WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Rick Pender 02.14.2014
Posted In: Theater at 10:10 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
curtain call - 4000 miles @ playhouse - photo sandy underwood

Stage Door: Valentine's Weekend

Last night I caught the opening of 4000 Miles at the Cincinnati Playhouse. What with today being Valentine's Day, this tale of a feisty grandmother and her hippie grandson — separated by a 70-year gap in age — might not seem like a very typical love story. But it's about understanding and finding common ground, and what else is that but true love? Actor Robbie Tann plays 21-year-old Leo and Rosemary Prinz is Vera, his 91-year-old grandmother. You'd think that seven decades might be an uncrossable chasm, but each is a lonely soul — she as the result of old age, he by virtue of the tragic accidental death of his best friend — and they find consolation and support from one another as the become better acquainted. Both actors are delightful in their roles, he kind of spacey but caring, she feisty and loving. If you're looking for a good date night for Valentine's weekend, you should give Amy Herzog's play a chance. It happens to be a very credible script, by the way, having been a finalist for the 2013 Pulitzer Prize. Through March 9. Tickets: 513-421-3888.Tonight is the opening for Cincinnati Shakespeare's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Tom Stoppard's now-classic through-the-looking-glass take on Hamlet. Since Cincy Shakes just finished a production of the latter, it's the same cast, but with the royals in the background and two lowly minor characters moved to center stage. Their plight? They don't quite understand the intrigues swirling around them, and they wonder about the meaning of their own existence. There's a lot of dark humor, and actors Billy Chace and Justin McComb are just the guys to carry it off. Through: March 9. Tickets: 513-381-2273.If it's darkness you crave, you might also consider Pluto at Know Theatre. No, it's not about the Disney dog, but rather about unexpected changes in life — like the demotion of the solar system's one-time farthest planet into something less — as well as the Roman god of the underworld. How does all that fit together in a modest contemporary kitchen? Steve Yockey's play is an absurdist study in contemporary angst, an instant of tragedy dissected and set in amber. It's not easy to watch (there's some extreme gun violence), but the show's strong cast, especially Annie Fitzpatrick and Tori Wiggins plus NKU student actor Wesley Carman, make it extremely watchable. You just have one more week to catch this one. Tickets: 513-300-5669.If you thought you'd missed out on Tribes at Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati, you actually have a grace period, since the show about deafness and family strife has been extended to Feb. 22. It was originally set to close on Feb. 16; the additional dates should make it possible for anyone who's interested to get tickets. Watching the fine acting performances of guest actor Dale Dymkoski as a young man who has been isolated by deafness and Cincy Shakes regular Kelly Mengelkoch as a young woman, adept with sign language, who is losing her hearing, will make you glad you made the effort to see this one. Tickets: 513-421-3555.
 
 

From The Ground Up

World premiere of 'King Arthur's Camelot' is the centerpiece of Cincinnati Ballet's 50th anniversary season

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 12, 2014
Honor, valor, love, betrayal — these are the thematic elements of Cincinnati Ballet artistic director and CEO Victoria Morgan’s full-length world premiere, King Arthur’s Camelot, opening this weekend with five performances at the Aronoff Center.   

Upcoming Art Shows Have Great Promise

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 29, 2014
With a winter like this, there’s only one thing you can do — put aside all thoughts about the cold cruelty of brutal nature and look toward something better and more caring: human-made art.   

Playing Favorites

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 22, 2014
Two weeks ago, I spoke to a group of high school kids about being a theater critic. One asked, “What’s your all-time favorite show?” I was stumped.   
by Jac Kern 01.02.2014
Posted In: Arts community, Visual Art at 10:48 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
aaronbetsky_cam_jf

Aaron Betsky to Step Down as Cincinnati Art Museum Director

The Cincinnati Art Museum announced today that Aaron Betsky will be stepping down as director of the museum. Betsky, who has worked as director at CAM for seven years, will leave the position once his successor is determined.From the press release: "The museum now has the programming and staff in place, and the financial stability that will allow me to openly pursue my next position," noted Mr. Betsky. "I feel that I have accomplished the goals that I and the Board had envisioned when I first arrived and would like to explore opportunities that may include or combine my academic interests and institutional experience."The CAM Board of Trustees is assembling a search committee to find a successor. Betsky will assist in this decision. "Aaron has effectively led the Cincinnati Art Museum through one of the most challenging periods in our history and did so while adding new facilities, growing our program, attracting record audiences, and raising money both for capital projects and our endowment," said Dave Dougherty, Chairman of the Board of Trustees. "He brought a vision, energy and acumen that will continue to serve the museum into the future." Go here to read CityBeat's recent interview with Betsky, wherein the the director discusses changes and challenges at CAM.
 
 

New Shows, New Ideas at The Carnegie Galleries

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 18, 2013
New exhibitions director Matt Distel’s first big show at The Carnegie gallery in Covington, Ky., which opened last week, is important in its own right as well as for what it says about Distel’s curatorial desires for the institution.  

Bi-Okoto Brings African Heritage to Cincinnati and Across the World

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 11, 2013
Cincinnati’s Bi-Okoto (pronounced “Bee-O-Ko-Toe”) Cultural Institute, a nonprofit performing arts organization that illuminates Africa’s rich traditional heritage, recently won the African Professionals Network (APNET) award for African culture, community and entertainment.   

Innovation Is the Heart and Sole of Fashionable Exhibit

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 11, 2013
“It’s gotta be the shoes,” Nike’s 1980s Air Jordan ads marveled. And if you ask Cincinnati Art Museum curators Cynthia Amnéus and Amy Dehan which of today’s fashions stand the test of time, they too point to shoes — at least those in What’s New: Fashion & Contemporary Craft.   

Attention, Holiday (Theater) Shoppers!

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 11, 2013
Just a few more shopping days before Christmas. Theater is a great idea for last-minute gifts. Start a tradition that’s easy to repeat year after year. A trip to see a show is a wonderful gift, especially for kids. My earliest memory of theatergoing is my grandfather taking me to see the musical Brigadoon. I still remember it.   

Shrewdness of Apes Gives Emerging Artists a Home

0 Comments · Tuesday, November 26, 2013
Hilary Nauman and Michael Boyd are taking DIY to the next level with Shrewdness of Apes, their new Covington, Ky., gallery-boutique. After participating in what she calls a “makers’ movement” of arts markets across the region, Nauman says she and Boyd were inspired to create a more permanent home for emerging artists and makers.  

0|2
 
Close
Close
Close