WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Shrewd Apes

Covington-based gallery/boutique owners crowdsource their art project, You & Me Across the Sea

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 19, 2014
Hilary Nauman and Michael Boyd began their joint artistic endeavors more than four years ago, when they first started dating.   

Carmon DeLeone’s ‘Peter Pan’ Score Soars

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 5, 2014
Celebrating his 46th anniversary as music director for the Cincinnati Ballet, Carmon DeLeone has a lot to be proud of.   

The Technical Virtue of Andrea Riseborough

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 29, 2014
Alejandro González Iñárritu’s latest film Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) poses several perplexing challenges.  

Cultural Traditions Inspire Story of Community

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 29, 2014
 Zvi Gotheiner's modern dance company appears this weekend for the second time in Cincinnati as part of ZviDance/Dabke, presented by Contemporary Dance Theater.   

Larger Than Life

Tom Wesselmann’s Pop art gets its chance to astound

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 29, 2014
As the long-awaited Beyond Pop Art: A Tom Wesselmann Retrospective prepares to open Friday at Cincinnati Art Museum, there is much to discuss about this native son’s controversial career as one of the original Pop artists.  
by Steve Rosen 10.17.2014 64 days ago
Posted In: Movies at 02:40 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
art_craft

New Art World Documentary has Strong Cincinnati Connection

Next Friday, the documentary Art and Craft is opening at the Mariemont Theater. It's the story of an art forger, Mark Landis, who gave his work away to museums and colleges. He was exposed by Matthew Leininger, before the latter became a Cincinnati Art Museum registrar. While in Cincinnati, in 2012 Leininger and Aaron Cowan, curator of UC-DAAP galleries, organized an exhibit about Landis, which was covered in CityBeat at the time.Landis even came to the opening. The film, which is being nationally distributed and has done good business elsewhere, uses footage and information from that show. So for the Cincinnati opening, Leininger and Cowan both will participate in an audience discussion after the 7:30 p.m. showings next Friday and Saturday (Oct. 24 and 25). This poster, with a certain Saul Bass-like suspense-movie vibe, has just been released. Watch for a full article in next week's CityBeat by Movie Critic tt stern-ezi.
 
 

Creatives in Clifton

Performing arts flourish in unique Gaslight District venues

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 15, 2014
On a recent Wednesday in September, the crowd in the foyer of the Clifton Cultural Arts Center (CCAC) ate, drank and talked quietly as the New Horizons Orchestra performed “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” and the sun set through stained glass windows.   

Moby Dick (Review)

0 Comments · Monday, October 13, 2014
Know Theatre’s 17th Season theme is “adaptation,” and on the evening of Oct. 10, the company opened Julian Rad’s 2003 take on Herman Melville’s 1851 novel Moby Dick.  
by Steven Rosen 10.10.2014 72 days ago
Posted In: Visual Art at 09:16 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
gahahl_elmundo_still_high

Some of the Best Films in Town Are at FotoFocus’ Screenings

Since they’re not playing at a multiplex, or even an indie theater like the Esquire, you might easily overlook some of the best films in town right now. They’re in FotoFocus’ Screenings program, curated by its artistic director Kevin Moore and showing at Lightborne Studio, 212 E. 14th St. in Over-the-Rhine 11 a.m.-8 p.m. today through Sunday. This is basically a program of shorts presented in a comfortably spacious room (usually a studio) fitted with big sofas. But two hour-long (approximately) films are continuously alternating in a smaller second room, also decked out with sofas. The one I saw on Thursday, Rainer Ganahl’s 2013 El Mundo – A Classical Music Concert, was a transfixing achievement both film and music. It’s really worth seeking out. The filmed, staged concert takes place in a Spanish Harlem discount store going out of business – everything is drastically on sale and looks picked-over, as if waiting for a dumpster to clear it out. Previously, the building was a theater and you can see traces of its former-life ornamentation. The heat must have been turned off for this event. The concertgoers Ganahl has brought to the place are dressed warmly – one woman looks ready to explore the Arctic at intermission. In the middle of this stuff there is a grand piano. There, during the course of the film, two pianists play – one an accompanist and another a sublime soloist. There is also a young violinist (Rachel Koblyakov) and two operatic singers. The most spectacular presence is the older diva Ok-Cha Lim, wearing the reddest possible formal dress with a red wrap around her shoulders and wrists. She dramatically sings arias from Madame Butterfly and Tosca. The film is split-screen, so you watch the performers do their pieces on one side while another camera wanders around the crowd and the store itself, stopping to inspect the goods. It’s an intimate enough space you can see the crew moving in and out of the frames. You can’t help but think about how, on one hand, capitalism churns out so much disposable stuff while on the other hand art produces timeless beauty. Or, how art can enrich any environment. For more information, visit www.fotofocusbiennial.org.
 
 

CAM's New Director Is Setting His Priorities

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 24, 2014
I was hoping that during my first interview with Cameron Kitchin, Cincinnati Art Museum’s new director, he would floor me with his big, ambitious plans. You know, something exciting — something visionary, something contemporary.   

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