WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Andy Brownfield 08.31.2012
 
 
city hall

City Council Cancels First Half of September Meetings

DNC causes first week's cancellations, Council to resume Sept. 19

After taking a two-month summer break — with a week for some committee hearings and a council meeting — Cincinnati City Council has canceled its meetings for the first half of September. The council meetings for Sept. 6 and 12 have been canceled, along with all committee meetings for the first week of September and the Job Growth Committee meeting for Sept. 10. Jason Barron, spokesman for Mayor Mark Mallory, said the council meetings were canceled due to the Democratic National Convention, which is occurring in the first week of September. Barron said many of the Democratic officials in the city are delegates to the convention. Asked why the City Council meeting was canceled for the second week of September, Barron said he didn’t know.Council did meet once in August, where they approved a ballot measure to lengthen council terms from two to four years, as well as a plan to undo the sale of the Blue Ash airport. All of the committee meetings for the week of the DNC were canceled as well. Strategic Growth Committee chairwoman Laure Quinlivan is not a delegate to the convention, but is attending, an aide said. Council members Roxanne Qualls and Cecil Thomas, who chair the Budget and Finance and Public Safety Committees respectively, did not respond to CityBeat’s requests for comment as of Friday afternoon. A special meeting of the Rules and Government Operations Committee is meeting on Sept. 10 — the first committee meeting after the summer break. An aide to committee chairman Wendell Young says the committee is meeting to receive a report from a task force charged with recommending ways to put grocery stores in so-called “food deserts” — neighborhoods where fresh food isn’t readily available. The Livable Communities Committee and Major Transportation & Infrastructure Sub-committee are meeting during the second week of September, but the first full council meeting isn’t until the 19th. Council still has a few big-ticket items it is expected to deal with this year, including proposed budget cuts from City Manager Milton Dohoney (expected to be laid out in November) and the approval of a new city plan, which shifts development emphasis from downtown and Over-the-Rhine to the city’s other 50 neighborhoods. More on that plan here. 
 
 

City Taxi System to Change

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 16, 2012
Cincinnati City Council last week approved a motion brought forth by the Cincinnati Taxicab Advisory Commission that will implement changes to the design of the city’s taxicab industry, some of which will be seen as soon as July 1.    

Your Council Connection

CityBeat’s endorsements for Cincinnati City Council

11 Comments · Wednesday, October 26, 2011
Some powerful special interest groups know a secret that the average Cincinnati voter doesn’t: If you want to make your votes for City Council truly matter and have the greatest impact, don’t use all nine of them. That’s right: Even though you can cast nine votes in the council race, you really shouldn’t.  

Brent Spence and Wendell Young

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 14, 2011
The overcrowded, dilapidated bridge on Interstate 75 that connects Cincinnati to Northern Kentucky got a shout-out last week from the main man. President Obama mentioned the rusty steel structure in his Aug. 8 speech to Congress as an example of projects that could be expedited if his jobs plan is approved.  

Fighting for the YMCA

Residents, council members try to prevent closings

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 3, 2011
A showdown is looming between the YMCA of Greater Cincinnati and a group that wants to keep two YMCA branches open in Walnut Hills and East Walnut Hills. In 21 days the Williams and Melrose branches are scheduled to close despite the opposition of some residents.  

Kevin Flynn and Robert Mecklenborg

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 6, 2011
We hardily endorse the latest idea from Kevin Flynn, the Mount Airy attorney and Charterite who’s making his second run for Cincinnati City Council. Like a few other politicos before him, Flynn proposes that council incumbents forego their usual two-month summer recess and stay in session, working on a plan to avoid the city’s estimated $33 million deficit next year.  

Outsourcing Law and Order

City Council’s proposal to abolish Police Department ignites debate

1 Comment · Wednesday, March 2, 2011
Some community groups are outraged about a hastily crafted proposal by Cincinnati officials that could result in the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office taking control of all policing within city limits, adding it shows a lack of planning and judgment. Critics say the wide-sweeping proposal, which is being rushed through in three months, would disrupt many of the hard-fought police reforms that resulted from the Collaborative Agreement.  

Feb. 2-8: Worst Week Ever!

0 Comments · Tuesday, February 8, 2011
There are only two expected responses when a man is asked whether he has ever cheated on his wife: One is, “It is not true — there is no factual basis for these allegations,” and the other is, “I'll fuckin' kill you!” (More often than not the angrier option is better evidence of innocence.)  

Council's 'Sound and Fury' Is Getting Old

0 Comments · Tuesday, January 4, 2011
Last week's extended soap opera at City Hall about how to fill a $54.7 million deficit in the budget ended anti-climatically, with differing City Council factions temporarily solving the dilemma by resorting to the same sort of tricks they did last year — instead of showing leadership or political courage, the mayor and nine elected council members decided to use $27 million in one-time sources of cash to patch over the immediate problem and approve studies into possible changes that could yield the rest of the savings.  

Pot Law a Bust, Critics Say

Repeal would save city of Cincinnati $350,000 annually

2 Comments · Tuesday, December 7, 2010
As Cincinnati City Council frets about how to close a $62 million budget deficit, some local activists are asking officials to consider repealing an ordinance they say isn't enforced evenly and wastes taxpayers' money. Critics allege that city's Anti-Marijuana Ordinance is being used to target specific races and is adding to the city's crippling budget deficit.  

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