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Ed Conley 1927-2012

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 25, 2012
Covington native and legendary bassist on numerous crucial sessions done for Cincinnati’s King Records, Ed Conley, passed away on Jan. 5 at the age of 84. Following the private memorial for family a couple of weeks ago, friends and admirers this Thursday will gather at the Gwen Mooney Funeral Home (inside Spring Grove Cemetery at 4521 Spring Grove Ave.) at 1 p.m. for a public ceremony.  

Breaking Ground for Groundbreakers

Legendary guitarist Steve Cropper honors influence of King Records’ 5 Royales

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 17, 2011
The list of Cincinnati’s King Records acts whose influence on future musicians — often some of the greats of Rock & Roll — has proved greater than their own enduring fame is still growing longer. The latest addition is Lowman “Pete” Pauling and The “5” Royales. The Rhythm & Blues vocal group recorded for King from 1954-1959 and was unusual in that Pauling, besides singing bass, played a stinging, bluesy lead electric guitar.  

A Royal Revival for King Records

Appreciation for pioneering Cincinnati-based label continues to grow

1 Comment · Wednesday, November 17, 2010
For years, Rock historians have said the reason Cincinnati's King Records doesn't have the enduring public regard that, say, Detroit's Motown or Memphis' Sun labels have is because it didn't have a readily identifiable sound. King recorded too many kinds of music — even too many kinds of R&B, its greatest strength — and so for every James Brown or Hank Ballard classic there was less distinguished stuff. But a new theory is emerging.  

Herzog Is Hallowed Ground

Historical marker honors recording studio with vital ties to Hank Williams and popular music's very evolution

0 Comments · Monday, November 16, 2009
"Lovesick Blues" became the most important song in Hank Williams' career and one of the most influential singles in Country and Pop music history. And it was recorded in downtown Cincinnati on Dec. 22, 1948, at E.T. Herzog Recording Company, on the second floor of 811 Race St. In all, the "father of contemporary Country music" would record eight songs there. Yes, before Nashville had Music Row (and even before King Records made its mark) Cincinnati had Herzog on Race.  

Not Bad at All

Bad Veins, Seedy Seeds takes top honors at rockin' CEA show

0 Comments · Monday, November 23, 2009
The music of Cincinnati (past, present and future) was on glorious display at Covington's Madison Theater Nov. 22 at the 2009 Cincinnati Entertainment Awards for Music. The "bar" ambiance (and Kentucky's love of smoking) kept everyone inside, though we heard many of the old "my clothes and hair smell" complaints. Fear not: Official CEA 2010 gasmasks and Hazmat suits are being produced as you read this.  

It’s Good to Be Kings

Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings draw influence from music created in the Queen City

0 Comments · Monday, May 10, 2010
In a feature in The New York Times Magazine, Gabriel Roth — co-owner of Daptone Records and creator, songwriter, arranger and bassist (under the name Bosco Mann) for the increasingly successful retro-Soul/Funk band Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings — recalled the great music he listened to in college: James Brown's work for Cincinnati's King Records. Roth had a specific fondness for Brown's 'Gettin' Down to It,' a 1969 album he recorded with (as Roth told writer Saki Knafo) "these white Jazz guys" — the Dee Felice Trio.  

King Records Celebration (2008)

Cincinnati label/studio gets overdue acknowledgement from the music world

0 Comments · Monday, November 2, 2009
It isn't exactly be the sort of historical marker you'd stumble upon while taking a stroll. It's found at the end of a dreary industrial street in Evanston, fixed to a pole in front of a poop-brown abandoned warehouse overlooking cars whizzing by on I-71. But someone who comes upon it next week (or in years to come) will likely do a double-take reading what happened in that crumbling building where King Records became The King of Them All.   

Fit for a King

John Hartley Fox's new book looks at the history of King Records

0 Comments · Tuesday, October 20, 2009
As Jon Hartley Fox made his scheduled appearance at a Books by the Banks event at the Duke Energy Center Oct. 17, the many years the Dayton native had spent writing the just-published 'King of the Queen City: The Story of King Records' had finally paid off. This book was a daunting task.  

Jackie, Oh!

One of Rock's first female singer/songwriters had early local ties

0 Comments · Tuesday, September 8, 2009
Sometimes musicians have to leave the Midwest to get better — they need more ideas than any one region can provide. That was the case with Jackie DeShannon, whose long career has included such hit recordings as the Bacharach/David composition "What the World Needs Now" and her own "Put a Little Love in Your Heart." The native of rural Hazel, Ky., cut her earliest singles at King Records in Cincinnati.  

Bootsy Helps Us Eat, Drink, Look, Learn

Bootsy's restaurant offers exhibits representing Cincy's rich musical history

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 17, 2009
Finally, a slice of Cincinnati music history gets enshrined. While there have been temporary exhibits in recent years on our music lore at the public library and the Contemporary Arts Center, there has never been a permanent historical display. There is one now — in the lobby of the new Bootsy's restaurant downtown.  

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