by mbreen 11.15.2012

Music Tonight: Earth, Iris Dement and More

• Instrumental Avant Metal veterans Earth bring their adventurous, spontaneous Dronecore to downtown tonight for a hypnosis session at the Ballroom at the Taft Theatre. Showtime is 8:30 pm. Stebmo, Earth collaborator and progressive Jazz pianist/multi-instrumentalist/composer Steve Moore, and psychedelic, noisy Doom duo Eagle Twin open the show. Tickets are $15.Guitarist Dylan Carlson gave birth to Earth in Olympia, Wash., circa 1990, and remains the only original member in a band that has seen numerous lineup and stylistic shifts. The group put a pair of albums out on Sub Pop during the "Grunge Revolution" (which they had little in common with), got booted from the label briefly and then welcomed back for three more albums. While Earth's aggressively experimental sound didn't quite fit the Grunge buzz, the group actually used the genre's concept of "slowed down Hard Rock and Metal" and took it to the extreme, decelerating even more and replacing Grunge's Punk and Garage influence with inspiration from avant grade composers and musicians and Carlson's singular vision.Earth didn't survive the ’90s but returned in the early ’00s to start a run that has included several releases for Southern Lord Records, a haven for "Metal" artists on the more experimental side of the music. Earth's latest release is the improvised Angels of Darkness, Demons of Light II, the follow-up to part I (and actually recorded at the same time) which has been praised for its gradual, natural exploration of different tones and approaches. Earth's trippy, glacial sound on Demons of Light II is infused with evocative cello and smoky atmospherics and often sounds like a new slant on modern Jazz, something Mingus might have come up with had he been into Black Sabbath. Here's Demons II track "The Corascene Dog":• Acclaimed by both fellow artists, critics and her dedicated fan base, Iris Dement  has been one of the more compelling singers in the Americana movement since she put out her first album in 1992; her mesmerizing voice has a timeless soul that recalls the best early Country female vocalists. Dement's sound has evolved and taken detours over time. After two straight-forward Country/Folk Pop LPs, the 1996 album The Way I Should showcased a Rock vibe and some serious political commentary. She followed that up by collaborating with John Prine on his In Spite of Ourselves album, which scored her a Grammy nomination, but Dement took a break from music after that. In 2004, Dement returned with her first album in eight years, Lifeline, released on her own label after her Warner Brothers contract expired. But Lifeline was primarily a collection of centuries'-old Gospel covers. This year, Dement released Sing the Delta, her first album of new material in 16 years. The songs harken back to that purity of her first couple of albums, but also shows how Dement has matured as a composer and performing. She writes with more confidence and has become an even better lyricist, creating an album that is mournful, poignant and poetic. Dement performs tonight at the 20th Century Theatre in Oakley with The Tillers, one of Cincy's finest Folk acts who are coming off of a successful release party for their recent live album. Showtime is 8 p.m. and tickets are $25-$30. Here's DeMent's "Go On Ahead and Go Home" from Delta. • Milwaukee-based Psych rockers Moss Folk perform a free show tonight at MOTR Pub in Over-the-Rhine with like-minded locals Children of the Emerald Fire. Showtime is 10 p.m. Formed in Michigan in the mid-’00s by founder Andrew James Shelp, Moss Folk entrancingly collages influences into a sound that draws from a wide range of music that could fall into the "Psychedelic" category. You'll hear elements of Kraut Rock, Pink Floyd, World music, Tangerine Dream and Spacemen 3 mingling in Moss Folk's ambient, hypnotic melange and the band has been known to match the lysergic sonics with fitting visuals (from video projections to cameos by various non-musical performing artists). Here's a live clip of Moss Folk: moss folk - red from brownshoesonly on Vimeo.• Tennessee ElectroJam/Livetronica trio Arpetrio performs tonight at The Mad Frog in Corryville. The show starts at 9 p.m. with locals Don't Fear the Satellites. Admission is $5. Bringing their Rock and Jazz chops together with a creative technological prowess, guitarist/keyboardist Alex Mindermann, bassist Trent Little and drummer Wes Taylor have performed with the likes of EOTO, Papadosio and RJD2, as well as at numerous Jam fests across the country. The group's fluid sound and deft use of loops, synths and samplers puts them on par with some of the bigger artists making this kind of warm, spontaneous, beat-heavy Trance/Fusion (Sound Tribe Sector 9, The Werks, Big Gigantic, etc.). Click below to sample the group's 2012 release Triggology, then click here to download your very own copy for free. Triggology by ArpetrioClick here for even more live music events tonight in Greater Cincinnati.

The Tillers’ Fond ‘Farewell’ Is a Brilliant Re-Introduction

Plus notes on The Heights Music Festival, a Cincinnati Music Heritage Foundation benefit and a Culture Queer release party

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 7, 2012
Folk faves The Tillers celebrate the release of a new live album recorded at the former Southgate House with a release party at the new Southgate House Revival.   
by Mike Breen 08.24.2012
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Festivals, Music Video at 09:36 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)

Whispering Beard Folk Festival Starts NOW

Fifth annual celebration of Americana/Folk music new and old begins today

The summer music festival season is winding down, but area fans of Americana/Folk/Roots music of varying stripes have a big one to look forward to this weekend, as the fifth annual Whispering Beard Folk Festival returns to the Old Mill Campground in nearby Friendship, Ind., starting in just a few hours.Founded in 2008, Whispering Beard has showcased both the old and new guard of Americana, mixing legends, contemporary favorites and lots of Greater Cincinnati area artists. This year is no exception; in fact, it may be the best lineup yet. Check the full rundown of performers below, as well as video clips from each day's headliners. FRIDAY11:30 a.m. Easy Tom Eby12:20 p.m. Red Cedards1:10 p.m. Ben Knight2 p.m. Arlo McKinley and the Lonesome Sound2:50 p.m. Rattlesnakin' Daddies3:45 Kentucky Struts4:40 p.m. Sassy Molasses5:35 p.m. Al Scorch6:30 p.m. Frontier Folk Nebraska 7:30 p.m. Charlie Parr8:30 p.m. Pokey LaFarge and the South City 3 9:30 p.m. Whiskey Bent Valley Boys10:30 p.m. Langhorne Slim Langhorne Slim - The Way We Move from Langhorne Slim on Vimeo.SATURDAY11:30 a.m. Jive Creek Ramblers12:20 p.m. Billy Catfish1:10 p.m. Terminal Union2 p.m. My Brother the Bear2:50 p.m. Shiny & the Spoon3:45 p.m. Jeremy Pinnell & the 55s4:40 p.m. Josh Eagle and the Harvest City5:35 p.m. Henhouse Prowlers6:30 p.m. Bloodroots Barter 7:25 p.m. Chicago Farmer8:20 p.m. Caitlin Rose9:20 p.m. The Tillers10:20 p.m. Justin Townes EarleSUNDAY 11 a.m. Rabbit Hash String Band11:50 a.m. The Blue Rock Boys12:40 p.m. Mt. Pleasant String Band1:30 p.m. Ma Crow and the Lady Slippers2:25 p.m. Uncle Mike Carr 3:20 p.m. Magnolia Mountain 4:20 p.m. Ramblin' Jack Elliott (check out CityBeat's interview with the Folk legend here)Weekend passes are $70 (it’s $40 for just Friday and Saturday and $20 for just Sunday). All-weekend on-site camping costs $40 or you can camp off-site for free (while spaces last). Old Mill Campground is about an hour west of downtown Cincinnati. Here's a map from Fountain Square to Friendship.View Larger MapFor complete info on this year’s Whispering Beard Folk Festival, visit www.whisperingbeard.com.

Southgate House … Revived

The returns of the Southgate and Whispering Beard festival, plus a tribute to Bones

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 22, 2012
A “new” Southgate House is booking shows and nearly ready to open for business. The new Southgate House Revival is located at another historic Newport property, the former Grace Methodist Episcopal Church and opens for business Oct. 5.  
by Deirdre Kaye 07.16.2012
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Festivals, Music Video at 03:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)

Bunburied Alive … and Lovin' It

Reflections on the final day of the inaugural Bunbury Music Festival

I’ve been to more festivals than I care to recall, but they mostly pale in comparison to Bunbury’s inaugural weekend. The planners of the three-day Cincinnati festival scored awesome bands for a first-year festival and the location couldn’t have been more spectacular, stretching from Sawyer Point to Yeatman's Cove along the riverfront.Bonnaroo sucks because there are hardly any trees and therefore no shade — it’s like spending a weekend on the sun. While the fairly awesome, Memphis in May offers a similar riverside locale, but it’s also missing the shade and it fails to take full advantage of its riverfront property. The Bunbury planners nailed it. Not only does Sawyer Point offer plenty of tree-covered walkways between stages, but also grassy knolls, flushing toilets and a great breeze. And the Landor Stage! Whatever genius said, “Let’s put a stage at the base of the Serpentine Wall,” deserves a raise. The river and Big Mac Bridge were excellent backdrops for the bands lucky enough to play there and a great way to show off some of Cincy's charm to festival goers from afar. I saw Good Old War perform to a packed … "wall," and it was by far the coolest and most laidback of the shows I caught. Watching everyone lounge around on the huge concrete steps while listening to the trio play music and goof off was a great break from the shuffling and shifting crowds just a few feet behind us. The band's drummer did a pretty great impersonation of Harry Belafonte and sang “Day-o” for us, which worked well with the sunny sky and chilled-out vibes on the wall. Even better was how loud the crowd got when he sang, “Daylight come and me wanna go home.” Hardly anyone knew the rest of the words, but they had fun pretending. Good Old War was probably my favorite performance and Landor Stage was definitely my favorite place to hang out.Another great way Bunbury made sure to represent the Cincinnati spirit was with tons of local food and beer. Not only did they have the big names, like Skyline and LaRosa’s, but they also brought in places like Taste of Belgium and beer from Hudy. (Sure, some UDF or Graeter’s would have also been nice, but it was only the first year.)Speaking of food, I was overwhelmed by the lack of food I saw on the ground, neither dropped nor regurgitated. Cincinnati did an excellent job at keeping their park clean, even when they flooded it with feet. I was super proud (and relieved) to not have to step over any up-chucked chilli on my way various jaunts from one end of the park to the other.And that’s a trek I made quite a few times, too. From The Tillers to Good Old War and then back to the far end to see Bad Veins, I spent a good deal of my Sunday slipping through the crowds to get from one end of the point to the other as quickly as possible.  It was worth it, though, especially for The Tillers!I own The Tillers’ first two albums, but I’d only seen them once before, at one of their usual spots — Northside Tavern. It was a night where they went on late and I happened to be with more introverted friends. It was a good show, but it lacked the oomph I experienced at Bunbury. Those boys were made to play in the sunshine and trees, that’s for sure. And Cincinnati made sure to show love to their hometown band. Hopefully, Mike, Sean and Aaron picked, bowed and bellowed their ways into some new hearts, as well. Their show sealed the deal on The Tillers being one of the many reasons why I love Cincinnati. We’re the kind of people where their kind of music can be properly loved and respected for exactly what it is and never expected to be anything more.Those were the highlights of my day, but I’d say the whole experience was a good one. Musically, there were really only two downsides to the fest and they were both pretty personal. To begin with, I think Neon Trees really lose their appeal in the daylight. They are everything that’s glowing, neon or flashing. They sing songs that, when sung along to, require sassy facial expressions and overly dramatized hand gestures. These are things that are best done in the dark. I also wasn’t thrilled with Death Cab for Cutie, though I know I’m in the minority on that one. Here’s the thing, though:  “I Will Possess Your Heart” is really freaking creepy and “I Will Follow You into the Dark” is the exact opposite of the kind of love I want. I’m fairly certain anyone who’s ever been the person least committed to a relationship will understand my sentiment.Still. Those things were minor. Most important is that Sunday was a good day and Bunbury, in my summation, was a huge success.Writer’s note: There were a few things I thought worth mentioning but not worthy of the effort of a more fluid insertion into the above review. I’d like to add the following whimsy, as long as I won’t be sacked. Otherwise, just leave it off. (Editor's note: These are hilarious. You get a raise — two free movie passes next week!)• Apparently making cut-offs from Mom jeans is a fashion trend. I reject this.• Next year I’d like to rent a boat and spend one afternoon experiencing Bunbury from the river with the rest of the freeloaders.• Seriously. I’m really proud of you for not puking in public.• To the lady in the wheelchair with her legs stuck directly out in front of her: Are you sure you couldn’t find an even less convenient position in which to ride? (Editor's note: This may be offensive; see me.)• I saw a New Kids on the Block tattoo and I still have no idea how I feel about it.• Can we try to get an ice company to sponsor a stage next year? I really hate my beverage lukewarm.• I’d still prefer a festival that took place in December or January. (Name suggestions: Bit Nipple-y Concert Series and Freeze Your Balls Off Fest)Click here for our photo gallery by Jesse Fox featuring over 150 shots from Bunbury weekend. And keep checking the music blog for more post-game coverage. Sorry for the delay — r tender li'l brains got a bit frieded dis weakened.

Locals at Bunbury: A Primer

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 11, 2012
This weekend’s huge Bunbury Music Festival at Sawyer Point features some of the top-names in Alternative music. And it also includes several local favorites. Since Bunbury is drawing music lovers from all over the region, here is a primer on some of the Greater Cincinnati-based acts performing at the festival.   

EdenSong Begins 49th Anniversary Series

0 Comments · Tuesday, July 3, 2012
Though rootsier acoustic music seems to be almost trendy now (it’s a “fad” that seems to come around every 15 years or so), the local organization Queen City Balladeers has been celebrating and nurturing Folk and Americana music for decades in the Queen City. Next year will mark the Balladeers’ 50th anniversary; this Friday, the 49th annual EdenSong concert series returns to Eden Park.  
by Mike Breen 07.03.2012
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Festivals at 09:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)

A Happy Third of July in Northside

Popular Northside celebration returns to Hoffner Park for all-day, pre-Fourth blowout

Today, the free Northside Rock n’ Roll Carnival brings a little pre-Independence Day fun to Jacob Hoffner Park (at the corner of Hamilton and Blue Rock St.) in Northside. Conceived in 2005 by MOTR Pub’s Chris Schadler and put into action in 2006 by Schadler and Leslie Scott, the event is also a warm-up for one of the must-see parades of the summer, the eclectic, eccentric Northside 4th of July Parade, which makes its way down Hamilton Ave. starting at noon tomorrow. If you have not attended in the past, the “Carnival” in the event’s name is key, as organizers present “side-show” fun galore — everything from fire-breathers and sword swallowers to drag performances and burlesque. But live music is at the heart of the carnival and the assembled lineup this year once again features a great, diverse mix of groups from Greater Cincinnati, as well as a few nationally touring acts. Locals playing the Rock n’ Roll Carnival this year are Cletus Romp, Jake Speed and the Freddies, Eclipse, R. Ring, The Tillers and You, You’re Awesome. Headlining is Nashville’s Pujol; New York’s The Big Sleep and Nashville’s Turbo Fruits also perform.Here is the full lineup of event for today's Carnival:2:30 p.m. Cletus Romp 4 p.m. Jake Speed & the Freddies 5 p.m. Eclipse 6 p.m. R. Ring 7:10 p.m. The Tillers8:20 p.m. Turbo Fruits 9:05 p.m. Pickled Bros Side Show   9:40 p.m. You, You're Awesome 10:25 p.m. Incendium Fire Show 11 p.m. The Big Sleep 12:20 a.m. Pujol  The event is open to revelers of all ages. For more details on the Northside Rock n’ Roll Carnival, click here.If you are in the mood for some indoor (read: ACed) music while you're at the Carnival, be sure to duck into Northside Tavern for the July 4th Eve Rock and Roll Riot. Also free, the Riot gets started at 9 p.m. with Downtown Boys. The rest of the lineup features The Cave Girls, TEMPLE, Ohio Knife and DAAP Girls. Click here for set times and links to check out all the performers beforehand.
by Mike Breen 10.27.2011
Posted In: Music News, Local Music, Live Music at 12:34 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
tillers art

The Tillers' Special Benefit Concert Trailer (VIDEO)

Local Folk trio releases new album, raises money for cause close to their hearts

On Saturday, Nov. 19, Mike Oberst of the fantastic local Folk trio The Tillers presents a benefit concert for the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation and the Mike Seeger Scholarship Fund at a Newport's Southgate House. The show is being put on in memory of Oberst's mother and Folk legend Mike Seeger, both of whom died from multiple myeloma cancer in the ’00s. The concert will feature some of the best of the local Roots music scene, as well as national acts, including members of Seeger's band The New City Lost Ramblers. The Tillers are not only performing, they'll be releasing their new album at the show (a portion of the proceeds will be donated to the cause). Tickets for the event are expected to go fast; get yours now ($12) here. Any remaining tickets will be available day of show for $15. Below is the full list of performers as well as a great trailer that explains the purpose and meaningfulness of the show.

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David Rhodes in Browngrass

Ace veteran local musician crafts his debut solo album

0 Comments · Tuesday, October 19, 2010
There was a time when David Rhodes Brown was one of the hottest guitarists in town. He began as a teenager, playing in a string of garage bands ("I was singing 'I Can't Get No Satisfaction' before I even knew what it was," he says), which led to a succession of Alternative Rock/Punk outfits, including the Warsaw Falcons. Amazingly, he's just now releasing his first solo album, 'Browngrass & Wildflowers,' which he says was inspired by public radio station WNKU's 25th anniversary.