What should I be doing instead of this?
 
WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Hannah McCartney 07.18.2013
Posted In: Poverty, Food Deserts, Spending, Health care, Health at 03:34 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Report: Ubiquity of Healthy Food Directly Tied to Obesity Rates

Rural areas could benefit from improved corner stores

A report conducted by researchers at East Carolina University in North Carolina, released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), sheds some interesting light on patterns in the availability of healthy food in different geographic regions and concludes that amping up corner stores that traditionally peddle junk food could be key in improving public health and national obesity rates. The study focused heavily on the availability of healthy foods such as fresh produce in corner stores across the state in urban, suburban and rural areas. The findings suggest that there are higher rates of obesity in rural areas of the United States than in urban or suburban areas, speculating that because rural residents tend to live farther from supermarkets, they may rely more on junk food from corner stores (like gas stations) or fast food. Where rural areas did have healthy food available, it tended to be of lower quality than other more populated areas. People aren’t averse to healthy foods, according to the study. When researchers surveyed shoppers and management at rural corner stores, they found a dichotomy in the perception of demand for healthy foods between the two groups. Store managers said they’d be interested in stocking healthy foods, but didn’t think there was a high enough demand to do so; shoppers told researchers they’d be likely to buy produce at a corner store and attributed the lack of fresh fruits and vegetables in their diets to the lack of accessibility at the stores they frequented. Obesity as a result of poor access to healthy food is not just a rural phenomenon, however. Some urban neighborhoods, particularly those that are low-income, also suffer from alarmingly high obesity rates. Avondale, which is considered a “food desert” by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, has long been dealing with a severe obesity problem, according to Avondale Community Council President Patricia Milton. CityBeat reported on Cincinnati’s efforts to eliminate food deserts and improve selections at corner stores here. Obesity is a detrimental public health problem that costs the U.S. approximately $190 billion per year in health care expenses, according to a report from the Harvard School of Public Health. It’s directly associated with harmful health conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, some cancers and overall reductions in life spans. According to the Harvard researchers, if obesity trends continue, obesity-related medical costs could rise by up to $66 billion by 2030. University of Cincinnati professor Michael Widener told CityBeat in June about his research to analyze the way a number of different economic and social factors play into eating habits in different geographical regions, which could eventually help paint a better picture of how to establish strong and healthy networks of groceries and possibly improve obesity rates and public health. The Center for Closing the Health Gap (CCHG), a local nonprofit working toward health equality, is currently working on identifying grocery stores which may be eligible to receive incentivizing funds from the Cincinnati Fresh Food Retail Financing Fund, which could bring grocery stores to underserved neighborhoods such as Avondale. CCHG is also working on the pilot phases of its Healthy Corner Store Initiative, which could provide corner store owners with the education and technical assistance to start selling more healthful foods. To find out if where you're living qualifies as a "food desert," click here.
 
 

In Defense of Lobsters

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 19, 2013
This happens to me like clockwork around the start of summer, when the weekend air is pregnant with the fumes of grills and charred hamburgers. You don’t really want it, I tell myself; sometimes I’ll even linger in front of the meat displays at Findlay Market, a stomach-twister on command: no, no, no.   

31 Farmers Markets

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 12, 2013
Farmers markets with fresh produce and local goodness abound for every day of the week, each market with its own distinct neighborhood flavor.   

Melting Away

Chilled summer treats from across the Tristate

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 12, 2013
 Looking for the best places to indulge this summer? Try out any of these local frozen treat shops for a hearty dip into the many innovative chilled foods Cincinnati has to offer.   

Grilling with Dad

In honor of Father's Day, CityBeat staffers get lesssons about the art of grilling from their pops

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 12, 2013
The real secret is, don’t ask them what they want or how they want it. Just cook it and give it to them. But make them wait for it — plan to have it ready about 45 minutes to an hour later than expected and they will enjoy it much more.  

Cincinnati vs. The World 05.29.2013

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 29, 2013
Greek yogurt production — a $2 billion industry that continues to grow — produces acid whey runoff unlike normal yogurt production that is killing mass aquatic life by sucking the oxygen out of streams and rivers. WORLD -2     
by German Lopez 05.17.2013
Posted In: News, Budget, Economy, Health at 09:10 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
city hall

Morning News and Stuff

Public safety layoffs reduced, state unemployment drops, county agency wins award

Council members Roxanne Qualls and Chris Seelbach proposed a motion yesterday that would reduce the amount of police layoffs to 25 and eliminate all firefighter layoffs previously proposed in budget plans for fiscal year 2014. The huge layoff reduction comes despite months of warning from the city administration that the city would have to carry out big public safety layoffs without the parking plan, which is currently stalled in court. But it’s come with large cuts and shifted priorities in other areas of the budget, such as reduced funding to parks, health, human services, parades and outside agencies. (For example, the Health Department warned that cuts to its services could lead to more rats and bedbugs.) The motion from Qualls and Seelbach came just in time for last night’s public hearing, which mostly focused on the cuts to parks and public safety. Ohio’s unemployment rate was 7.0 percent in April, down from 7.1 percent the month before, thanks to increases in the amount of people employed and decreases in the amount of people unemployed. The gains coincided with decent job growth throughout the rest of the nation in April, which dropped nationwide unemployment from 7.6 percent to 7.5 percent. But the state gains were fairly mixed, and the amount of construction, professional and business services and federal and local government jobs actually dropped. The mixed, slow growth helps explain why conservative and liberal think tanks seemingly disagree with Gov. John Kasich that Ohio is undergoing an “economic miracle.” The Hamilton County Public Health’s (HCPH) food protection program is apparently the best in the United States and Canada. The Conference for Food Protection awarded the program the 2013 Samuel J. Crumbine Consumer Protection Award, which “recognizes unsurpassed achievement in providing outstanding food protection services to communities,” according to a statement from HCPH. Homophobic Boy Scouts supporters are rallying nationwide today to support the continuation of the Boy Scouts’ homophobic rules.The Taste of Cincinnati and the the Cubs-Reds series may have helped downtown Cincinnati earn the No. 42 spot in Priceline.com’s top 50 Memorial Day destinations. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources confirmed Ohio has been undergoing a boom in oil and gas production in the past two years thanks to developments in a drilling process known as fracking, which CityBeat previously covered in further detail here.Duke Energy hired a new contractor — Southern Cross Co. — to carry out gas and line inspections. Cincinnati-based Kroger developed a new system that will convert food that can’t be sold or donated into clean energy to power one of its distribution centers. Convergys is selling is downtown Cincinnati headquarters as the company goes through big changes. So far the buyer is unknown. Jim Kingsbury, CEO of UC Health since 2010, is retiring. Using an optical illusion to make white people look darker can diminish racial biases, according to a new study. Earth’s super-dense core is weak.
 
 

Brunch (with a Side of Booze)

Damn good bloody marys, mimosas and beyond

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 15, 2013
Regardless of whether or not you have a hangover (or you just start your Sunday morning drinkin’ real early) you can experience the best of both brunch worlds — i.e. alcohol and edibles — at these distinctive local eateries.   

M Marks The Spot

Hyde Park’s wood-fired eatery offers casual, inventive dining

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 5, 2013
A little more than two months old, M uses its freshly-imported European oven as a centerpiece for its casual dining concept, with nearly everything but the desserts spending some bit of time basking in blissfully blistering heat.   

UC Researchers Could Redefine Location of Food Deserts

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 27, 2013
Food deserts are a big problem for many of Hamilton County’s impoverished families, but University of Cincinnati professor Michael Widener is heading research that looks into how mobility can alter perceptions about neighborhoods that lack access to healthy foods.  

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