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Total Immersion

Acclaimed novelist Rachel Kushner discusses her approach to writing

1 Comment · Wednesday, January 29, 2014
Rachel Kushner’s The Flamethrowers is rightly being hailed as one the of the best novels in recent memory, a deeply immersive book marked by incisive cultural observations and a vividly descriptive prose style that is drawing comparisons to everyone from Flaubert to Don DeLillo.  

The Nationalist

Chris Matthews' latest book looks back at his days as a political insider

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 4, 2013
Chris Matthews is a political junkie of unyielding enthusiasm. His nightly talk show, Hardball, has been an MSNBC staple for more than a decade, a showcase for its irascible host’s boundless passion for politics and the importance of good governance in the lives of everyday Americans.  

The Pages Of History

Looking back at 160 years of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County

1 Comment · Wednesday, October 16, 2013
If you wanted to borrow a book from a library in 18th-century America, you might run into some problems. Back then public libraries didn’t exist. Instead, small private libraries served those who were members — mainly upper-class citizens who could afford the annual fees.  

Photographer Michael E. Keating drops 'Cincinnati: Shadow & Light'

1 Comment · Wednesday, October 9, 2013
Michael E. Keating spent 34 years as a photojournalist at The Cincinnati Enquirer, where his vivid work gave readers views of the Queen City that could be beautiful, troubling or revealing — sometimes all at once and almost always imbued with an uncommon sense of humanity.  

The Bookseller

Neil Van Uum is back with a new store at Fountain Square

1 Comment · Wednesday, October 2, 2013
With the rise of Amazon, Netflix, iTunes and myriad other Internet-driven options, old-school brick-and-mortar book, video and music stores are evaporating at a rapid pace. It’s a distressing development for many of us who grew up wandering the aisles of such places, and that isn’t just nostalgia talking.  

The Maid's Version

Daniel Woodrell (Little, Brown and Company)

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 4, 2013
Daniel Woodrell is clearly among the best living American writers when it comes to evoking the sights, sounds and even the smell of the blood-soaked terrain on which most of his novels take place. Described by some as the master of “country noir,” Woodrell is incredibly gifted at describing small towns of the Missouri Ozarks while also delivering pitch-perfect dialogue straight out of those hills.  

Night Film

by Marisha Pessl (Random House)

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 4, 2013
Written with hip, smart and exquisitely brilliant prose, Marisha Pessl’s latest novel, Night Film, is like a roller coaster ride through the haunted house at the wildest amusement park ever built. It’s a spine-tingling journey covering enormous territory as it delves into the deep recesses of the human psyche.  

Fiona Maazel's Latest Novel Follows a Cult in Cincinnati

1 Comment · Wednesday, August 28, 2013
Compelling, contemplative and laugh-out-loud funny, Fiona Maazel’s latest novel, Woke Up Lonely, is a sprawling story of a wildly popular cult, the Helix, which promises a cure for loneliness.  

Fair And Balanced (And Leaked)

How a Cincinnati native went from 'O'Reilly Factor' producer to Gawker's "Fox Mole"

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 21, 2013
By April 2012, Joe Muto could no longer stand working at Fox News. As a producer of The O’Reilly Factor, and in several previous positions with Fox, Muto had hidden his liberal views while telling himself he wasn’t really contributing to the channel’s conservative bias.  

Maps, Magazines, Money

Handsome book explores printing trade in 19th-century Cincinnati

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 24, 2013
The Engraving Trade in Early Cincinnati: With a Brief Account of the Beginning of the Lithograph Trade is a beautiful book, as it should be, given its subject matter. In the early years of the 19th century, images in publications were the way people saw the world beyond their own experience.  

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