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Venus in Fur (Review)

Playhouse production provides revenge — Goddess-style

0 Comments · Sunday, April 27, 2014
David Ives' 2010 play combines revenge with a lot of prickly dialogue — contemporary, crude, literate and historic — and some flat-out funny moments.  
by Rick Pender 04.25.2014
Posted In: Theater at 08:12 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door 4-25 - venus in fur @ cincinnati playhouse - greta wohlrabe & pj sosko - photo sandy underwood

Stage Door: Options Abound

There's ample evidence at the Cincinnati Playhouse as to why David Ives' Tony-nominated play Venus in Fur is the most produced script in America this season. I saw the opening performance last evening, and it's an entertaining attention-grabber. Inspired by an erotic Victorian novel, it's the story of a playwright who's adapted it for the stage but despairing of finding the right actress — until Vanda appears. Despite the initial impression she makes, she proves to be almost too good to be true. Greta Wohlrabe is a marvel in this role, flipping between being an ambitious, over-enthused wannabe and a commanding, demanding, sophisticated paramour who knows the character she wants to play and how to get what she wants. It's sexy and funny — and a great evening for grown-ups. Through May 17. Tickets ($30-$75): 513-421-3888. Want to try something new this weekend? A new theater company, Women in Theatre (WIT) is staging Joe Calarco's Walter Cronkite Is Dead at St. John United Church of Christ in Bellevue, Ky. Two women stuck in an airport together end up sharing a table: One, from Washington, D.C., is reserved and educated, yearning for peace and quiet; the other is a chatty Southerner who can't stop talking. Their conversation, according to the show's publicity, is "funny, difficult, deeply revealing and astonishingly frank." Through May 3. Tickets: 859-441-6882. Stacy Sims, my CityBeat colleague, thought that New Edgecliff Theatre's production of Other People's Money was pretty good. (CityBeat review here.) Jerry Sterner's 1989 play remains timely, the story of a rapacious business guy who stands to destroy a small town when he buys a company that is pretty much the sole livelihood of the residents of a small Rhode Island town. Stacy called the show "good entertainment" and added, "it just might provoke you to consider whom you are listening to today." It's onstage at the Aronoff's Fifth Third Bank Theater through Saturday evening.  Stacy liked Know Theatre's production of The Twentieth-Century Way enough to give it a Critic's Pick in her CityBeat review here. It's two actors playing two actors in 1914 who are hired to play gay men in Long Beach and entrap "social vagrants" — that is, gay men. It's a multi-leveled script, playing with concepts of what's real and what's "enacted." Heady but fascinating, and it features two excellent actors, Jens Rasmussen and Michael McKeough. You won't be bored if you go to see this one. Through May 3. Tickets ($15 in advance; $20 at the door): 513-300-5669. Two productions that will appeal to audiences who like old-fashioned theater remain onstage. With its final performance on Sunday, Mary Chase's gentle comedy, Harvey, at the Carnegie in Covington, is about Elwood, a guy who's a little off-kilter — who sees a six-foot-tall white rabbit that no one else believes is real (except the audience). Tickets ($17-$24); 859-957-1940. The classic musical Gypsy — full of great show tunes — continues at the Covedale through May 4; it's about Rose, the pushy stage mother who launched her rather unwilling daughter into a burlesque career as Gypsy Rose Lee. (CityBeat review here.) Tickets ($21-$24): 513-241-6550.
 
 
by Rick Pender 04.18.2014
Posted In: Theater at 11:24 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Stage Door: Weekend Theater Picks

There are several good theater choices south of the Ohio River this weekend.The theater (and dance) program at Northern Kentucky University presents a truly varied array of programming — this season has included a play by Orson Welles, the legendary musical South Pacific, Shakespeare's As You Like It and more. The academic year's final production Monty Python's Spamalot, opened last evening, and it seems to be a perfect vehicle for a lot of onstage clowning. (In case you haven't been tuned in, the show is subtitled "A musical lovingly ripped off from the motion picture Monty Python and the Holy Grail," and many of the show's most hilarious moments are reproduced wholesale onstage.) But clowning can be serious work, and if you catch NKU's production, pay attention to the choreography (the work of NKU grad Roderick Justice) which is complex, amusing and very well executed by the cast of 25. Director Ken Jones keeps things moving; the actors get into the tomfoolery from start to finish, especially Kat Moser as the diva who's the Lady of the Lake and Bradley Goren as long-suffering Patsy (he's the one who clicks the coconut shells to simulate King Arthur riding on horseback, among other amusing moments). The show is a fine entertainment, if you're a fan of the low but articulate humor of the Python troupe. Through April 27. Tickets ($8-$14): 859-572-5464.Comedy of an entirely different sort is available at another Kentucky venue, the Carnegie in Covington, where Mary Chase's 1945 Pulitzer Prize winner Harvey is available through April 27. This is a piece of gentle humor from the past, about a slightly off-kilter guy who sees a six-foot-plus rabbit — he calls it a "pooka" — named Harvey, much to the dismay of several family members who are embarrassed by his behavior. Their efforts to get him committed to a local asylum go awry to much merriment and a message about being, well, gentle and sweet. This is good, old-fashioned fun. Tickets: 859-957-1940.If you prefer a well-written contemporary drama, this weekend is your last chance to see A Delicate Ship at the Cincinnati Playhouse. Anna Ziegler's new show (this is its world premiere) is a memory play that explores an unexpected chain of events triggered by a love triangle. It's beautifully staged by Michael Evan Haney with a cast of three actors who are just right for each of their roles. I gave this one a Critic's Pick when it opened; it's as good as anything I saw recently at the much-respected Humana Festival of New American Plays at Actors Theatre of Louisville. Tickets ($30-$80): 513-421-3888.
 
 
by Rick Pender 04.11.2014
Posted In: Theater at 08:17 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door

Stage Door: Green Day and More

If you follow music coverage in CityBeat (hey, isn't that really why you pick up the paper?), you're certainly aware of Green Day's 2004 recording American Idiot. But since you're reading my weekend theater previews, you must be interested in other kinds of performance, so here's a tip: For two nights only, Green Day's American Idiot, a stage version of the powerful Punk score, will be onstage at the Aronoff. That's right — Friday and Saturday only, just three performances, much shorter that Broadway in Cincinnati's two-week presentation of touring Broadway musicals. I can vouch for this one, since I saw it a year ago during a similar tour stop in Dayton. It's the story of three disaffected guys who take different downward spirals when confronted with the numbing boredom of everyday life — "alien nation" — as they sing in the opening number. The recording was conceived as a "Punk Rock Opera" and turned into a Tony Award-nominated Broadway show in 2010, with a lot of involvement by Green Day's lead singer Billie Joe Armstrong (who actually appeared onstage in New York at various performances; that's not happening here in Cincinnati). There's a day-of-performance lottery for a limited number of $25 tickets; you need to show up two-and-a-half hours before the performance you're hoping to see (8 p.m. Friday, and 5 and 8 p.m. on Saturday) with a valid photo ID. Complete an entry form and wait 30 minutes to find out if you're a winner. If you prefer to just go ahead and buy your seats ($38-$91), you can call the Aronoff box office: 513-621-2787. In the classic musical Gypsy, Rose has very concrete ideas regarding how to turn her daughters into stars (long before Green Day was punking out, to be sure): Back in the 1920s and ’30s she pushed her kids onto vaudeville stages whether they liked it or not. Things never went quite as she imagined, which was really a desire for her own fame and stardom. It's one of the great musicals, and the role of Rose has been compared to King Lear. That might be a bit of a stretch, but she's a tragic character who's fascinating to watch. There's a ton of great music, composed by Jule Styne with lyrics by a very young Stephen Sondheim and lots of humor along the way, especially the hilarious number by three strippers, "You Gotta Get a Gimmick." Cincinnati Landmark opened its production Thursday night, and it will be onstage at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts through May 4. Tickets ($21-$24): 513-241-6550. Mary Chase's comedy Harvey won the 1945 Pulitzer Prize and had a four-year Broadway run (1,800 performances). The story of Elwood P. Dowd and his invisible friend, a 6-foot tall rabbit named Harvey, is perhaps best known for the 1950 movie featuring Jimmy Stewart in an Oscar-nominated performance. That's all well and good, but it's a show that audiences love to see live and in-person, and you can do just that at Covington's Carnegie for the next three weekends (tonight through April 27). It's directed by Buz Davis, who produced shows at the Carnegie when it was a dilapidated wreck back in the ’80s and ’90s. Now he's returning to stage Harvey in the beautifully renovated Otto M. Budig Theatre. (Tickets ($17-$24): 859-957-1940.) Davis has assembled a strong cast for this family-friendly comedy, you can catch a few of them in this charming promotional video:Still onstage are several recommended productions: The Mountaintop at Ensemble Theatre (final extended performance is Saturday evening; 513-421-3555); A Delicate Ship at the Cincinnati Playhouse (through April 20; 513-421-3888; CityBeat review here); and The Twentieth-Century Way at Know Theatre (through May 3; CityBeat review here.) And if Monday comes and you want still more: Check out True Theatre's next installment — True Dating (7:30 p.m. at Know Theatre). This round of monologues of real experiences will feature stories of dating that led to true love, and some that went off the tracks along the way. Tickets ($15): 513-300-5669.
 
 
by Rick Pender 04.08.2014
Posted In: Theater at 03:18 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door image for 10-4 - seven spots on the sun - cincy playhouse - photo sandy underwood

Playhouse World Premiere 'Seven Spots on the Sun' Earns National Recognition

Actors Theatre’s Humana Festival is indeed a launching pad for exciting new works. That makes its final weekend the perfect moment for the American Theatre Critics Association to recognize a set of outstanding plays produced at regional theaters during 2013. None of the 2013 Humana Festival shows was nominated, but one of the three works to win a significant cash prize ($7,500) was Martín Zimmerman’s Seven Spots on the Sun, given its world premiere at the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park last fall. The play blends magical realism and political issues in an affecting tale examining if forgiveness is truly possible. Set in a Central American nation ravaged by civil war, lust, plague and a consuming need for vengeance, it’s about a widowed doctor in a small village and a newly-married soldier charged with subduing dissent. Their journeys towards redemption converge in some painful ways. The top prize ($25,000) went to Lauren Gunderson for her play I and You, about a cranky high school student who needs a liver transplant. A smart, athletic classmate recruits her to help him finish a school project focused on Whitman’s Leaves of Grass. As their unlikely relationship evolves, they explore the meaning of life and death without a shred of condescension or pretentiousness. I and You was staged last October at Marin Theatre Company in California, where Jasson Minadakis, who founded Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, is now artistic director and nurtured the development of Gunderson’s script. Her play Toil & Trouble was presented locally last summer by Know Theatre.
 
 

A Delicate Ship (Review)

Playhouse world premiere brings another excellent new play and writer to Cincinnati audiences

0 Comments · Friday, March 28, 2014
The Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park hit a home run with its world premiere of Anna Ziegler’s A Delicate Ship on the Shelterhouse stage.  

Pride and Prejudice (Review)

Cincinnati Playhouse takes on beloved Austen characters

0 Comments · Friday, March 21, 2014
Jane Austen’s familiar characters in Pride and Prejudice have all but taken on the status of real people. Everyone who loves this 1813 novel of love and manners “knows” Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy, to be sure...  

Coming to a Theater Near You

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 5, 2014
Blake Robison wants the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park to be at the forefront of Cincinnati’s cultural conversation. “It’s our responsibility to bring the best theatrical material, both old and new, to our community," he says.  
by Rick Pender 03.03.2014
Posted In: Theater at 07:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
onstage_blake robison - photo sarah bradley

Playhouse in the Park Announces 2014-15 Season

Season ahead includes homegrown works, award-winning shows and a couple of musicals

The Cincinnati Playhouse announced its 2014-15 season on Monday. I’m especially looking forward to Peter and the Starcatcher, Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike and Circle Mirror Transformation, as well as the premiere production, Safe House. Here’s what’s coming our way, in chronological order: Jeffrey Hatcher’s new whodunit featuring the world’s favorite detective, Sherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Suicide Club. (Marx Theatre, Sept. 6-Oct. 4, 2014)I Loved, I Lost, I Made Spaghetti, adapted from foodie Giulia Melucci’s hilarious memoir. (Shelterhouse Theatre, Sept. 27-Oct. 26, 2014)A world premiere by up-and-coming playwright and Cincinnati native Keith Josef Adkins, Safe House, inspired by his Kentucky ancestors. (Marx Theatre, Oct. 18-Nov. 15, 2014)Tenderly: The Rosemary Clooney Musical, which traces America’s favorite girl singer from her Cincinnati childhood and Hollywood stardom to triumphant comeback. It’s by the local team of composer Janet Yates Vogt and writer Mark Friedman. (Shelterhouse Theatre, Nov. 15-Dec. 28)The season also includes Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, back for its 24th year. (Marx Theatre, Nov. 26-Dec. 28, 2014)A new version of the recent Broadway show, Ring of Fire: The Music of Johnny Cash, directed by and featuring the star of the Broadway production, Jason Edwards. (Marx Theatre, Jan. 17-Feb. 15, 2015)The second U.S. production of an offbeat love story, Chapatti, a tasty new comedy of misadventures involving love and pets. (Shelterhouse Theatre, Feb. 7-March 8, 2015)Peter and the Starcatcher, the magical, family-friendly Peter Pan prequel that hooked five Tony Awards. (Marx Theatre, March 7-April 4, 2015)A compelling, darkly funny new play by Tracey Scott Wilson, Buzzer, getting its world premiere at Chicago’s Goodman Theatre this month. (Shelterhouse Theatre, March 21-April 19, 2015)The 2013 Tony Award-winning best play, Christopher Durang’s hit comedy Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, full of echoes of Anton Chekhov. (Marx Theatre, April 25-May 23, 2015)The comic off-Broadway hit Circle Mirror Transformation, winner of the 2009 Obie Award for best new American play. (Shelterhouse Theatre, May 9-June 7, 2015) In a recent conversation, Artistic Director Blake Robison described his program priorities and told me the Playhouse takes them seriously. “Variety is one of our hallmarks. We’re always going to make sure there are new works and culturally diverse works and that there are family-friendly or multigenerational things. We will find ways to continue to support and entertain the traditional audience while reaching out in various directions to new audiences. It’s our responsibility to bring the best theatrical material both old and new to our community.”  I’d say Robison’s third season sticks to his priorities.
 
 

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