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Music: Bronze Radio Return

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 21, 2015
It’s so easy to wind up jaded by new music. In a world where even the “influencers” have blatant and utterly trite influences, where can we find new music that isn’t already tired and played out? Bronze Radio Return hopes to turn up in your search.  

Music: Nicholas David

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 21, 2015
The third season of The Voice boasted a strong slate of contenders, but none were as accomplished or as singularly unusual as Saint Paul, Minn.’s Nicholas Mrozinski.   

Wayne Storm

Daniel Wayne returns to Cincinnati with an all-star vengeance for his debut full-length album

0 Comments · Tuesday, October 20, 2015
Like a modern-day Dorothy, Daniel Wayne left his home and traveled to remote locales to chase his heart’s desire, only to find that his greatest opportunities and potential for next-level success were right where he started.  

Puck It All

Cincinnati-area rapper/DJ Puck has overcome long odds to reach this point in his short, impressive career

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 14, 2015
At 23, Puck has achieved a great deal, with designs on even more. He’s released a series of mixtapes and EPs, done several accompanying videos and is currently writing new material as well as working on increasing his profile as a DJ.   

Sound Advice: Maiden Radio with Daniel Martin Moore

Saturday • Woodward Theater

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 14, 2015
Maiden Radio is a collaboration between Julia Purcell, Cheyenne Mize and Joan Shelley that began in 2009 as a means for the three accomplished Louisville, Ky. musicians to explore the old-time Folk and Appalachian sound they all loved.   

Sound Advice: Vacationer with Great Good Fine Ok

Saturday • The Drinkery

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 14, 2015
Vacationer emits a slinky World Music groove that blends elements of Tropicalia, Pop and Trip Hop with atmospheric Ambient music shades.   

Sound Advice: Meg Myers with Jarryd James

Tuesday • Taft Theatre Ballroom

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 14, 2015
The old creative adage that great art results from great pain is no mere cliché. One look at Meg Myers’ hardscrabble childhood and it’s hardly a stretch to hear Myers’ therapeutic use of cleansing volume and soul-searing lyrical examination as a way to exorcise those emotional demons.   

Sound Advice: Joey Bada$$ with Nyck Caution, Denzel Curry and Bishop Nehru

Saturday • Bogart’s

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 14, 2015
It’s one thing to call yourself a badass; it’s quite another to back that shit up.   

Ubahn, Ladyfest Keep the Music Festival Vibes Alive

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 14, 2015
It’s starting to feel like early fall is the new summer when it comes to music festivals in Cincinnati. This week we have two unique and infinitely cool fests from which to choose.   
by Brian Baker 10.14.2015 117 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Music News at 09:31 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Pomegranates Offer One More Album, Two More Shows

Cincy Indie Rock favorites return with their final album and a pair of final shows. Unless …

After a tumultuous period that included personnel change, a career lull, an identity shift and finally an unexpected and unfortunate dissolution, the members of Pomegranates clearly thought their time had come and gone. But now, in a story twist that is equally unexpected and exultantly hailed by even the most casual fan, the Cincinnati band is taking two final bows on stage at Newport’s Southgate House Revival this Saturday, and one final stab at studio redemption with the release of its fifth album, Healing Power.Two years ago, Pomegranates played what they intended to be their last show. The quartet had toured relentlessly behind its fourth album, 2012's Heaven, and when the band finally dropped anchor, the members began work on what should have been their fifth album."We thought we were going to make a noisier Rock record and instead, overall, it seems pretty low key and way more chilled out," drummer Jacob Merritt says. "And it's pretty long, also, with more songs — I don't know if ‘sprawling’ is the right word."When Pomegranates started shopping their new tunes around, they were more than a little dismayed at the lukewarm reception they received. The departure of multi-instrumentalist Curt Kiser and the arrival of the similarly-talented Pierce Geary infused the band with a fresh perspective, but the indifference to Healing Power flooded them with self-doubt. And with members Isaac Karns and Joey Cook thinking about solo projects, the quartet began to reconsider everything."We were a nominally successful, mid-level band and we had been for a few years," Merritt says. "We gave (Healing Power) to a bunch of labels and managers and no one seemed to care. There was this weird stigma, where people were like, 'You guys have been around so long (the band formed way back in the mid-’00s), and you get on all these great tours. Why aren't you more successful?' And no one wanted to take the jump to help us become more successful. Nothing seemed to happen, and the guys were getting tired of the slow, steady growth and the grind of being away for weeks at a time, so we were very disappointed. The lineup had changed with Pierce, and it didn't make sense to release the album as it was, and we were second-guessing ourselves because no new people in the industry seemed to be interested and we were like, ‘Maybe this isn't good.’ ”Thinking that perhaps they needed to shake things up, with a personnel change representing a good time to implement just such a jostle, Pomegranates dropped their name and adopted the title of the new album as their new moniker."We wanted to call the album Healing Power but at that point, we were like, 'Let's turn a new leaf and just be Healing Power,’ ” Merritt says. "It seemed to confuse a lot of people, because we weren't doing anything differently. We were still Pomegranates, playing the same set, but there were people who were like, 'I don't know about Healing Power, I like Pomegranates.’ That was perhaps a mistake, if you want to call it that.”Healing Power lasted for close to a year before the quartet decided to pack it in. The band's official last show came almost exactly a year ago at the request of one of its biggest fans in Virginia, who messaged the group through Facebook and asked if it would consider getting back together to play a wedding. They thought it was a nice way to go out."Our last show was a wedding in a bike shop," Merritt says. "We were like, 'Why not?' We just felt like it."The reclamation of the Healing Power album began with Merritt's friend Ben Wittkugel, who had become interested in the music industry while a student at Indiana University. Knowing Pomegranates were sitting on an unreleased album, Wittkugel proposed an interesting idea."He wanted to start a cassette tape label to go hand-in-hand with a concert promotion company he was trying to get started," Merritt says. “He wanted to put this thing out and we were like, 'Sure. Whatever.’ ”Wittkugel will release somewhere in the neighborhood of 100 first-edition cassette copies of Healing Power through his Winspear label, and the band has pressed up about 100 CDs — there's also a four-song vinyl EP of re-recorded tracks and one song that was dropped from the album ("I don't know why we were so adamant about not having it on the album because it may be one of the better songs …") — which will all be available at the Southgate House shows. The album and EP will then be available digitally when the limited pressings are sold out."Unless something that happens to people in the movies happens to us," Merritt clarifies with a laugh.Merritt's description of Healing Power as sprawling is appropriate; the album has several propulsive moments, including the staggering, stuttering majesty of the seven minute "Hand of Death" and the tribal electric blast of "House of My Mortal Father." There is also a fairly diverse dynamic across Healing Power's 13 cuts, which careen from those spurts of high energy to atmospheric and moody Pop confections, like the gentle and aptly titled "Taking It Easy" and the melancholic reverie of "Morning Light," with the strolling bounce of the title track finding the middle ground between those stylistic ends of the spectrum. Logically, Healing Power stands as a natural progression from Heaven, which the band also thought would be louder and less constrained, and it also reveals Pomegranates' impending solo directions, as the majority of the album consists of songs that Karns and Cook brought to the band in more or less completed form."In the past, it was 80% Pomegranates, 20% their songs, and this time it's probably 40% Pomegranates and 60% their songs," Merritt says. “It's hard to know, because you perceive it differently than other people perceive it, because you're so close to it. In my mind, (Healing Power) seems less reverb-y and more introspective. Not that there's not a few moments that are a little more up-tempo."Although Pomegranates splintered at the end, there's no hard feelings among the band members; they continue to work and hang together ("We've been in each other's weddings …"). Cook and Geary are working on Cook's solo project, Merritt runs the Sabbath Recording — where Karns also works, including on a recent project with Aaron Collins — and he keeps a busy schedule recording local bands like Dark Colour and The Yugos, as well as bands outside of the area.Pomegranates' live return has generated a huge buzz, with the Southgate show selling out so quickly that the band added a second, earlier show to the slate (both of which will be opened by Keeps). That response begs the question of any possible consideration for maintaining Pomegranates as a side project going forward."I would say, ‘We'll see,’ ” Merritt says, diplomatically. "Obviously, we aren't opposed to things happening if and when the time arises to play a show here or there. Beyond that, I'm not really sure."The band's two shows will be structured the same, with older catalog material comprising the first half of the set and songs from Healing Power populating the second half, which will also be distinguished by an appearance from Kiser, who will join the lineup to play the new songs.Given the fact that these two shows could represent the last time Pomegranates play together for the foreseeable future, though they also seem to be keeping their options open, there is both very little and potentially quite a lot at stake with the release of Healing Power. Still, the band members are happy to just live in the moment and cherish the memory of the impact they've had to this point."I know how difficult it is for a band to find their audience and to play music for people," Merritt says, philosophically. "To know that our music has meant enough to people that, if even 30 people showed up for one show, it's like, 'Cool, you guys still care.' But when you hear stories about people who were suicidal and they heard your music and it changed their lives and they credit you as a piece of why they're still alive — those sorts of things are really awesome. There's people coming from Chicago and Virginia and Michigan and North Carolina (for the Southgate shows). It's cool. We found people that our music really resonated with."Tickets for Pomegranates’ 9 p.m. Southgate House Revival show Saturday are sold out, but some remain for the 5:30 p.m. show here. 
 
 

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