WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Some People Call Him Maurice

Singer/songwriter Maurice Mattei details the pompatus of loss on Celebrity Issue

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 15, 2014
After 21 albums and countless gigs, Mattei remains fresh and engaged in the process.   

Four Runs, No Hits, No Errors

Cory Branan turns his diverse musical taste into the schizophonic Americana bash of The No-Hit Wonder

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 15, 2014
Cory Branan has a way with words but there’s one that sticks in his throat: compromise.   

Local Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett Harnesses Deep Human Magic

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 24, 2014
As a film critic, every time I settle into a theater seat I prepare myself for an experience that I liken to tapping into memory. The images that unspool before me may not be lived and processed  

Caged Heat

Born Cages successfully integrate Rock and Electronica in a band short on history and long on ambition

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 17, 2014
The question that’s on a lot of minds — particularly that of Born Cages guitarist/vocalist/songwriter Vlad Holiday — is, “Why can’t Rock and Electronica co-exist in a single entity?”   

Frontier Folk Nebraska, Pop Empire Make MOTR Release Party Central

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 10, 2014
Two great Cincinnati-based bands take over Over-the-Rhine’s MOTR Pub (motrpub.com) this weekend to celebrate their excellent new releases with free shows.  

Get Weller Soon

Paul Weller’s lifetime of musical creativity is (partially) encapsulated in his second solo hits collection

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 10, 2014
Paul Weller’s career, in total, has generated an astonishing 32 hits collections (including B-sides/rarities compilations) and six box sets.  
by Charlie Harmon 09.10.2014 98 days ago
Posted In: Music History at 01:23 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
bogarts_steveziegelmeyer2

These Walls Have Heard It All: Bogart's

Bogart’s, the never-so-clean music venue that sits along the construction-ridden stretch of pavement known as Short Vine, goes back far beyond any concert you may have seen there in the past several decades. It holds a rich history dating back more than a century, although this isn’t so easily apparent now.Live Nation, a national live-events company that promotes acts and operates a large list of venues around the country, took over Bogart’s in 1999 in a deal with Nederlander Entertainment, who was operating the venue at the time.One of the myriad changes they have made over the years has been a revamp of the old website, molding it to the standard format they use for all their venues, which in a way deemphasizes the historical significance of the place. I’d think the wrinkled timeline of the building might be a point of interest, but I suppose concert-goers are more concerned with getting tickets to collectively bob heads in a loud room than the age-old energy of that very room.Here’s what you may not know about Bogart’s. Bogart’s hasn’t always been Bogart’s. Built in 1890, it was originally called the Nordland Plaza Nickelodeon and, fitting with popular entertainment of the period, it was a vaudeville theater.Imagine this: lights illuminate figures flying through the air, turning and twisting as they clutch their trapeze over the small stage. They complete a routine and the room is filled with a crowd-hushing roar, followed by the entrance of a ringmaster rearing a lion up to full height right in front of your eyes. He leads it in circles, keeping it calm and cool, before leading it back offstage to allow a magician to come out, accompanied side-stage by two comedic cross-gender impersonators, hooting and howling as the illusionist pulls a hair out of his hat or cuts a man in half. The show ends with a small orchestra playinga classical piece to guide three dancers across the platform.This was “vaudeville,” fringe American entertainment named after the creation of Sargent’s Great Vaudeville Company in Louisville. It’s fascinating to wonder what wild things we could have seen at the Nordland Plaza in the early 20th century.As technology developed, folks apparently grew less accustomed to leaving their houses for public, live entertainment, and TV took over the world of entertaining. The theater succumbed to the competition from the television industry and transformed into a German film theater in the mid-1950s under the same name.Some time later it reverted back to live entertainment, becoming a restaurant theater with the new name Inner Circle. This nightclub was far from the talk of the town, slowly spiraling into failure until a man named Al Porkolab and two partners bought the building.They named it Bogart’s, which was short for Bogart’s Café Americain, a reference to the movie Casablanca, apparently one of Pokolab’s favorites. In its earliest days it followed the movie as a theme, decorating with tropical trees and offering food with the ambiance of tuxedoed servers and a lounge band. The venue only sat a few hundred people at this point, and the restaurant-club followed Inner Circle down a fissure to failure in just months.At this point Porkolab took over, buying out his partners and extensively remodeling the building, turning it into a nightclub that featured local, national and international music acts. It opened as such in 1982.It remained open in this state, still housing only several hundred people, for a decade. During that time it garnered a little heat, specifically from Cincinnati Mayor Charles Luken in 1985, who wanted the place shut down due to the neighborhood havoc that would ensue after the late-night dance parties the club would host from 2-6 a.m. on Sundays.The building underwent another round of renovations in 1993 that turned the few hundred seats into 1,500, the current capacity of the venue. With the larger volume, the venue began bringing in acts that were too big for a small bar or club but wouldn’t get booked by a big-time venue.Many bands you know now that would sell out a huge venue played Bogart’s in their proving days. To name a few, acts such as Red Hot Chili Peppers, Phish, Slayer and Pearl Jam (who, as a matter of fact, is coming in October to play US Bank Arena) impressed crowds on that intimate stage.In ’97, Nederlander took over operations, leading us back to the highly reputed ownership by Live Nation, who according to their short paragraph of history on the site, “continues the tradition of quality live entertainment that has been [the venue's] forte since the building was built.”Check out the upcoming shows at this old vaudeville hall: Sept. 11: Taking Back SundaySept. 12: Paul WellerSept. 16: August Alsina: Testimony LiveSept. 19: Nick Carter and Jordan KnightSept. 20: Blacklight College PartySept. 26: MatisyahuGo here for Bogart's photos throughout the years.
 
 

Ellis Paul with Rebecca Loebe

Thursday • 20th Century Theater

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 3, 2014
Ellis Paul is a musician who has hung in there over the years despite the ups and downs of the music business.   

Bone Structure

New Orleans' Trombone Shorty discusses his musical inspirations

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 3, 2014
Trombone Shorty's latest album, Say That to Say This, has made history by bringing together the original members of the seminal New Orleans band The Meters for the first time in more than three decades.  

Legendary Shack Shakers with Whiskey 
Shivers and Whiskey Bent Valley Boys

Friday • Southgate House Revival

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 3, 2014
Legendary Shack Shakers has been described as everything from Southern Gothic Rock and Rockabilly/Cowpunk to Sideshow Carnival Music and a group that “don’t do murder ballads, they do murder boogie.”     

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