What should I be doing instead of this?
 
WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

The Long Fight

New coalition looks for long-term plans to reduce violent crime in the city

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 16, 2015
Cincinnati has fought a pitched battle over the past year to address gun violence in neighborhoods around the city.  

Marker to Commemorate Who Concert Tragedy

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 2, 2015
It’s been a long time coming, but Cincinnati is set to mark this week’s 36th anniversary of the 1979 Who concert tragedy with the dedication of a permanent memorial marker by the site.   

Worst Week Ever! Nov. 25-Dec. 1

0 Comments · Tuesday, November 24, 2015
Cranley emails self-righteous press statement and wishes someone had paused it; meanwhile at the NRA; women earning closer to equal pay, but that's only kind of good; weed investors regret Buddie mascot; research chimps to receive gold watches for catching hell all those years.  

Cranley Asks Feds Not to Send Syrian Refugees to Cincinnati

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 18, 2015
Following attacks in Egypt, Beirut and Paris that killed hundreds, the United States should place a moratorium on Syrian refugees, Mayor John Cranley said in a Nov. 16 statement.   

Worst Week Ever! Nov. 18-24

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 18, 2015
Renewed interest in what others think fuels Cranley concert-promotion efforts; terrorist attacks in Paris prompt Rob Lowe to share immigration policy tips; uniforms make Bills and Jets look the same to colorblind fans; OSU sues Horseshoe Casino over attempts to copyright generic name  

Confused By ‘Enquirer’ Parks Levy Endorsement

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 11, 2015
The election’s done, but I’m still puzzling over the Enquirer endorsement of the parks levy. From what the two endorsement editorials said about the park board, its president Otto Budig and Mayor John Cranley, I expected Enquirer opposition to the levy.  
by Natalie Krebs 11.11.2015
Posted In: News at 11:29 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
voting

Morning News and Stuff

Cincy tries to figure out just what happened on Election Day; SORTA looks at extending streetcars hours; Kasich interrupts his way through fourth GOP debate

Good morning! Here is your daily roundup of streetcar issues and past and future elections. Democrats and Republicans gathered in front of the board of elections yesterday scratching their heads and trying to figure out just what went wrong on Election Day when a series of glitches forced Hamilton County polling places to stay open two additional hours. Most of the blame was placed on the new electronic sign in system, which was programmed with the wrong cut-off date for voter registration, excluding as many as 11,000 people. The system's manufacturer Tenex Software Solutions, which created the system for $1.2 million and set the cutoff date as July 6 and not October 5, issued a public apology yesterday. But lucky for them, as voter turnout is generally low across the United States, official estimates put the number of excluded people around 4,000. Other culprits for the Election Day disaster include poor Internet connections, older poll workers unfamiliar with the new technology and problems with the machines reading old, worn down driver's licenses' barcodes.   Is your dream to ride the streetcar in a drunken haze Friday night post-OTR bar hopping and binge drinking? Well, Mayor John Cranley and SORTA are working to make that dream a reality! SORTA is thinking of extending the streetcars' hours before it's even made its debut to the public. Currently, the streetcar is scheduled to operate 6 a.m. to midnight Fridays and Saturdays and 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. every other day of the week. Two plans have been launched that would generally start service a little later in the morning, around 7 a.m., and keep it running until midnight on weekdays and 2 a.m. on weekends, which conveniently coordinates with closing time for the bars. Mayor Cranley says he supports the streetcar operating later to support the growing nightlife in Over-the-Rhine and downtown. SORTA will submit the revised schedule to its board and City Council at the beginning of next year. The Neighborhood Stabilization Initiative by the Federal Housing Finance Agency has selected Cincinnati as one of 18 cities that will let local community organizations get first dibs before the general public on foreclosed properties owned by Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae. The project, which hopes to help cities that were hit the hardest by the housing crisis, selected cities that have at least 100 properties valued at less than $75,000. Cincinnati easily hit this mark with between 301 and 700 properties falling into this category. The program will launch Dec. 1 and also be extended to other troubled Ohio cities like Akron, Dayton, Columbus and Toledo. Gov. John Kasich might still be lagging behind in polls, but at least he's determined to be heard. In the fourth GOP presidential debate last night, Kasich got the second most air time, but obtained most of it by interrupting fellow nominees and moderators. In the process, he managed to get Donald Trump booed then himself booed when he said he would bail out the big banks and launched into an exchange with real estate tycoon Trump over immigration and fracking. The Columbus Dispatch reported that while Kasich's new aggressive tactics and moderate positions may be good in the general election, it might not fare so well for him in the primaries, where he is already the underdog and is easily overshadowed by the more extreme Trump and retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson. Football, America's favorite sport, causes head injuries and concussions. So we should all be signing up little Billy and Jane for soccer, right? Well, turns out soccer also causes head injuries when players heading the ball, which looks impressive, but may actually cause a lot of damage later on. So the United States Soccer Federation, which oversees U.S. soccer youth national teams, has unveiled a new set of regulation, one of which is prohibiting children 10 and under with their precious developing brains from heading the ball. The move comes to resolve a lawsuit was filed by players and parents in August 2014 against FIFA, U.S. Soccer and the American Youth Soccer Organization for failing to monitor all the head injuries.   Email me at nkrebs@citybeat.com. I'd love to hear your story tips!      
 
 

Immigration Task Force Announces Recommendations

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 4, 2015
Mayor John Cranley and the Task Force on Immigration he convened last year announced a series of recommendations on Oct. 28 aimed at making Cincinnati the most welcoming city in the country for immigrants.   

Political Spending, Park Board Bonuses Spur Further Debate on Parks Charter Amendment

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 28, 2015
Debate over Mayor John Cranley’s proposed permanent tax increase to fund park projects has gotten more contentious as revelations about questionable spending by the Cincinnati Park Board came to light last week.   

Debate Heats Up on Parks Charter Amendment

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 14, 2015
A proposal by Mayor John Cranley to amend Cincinnati’s charter in order to raise funds for the city’s parks has created a good deal of controversy ahead of the Nov. 3 election, where voters will decide whether or not to adopt it.   

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