WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Rick Pender 09.21.2012
Posted In: Theater at 11:03 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
onstage 9-19 - mockingbird @ cincy shakes - bruce cromer as atticus finch - photo rich sofranko

Stage Door: Great Start to Fall

The fall theater season in Cincinnati is off to a great start, with well received productions on several stages. If you get a chance to see Cincinnati Shakespeare Company's production of To Kill a Mockingbird, I urge you to do so. It's onstage through Sept. 30, but almost all of its performances (including several added ones) have been sold out. Good news for the theater, but not for you if you don't have tickets yet. Nevertheless, it would be worth a call to CSC's box office (513-381-2273 x1) to see if there's anything available. The chance to see Bruce Cromer portray the virtuous attorney Atticus Finch is worth the effort. If you can't score a ticket at CSC, you might try to get in to see Good People, a new play by Pulitzer Prize winner David Lindsay-Abaire, which concludes its run on Sunday. The tale about an unskilled woman from South Boston seeking work in today's world has the ring of truth and reality to it, and Annie Fitzpatrick's portrait of hard-luck Margie — who thinks of herself as "good people" — is touching and relevant to the world we live in. Tickets are selling at a fast clip for this one, too, so call to find out if seats are available: 513-421-3555. Want to take some kids to a show they'll enjoy? It's always fun to introduce them to live theater, and there are two great choices currently onstage: The Cincinnati Playhouse production of The Three Musketeers (running through Sept. 29, 513-421-3888) is full of action and adventure, good guys and bad guys. And The Music Man, on the Showboat Majestic (through Sept. 30, 513-241-6550), is a classic musical with a lot of humor — and a winning acting job by charming Owen Gunderman as Winthrop, the  kid who overcomes his shyness when he gets a cornet to play in a boys' band. Want something a tad more adventurous: Check out the Fringe shows that Know Theatre has brought back from last June's festival for several days. It's a sampling of some of the best work that drew big crowds to the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood, including two "Pick of the Fringe" offerings, On Her Pillow and The Screw You Revue, and two solo performers, Tommy Nugent and Kevin Thornton, who always draw a crowd. Probably no problem with ticket availability, but I recommend calling in advance: 513-300-5669.
 
 
by Rick Pender 09.14.2012
Posted In: Theater at 08:19 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
onstage 9-19 - mockingbird @ cincy shakes - bruce cromer as atticus finch - photo rich sofranko

Stage Door: 'To Kill a Mockingbird' and 'Good People'

No matter what your theatrical tastes are, there's something onstage right now for you to enjoy this weekend: A classic story: If you can get a ticket (there aren't many left, I'm told, except perhaps for Saturday matinees at 2 p.m.) to To Kill a Mockingbird, you won't be disappointed. It's a wonderful theatrical retelling of Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize winning novel. It features one of Greater Cincinnati's best actors as the honorable attorney Atticus Finch. Tickets: 513-381-2273, x1. Adventure: Buckle on your swashes (and your sword) and head to the Cincinnati Playhouse for The Three Musketeers. It's a familiar tale of a young man named D'Artagnan who yearns to be a member of the King's guards. He's brash and naive, but his role models, "the three musketeers," are funny and loving and always ready for a good fight. This is one that kids can enjoy. Tickets: 513-421-3888 Contemporary drama with a dose of with: Ensemble Theatre's Good People is the story of a woman who loses her job and struggles to figure out what to do next. She has good, gossipy support from two friends — and a one-time boyfriend who's now a successful doctor. Her story is one that feels like it's about someone you know, trying to make ends meet in today's world. Tickets: 513-421-3555. An old-fashioned musical: Meredith Willson's The Music Man, a Tony Award winner, is getting a charming production on the Showboat Majestic. It's a big cast on a small stage, but it's inventively directed and choreographed by Ed Cohen, Dee Anne Bryll and Jane Green, and you'll definitely leave the theater marching in 4/4 time to "Seventy-Six Trombones" or humming one of the show's other memorable melodies. Tickets: 513-241-6550
 
 
by Rick Pender 09.07.2012
Posted In: Theater at 11:25 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
good people @ etc - annie fitzpatrick, kate wilford & deb g. girdler - photo ryan kurtz

Stage Door: 'Good People' and 'The Three Musketeers'

After a long hot summer (well, it's still feeling like a long hot summer), we have a full array of shows onstage in Cincinnati for you to choose among. I've seen two of them so far: Good People at Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati and The Three Musketeers at the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park. ETC's production of Pulitzer Prize winner David Lindsay-Abaire's 2011 piece (this is the regional premiere of Good People, which was nominated for a Tony a year ago) about a woman who falls off the bottom of the employment ladder has enough humor to be entertaining (especially with Annie Fitzpatrick in the central role of Margie and Kate Wilford and Deb Girdler as her gossipy friends and bingo-night comrades) and enough contemporary relevance to be thought-provoking. ETC's D. Lynn Meyers is at her best staging naturalistic shows with social meaning, and that's exactly what this one offers. It has a great cast and flexible, attractive scenic design by the ever-creative Brian c. Mehring. I gave it a Critic's Pick. Through Sept. 23. Review here. Box office: 513-421-3555. I wanted to love The Three Musketeers at the Playhouse (through Sept. 29), but its balance of humor and heart is out of whack to my tastes. There's lots of adventure, hilarity and laughter — especially some no-holds-barred swordplay — but the show tries to hard to entertain that it misses out on the true emotion that should lie beneath. I suspect many people will love this thrill-a-minute tale of political intrigue and valor, loyalty and royalty in 17th-century France, and perhaps it will evolve to deeper feelings as it runs. I love new Artistic Director Blake Robison's desire to put appealing, family-friendly work onstage, and he's using this production to show what he means. I hope his approach gets a tad more texture and depth as his tenure continues. Review here. Box office: 513-421-3888. I haven't yet seen To Kill a Mockingbird at Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, and their publicity says it's already sold out its first-two weekends. So you might want to put that one on your calendar for sometime before it wraps up (Sept. 30). In the meantime, you might want to head to Washington Park on Sunday evening at 7 p.m. for a special free presentation of CSC's touring production of The Tempest. It's a perfect piece for outdoor performance, set on an island with a sorcerer and his lovely daughter and some shipwrecked nobles who are responsible for his exile. Audience participation will be a key component of this event, with the audience asked to create large-scale effects by blowing bubbles, making waves with silk and generating sound effects. Sounds like great fun. Music (by The Young Heirlooms) begins at 6 p.m. This is a good one to bring kids to see. Also off and running this weekend is Cincinnati Landmark's production of Tennessee Williams' Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. It's a classic drama of sexual tension and family strife, a bit heavier fare than is usually found at the Covedale Center. It's a sign of the company's ambition to be a full-fledged theater offering a wide range of material. (Through Sept. 30.) Box office: 513-241-6550.
 
 

Theater Season Heats Up

0 Comments · Tuesday, August 28, 2012
As the final weeks of summer cool down, it’s time for Cincinnati’s theaters to turn up the heat.   

Thunder Knocking on the Door (Review)

Jocular script staged with musicality, theatricality

0 Comments · Friday, April 27, 2012
First staged in 1999, Thunder is the Mt. Adams theater’s best selling musical during producing artistic director Ed Stern’s tenure. It’s the final mainstage production of his 20th and final season. The show tells a mythical tale of dueling Blues guitarists; it’s stuffed with emotionally conceived songs by renowned singer and composer Keb’ Mo’ working with Anderson Edwards.  

Read My Scripts

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 17, 2011
While you might think of a play or a musical as entertainment — which it is — there’s another dimension worth considering. They are also works of literature, words written on a page meant to be spoken or perhaps sung. The success or failure of a performed work often hinges on the quality of the words in a play’s script or a musical’s book.  

Get Some Direction

0 Comments · Tuesday, January 4, 2011
Actors often say the most invigorating part of any production is rehearsing, in “the room” where a director imposes a vision and steers performers and designers toward the final product. For this reason, you should pay heed to who’s directing shows you choose to see.  

Second City Does Cincinnati: Pride and Porkopolis (Review)

Cincinnati gets teased and satirized by entertaining Playhouse show

1 Comment · Saturday, November 13, 2010
If it's laughter you're seeking for the holidays, you'll find plenty at the Cincinnati Playhouse in the new comedy revue from the legendary Chicago-based Second City improv company. It's full of our familiar foibles as well as a cast of local crackpots and characters. Never has it been so much fun to be teased.   

The Gift of Theater

0 Comments · Tuesday, December 21, 2010
With just a few days left for Christmas shopping, I'm making a few theater-related suggestions: a Broadway snowglobe, new musical theater recordings, 'Sondheim: The Birthday Concert' on DVD and gift certificates to our wonderful local theater companies.   

God Bless Our Holiday Shows, Every One!

0 Comments · Monday, December 6, 2010
I annually face the holidays with mixed emotions. I love the holiday season, but I also know that it means I'll be in overdrive, attending numerous theatrical holiday productions. But there are excellent options again this holiday season, starting with Cincinnati Playhouse's 'A Christmas Carol' and ETC's 'Cinderella.'  

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