producer Devon “Von Pea” Callender, Tanya Morgan was hailed as one of Hip Hop’s brightest young groups.  

Space Invaders!

In fall 1973, UFO hysteria gripped the Queen City

4 Comments · Tuesday, January 31, 2012
In mid- to late-October of 1973, just days before tens of thousands of costumed kids were to hit the streets of Cincinnati and surrounding communities for Halloween night, southwest Ohio was under invasion — an invasion that seemingly came from the heavens, and police and government officials across the region were on edge.    

Miracle or Mirage?

ACT scores and a mysteriously ended cheating probe raise questions about Taft High School’s climb to the top

8 Comments · Tuesday, February 21, 2012
In a Cincinnati neighborhood plagued by high rates of blight, poverty and crime, the new $18.4 million Robert A. Taft Information Technology High School in the West End couldn’t offer a more contrasting narrative. While city police book killers and other suspected felons right next door, Taft students are enriching their minds in nine computer labs and exploring the world through wall-to-wall Wi-Fi.   

The Great Eight Debate

City, Duke Energy spar over streetcar construction technicality

3 Comments · Tuesday, March 6, 2012
If you listen to many native Cincinnatians, they will tell you their hometown is different from other cities. Special. Unique even. What works everywhere else doesn’t always work in the Queen City, and vice-versa. Whether the provincial attitude is due to a sense of pride or a neurotic inferiority complex, its accuracy ultimately is a matter of personal opinion.  

Time to Get Over Opening Day Snub

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 3, 2012
I know I will lose any claim to being an actual Cincinnatian with this statement, but I’m not really bothered that Major League Baseball’s first pitch of the season wasn’t thrown in our city. In case you missed it — and it’s very possible you did — the 2012 MLB season began on March 28 in Japan.  

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