WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Curmudgeon Notes 10.2.2013

Media musings from Cincinnati and beyond

0 Comments · Friday, October 4, 2013
I was covering federal courts and agencies for the Enquirer 17 years ago during the previous lockout. One impression remains unshakable: most federal employees told to stay home were offended by the “non-essential” designation. They didn’t think of themselves as bureaucrats, but more as civil service; apolitical and doing the best job they could with the resources provided by Congress.   

Worst Week Ever!: Sept. 25-Oct. 1

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 2, 2013
Local News Stations Restructure After Broadcasts Mistaken for Parodies of News Coverage: There are things you can almost guarantee will be on the local TV news if for some reason you find yourself stuck watching it. They are: things on fire, poor people committing crimes and things about people in the community doing something nice :)  

Back with Black

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 2, 2013
Back in 2006, Lewis Black told CityBeat in an interview that the Bush administration and the GOP were “fucking out of their minds.” So it is fortuitous that a recent interview took place on the second day of Texas Sen. Ted Cruz’s filibuster to protest the Affordable Care Act.   

A Lesson in the Lessers

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 7, 2013
 If only politicians were cicadas. At least we’d have a longer cycle of silence before the commencement of incessant droning and that annoying buzzing about. The only difference is cicadas, while butt-ugly, die after they mate.  
by German Lopez 08.01.2013
Posted In: News, 2013 Election, Mayor at 11:25 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
john cranley

Cranley Outraises Qualls in Mayoral Race

History suggests fundraising is not necessarily an indicator of strength

Ex-Councilman John Cranley is outraising Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls in the 2013 mayoral race by roughly $124,000. Some are calling the fundraising lead an important indicator of strength, but the history and research of money in politics show the lead might not matter much, if at all. The numbers came in yesterday as political candidates from around the state filed their finance reports. So far, Cranley has raised about $472,000, compared to Qualls’ $348,000. Of that money, Cranley has about $264,000 still in hand, and Qualls has nearly $193,000. The disparity is unsurprising to the campaigns. The Cranley campaign has always said it needs $1 million to win. Qualls, who’s been polled as the slight favorite, has a tamer goal of $750,000. The City Council races are similarly sprawled with cash. Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld is leading the pack with nearly $279,000, while newcomer Greg Landsman topped challengers and even some council members with a total raised of $165,000. Given all the cash pouring into the campaigns, many people assume it plays a pivotal role. But a look at the history and research shows fundraising might not matter all that much. Money clearly didn’t matter in the 2005 mayoral race. During that campaign, former State Sen. Mark Mallory spent nearly $380,000. Ex-Councilman David Pepper spent $1.2 million — more than three times his opponent. Mallory still won the vote 52-48 percent. In contrast, money might have boosted Sittenfeld to second place in the 2011 Council races, putting the relatively new challenger only behind the widely known Qualls. Sittenfeld raised $306,000 for that campaign, the most out of anyone in the race. Still, most political science points to money having a marginal, if any, electoral impact. Jennifer Victor, a political science professor at George Mason University, explains the research in her blog: “Campaigning may help voters focus their attention (see this), be persuasive in some cases (see this), and help deliver successful message (see this). Frequently, macro-economic trends are the best predictors of presidential elections. History tells us that all that money spent by outsiders may not affect the outcome of the election — because campaigns (generally) don’t matter (see political science research here, here, and here, for example).” Instead, political scientists cite other factors as much more important indicators: economic growth, the direction of the city, state and country, incumbency or successorship, name likability and recognition, and political affiliation.The mayoral primary election is Sept. 10, followed by the final election on Nov. 5. The next finance reports are due Oct. 24.[Correction: This story originally said $134,000 when the correct number is $124,000.]
 
 
by Hannah McCartney 06.24.2013
Posted In: Culture, Life at 09:24 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cb_answersissue 1_4s

Last Chance for The Answers Issue

We start answering tomorrow!

You have one more chance to submit us a question for CityBeat's first-ever Answers Issue — after today, we're closing the polls, sorting through all the questions and divvying them up amongst our reporting team. We'll spend the next few weeks hunting down the answers to your questions as best we can and bringing back all the info in a special themed issue sometime in July. Ask us questions about life in the Queen City you want answered — that means anything on city politics, arts and culture, food, sports, neighborhoods, E. coli in the Ohio River, bird law, Cincinnati's lizard history, what an inmate eats for breakfast at the Hamilton County Justice Center, etc. Whatever's on your mind. Go here to submit us the best questions you've got.
 
 
by German Lopez 06.14.2013
Posted In: News, City Council at 12:49 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
smitherman

Smitherman Temporarily Stepping Down from NAACP

Council member could permanently resign if he wins re-election

Council member Chris Smitherman announced in a statement today that he will leave his post as president of the Cincinnati chapter of the NAACP while he runs for re-election to City Council.If he does win re-election, Smitherman will offer his permanent resignation to the local chapter's executive committee, which can then accept or reject Smitherman's leave.James Clingman, a vice president of the NAACP and founder of the Greater Cincinnati African-American Chamber of Commerce, will take Smitherman's spot for now.Smitherman, City Council's sole Independent, has come under criticism recently to step down from his NAACP post as he runs for office. Others have also criticized Smitherman's involvement with political organizations like the conservative Coalition Opposed to Additional Spending and Taxes (COAST) and his support for Republican City Council candidates — involvement and support that critics argue are too political for the NAACP.A memo titled "Election Year Dos and Don'ts" from the NAACP tells members to avoid partisan, political activity."Although NAACP units are 501(c)(4) tax-exempt organizations, the national NAACP is a 501(c)(3) organization which is restricted in how it can assist people in registering or getting out to vote. In addition, NAACP policy specifically prohibits units’ engagement in political campaign activity. This means that NAACP units cannot endorse or oppose candidates running for public office, make financial or in-kind contributions to candidates, political parties, or PACs, or engage in other activity that is designed or targeted to influence the outcome of any candidate election," the memo reads.By separating himself from the NAACP, Smitherman can continue his political activities without violating federal and national NAACP rules.
 
 
by Hannah McCartney 06.13.2013
Posted In: Life, Culture at 10:24 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cb_answersissue 1_4s

The Answers Issue Needs You!

Soliciting lots more questions on everything and anything about life in Cincinnati

Hopefully, you've heard about CityBeat's first Answers Issue by now, and hopefully, by now you've submitted plentiful golden, glowing and totally insightful questions you want us to answer. If you haven't, however, there's still time to rack your brain for the most stump-worthy questions about life in Cincinnati so we, CityBeat's faithful editorial staff, can do some sleuthing, drink some Red Bull, make some calls, read some files, spend a few hours on Google, hit up the library, talk to some fortune-tellers — whatever we can to get your questions answered. Ask us questions about life in the Queen City you want answered — that means anything on city politics, arts and culture, food, sports, neighborhoods, E. coli in the Ohio River, bird law, what an inmate eats for breakfast at the Hamilton County Justice Center, etc. Whatever's on your mind. You submit your question (check out the Answers Issue page here), and our dutiful reporting team will pick the ones we like best, divide them up and bring you back the answers in an issue sourced directly from you guys. Your questions will be anonymous when we print them. We could use a lot more questions, you inquiring minds. Here's the question submissions form.
 
 

The Implied Menace of the ‘Jewish Lobby’

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 20, 2013
So what is it about Jews? Not only real Jews but also fearful fantasies about Jews. I ask because so many mainstream reporters, bloggers and columnists seem fascinated and repelled by the implied menace of “the Jewish lobby.”   

Two-Sided Story Syndrome

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 13, 2013
Here’s an unfortunate fact for journalism teachers and angry website commenters all around the world: Reality sometimes has a bias.    

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