WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Demanding More of ‘Words and Pictures’

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 11, 2014
Back in the early aughts, Clive Owen starred in a series of promotional online shorts created by BMW called The Hire, where he played a mysterious driver with no name enlisted by powerful people to tackle jobs that required a certain skill set, particularly behind the wheel, that only he had.  

Big Screen Summer Classics

Lexington’s historic Kentucky Theatre keeps classic movies alive

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 4, 2014
Larry Thomas, a longtime local film buff and lover of great old movie theaters, speaks for many Cincinnatians when he says, “I try at least once a week to consciously think to curse the names of all those who had a hand in murdering the Albee. What a waste!”   

Critical Lessons From an After-School Film Club

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 16, 2014
For the past eight-plus years, I have been facilitating an evolving after-school program that began quite innocently with me subbing in for my CityBeat colleague Kathy Y. Wilson.  

The Roots of Jack and Those Beans

0 Comments · Tuesday, February 26, 2013
That tagline — “You don’t know Jack” — is going to be run into the ground over the course of the next week or so, as director Bryan Singer’s latest feature about a farmhand named Jack, some magic beans and an army of angry giants threatens to overtake the multiplexes.  

Coming to a (Movie) Theater Near You

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 18, 2014
I love going to the movies, but I leave writing about them to others, especially my CityBeat colleague tt stern-enzi, who routinely offers a perspective worth reading. Nevertheless, I’m going to local cineplexes more often for digital transmissions of theater from around the world.  

Reflecting Life

Nick Clooney on film's reflection of the human condition and how Hollywood finally set the record straight about the brutality of slavery

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 19, 2014
As the March 2 date for this year’s Academy Awards approaches, and with it the growing suspense over who will win what, Nick Clooney follows from his Augusta, Ky., home with special interest.  

10 Hot and Cool Summer Movies

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 12, 2013
 Summer at the movies can play out like a coin toss. Heads means a furnace-blast of heat from the blockbusters that dominate the multiplexes. With tails, you get the sensual embrace of the cool, hidden treasures stashed away in the art houses. Here’s a sample of the potential blockbuster and indie winners.    

The Classic Is Dead, Long Live Gatsby

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 8, 2013
He is American, old-school American, cut from the cloth of the robber barons and cutthroat captains of industry, the gamblers and the sometimes killers who did more than beg, borrow and steal to get ahead and who weren’t losing any sleep over their actions — nobody’s sleepless in the great American past.   

The Accidental Framing of the Indie Cleveland Experience

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 10, 2013
 Positively Cleveland offered me the chance to experience the Indie Cleveland vibe (based around the opening weekend of the 37th annual Cleveland International Film Festival), so I signed on for the press tour, but I was skeptical. Would it cramp my style, force me into a box of pre-packaged highlights with little of my own vaunted trial and error?    
by tt stern-enzi 04.05.2013
at 09:42 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Roger Ebert Will Live on When the Lights Dim

What can I say about a man I never met, but who had been part of my life for decades? I, seemingly like a whole generation of film fans, watched Siskel and Ebert back in the 1980s, and then graduated to reading his reviews in the Chicago Sun-Times during my college years. Every Friday morning, I made my sojourn to the Annenberg School of Communications  library and collected the Sun-Times, the Philadelphia Inquirer, the Village Voice, and Variety so that I could prepare for the weekend’s new releases. I didn’t always go to the movies, but I wanted to know what the critics thought, which meant I wanted to know, first and foremost, what Ebert thought. I didn’t always agree with him – many times, in fact, I was flummoxed by his wrongheadedness – but reading his take was a necessary and very personal prequel to the filmgoing experience.I’ve been a working critic now for almost 13 years, and for the last seven I’ve also taught film review and feature writing classes at the University of Cincinnati. I never imagined I would be working in the same field as Ebert, even while I was taking undergraduate level class that examined film as text. I simply loved movies. Always have and always will. I know that last part will be the case thanks to Ebert. His love of the movies evolved as the form and critical analysis experienced their own growing pains. He made us all critics, by opening up an exchange that now, thanks to the Internet, has a global forum. What has been most inspiring about his work and approach over the last decade is his willingness to embrace technology as a means of broadcasting that very singular voice of his, overflowing with knowledge, but also immediately accessible. His sense of the need for accessibility is the greatest and most lasting impact he will have on criticism. It is what can and should continue to guide the would-be critics to come – the next generation of bloggers, tweeters, and those adherents to whatever is to come.More established critics and writers have stories about meeting Ebert, spending time in his presence, what have you. My remembrance of the man is different. I’m one of those Johnny-come-lately types who “knew” him from afar. I’ve attended the Toronto International Film Festival for the last four or five years, and I recall, my first Ebert-sighting, about three year back. He and his wife were ahead of me on the escalator at the downtown multiplex space that serves as the main screening hub. They were engaged with others, talking very likely about the upcoming screening or maybe he was thinking about the Twitter event he was scheduled to host. Whatever was the case, there he was, despite all those years of globetrotting and a dizzying collection of screenings, still so full of life and joy for the festival experience. I didn’t need to speak with him or even be near him. Just to know he was there, doing his thing, seeing movies, helping us to engage with them by any means necessary, was more than enough. I looked for him each year after that and was always glad when I spotted him. I’ll likely do the same thing this year and I won’t be surprised if my mind plays a little trick on me and I convince myself that I’ve seen him again, roaming about Toronto somewhere.He’ll be there, somewhere in the dark, like always.This story was originally published on tt stern-enzi's blog, here.
 
 

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