WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Nov. 23-29: Worst Week Ever!

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 30, 2011
If you know anything about integral calculus, then you know that the area under a curve represents volume, while the slope is the acceleration at any given point (on a different type of curve, ha!). But if you think you know enough about integral calculus to prove these statements wrong then, sorry, but you don’t have any credibility because you’re probably drunk, as two new studies have found a correlation between intelligence and a thirst for alcohol.   

How the Media Covers the Poor Follows America's Treatment of the Poor

0 Comments · Tuesday, December 7, 2010
Was the man who burned to death trying to stay warm in Queensgate, William Floyd, another throwaway Cincinnatian? Had he died in a house fire in a better neighborhood, we probably would have learned about his family, his education, trade or profession, his military service, health/mental problems, possible addictions or alcoholism and funeral/burial plans. We might even have learned what bank was accepting donations for his funeral. [Thanks to Kevin Osborne's Dec. 2 blog post on CityBeat.com, I do know some of that information now about Floyd.]  

A Simmons Tizzy, The Black Eyed Keys, Willy O

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 20, 2010
You start a kick-ass Blues/Rock duo, work hard building a “cult” following and become commercially successful and make music so amazing even MTV can’t ignore it. The video is so great, it wins a "Breakthrough Video" VMA> So, The Black Keys, nothing can kill the high you’re on, right? Well, nothing except finally receiving your award, only to find that the name is, ahem, “misspelled” as “The Black Eyed Peas.”  

Covering the Science Beat for an Increasingly Anti-Science Audience

2 Comments · Monday, March 15, 2010
In today's cultural, intellectual and financial world, I can't imagine a media job with less potential than science reporter. When your sources become objects of public scorn and ridicule, what's to write? In a nation accustomed to seeking simple answers to complex questions and a culture increasingly driven by belief rather than evidence, scientists today often are trying to communicate with the willfully deaf.  

The Enquirer Does Less With Less, Loses Circulation

0 Comments · Monday, December 21, 2009
Life can be tough at the top of the Enquirer food chain. Circulation (printed papers sold) continues to decline. The paper has retired, bought out and fired just about everyone it can to cut costs. More unpaid furloughs are likely. I have no idea how profitable The Enquirer remains. The paper doesn't say. It never does, at least publicly. Yet its slumping core paid circulation doesn't encourage optimism.  

Whom Would a Federal Shield Law Shield?

0 Comments · Tuesday, October 27, 2009
Congress is considering a federal shield law for journalists whose sources, notes, unused images and testimony sometimes are demanded by federal courts and officials. At its most basic level, a shield must protect reporters' promises of confidentiality to sources. Otherwise, reporters will have to choose between breaking their promise or jail. State laws provide some shield but not in federal proceedings. Still, I'm no fan of shield laws.  

Analyzing the Media's Lazy Reporting on ACORN

0 Comments · Tuesday, October 13, 2009
Last fall ACORN's alleged promotion of voter registration fraud and voter fraud got lots of media attention during the 2008 election campaign. The right wing's assault on ACORN and news media complicity are the subjects of an independent media study by Peter Dreier and Christopher Martin: "Manipulating the Public Agenda: Why ACORN was in the news and what the news got wrong."  

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