WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Kevin Osborne 04.26.2012
Posted In: News, Environment, Family at 09:57 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
pollution

Cincinnati is 8th Worst for Air Pollution

Lung Association: Region is slowly improving

Cincinnati and Hamilton County fared poorly on a national list of places with polluted air that was released Wednesday.The Cincinnati-Middletown-Wilmington metropolitan region ranked as the eighth-worst for air particle pollution, according to the American Lung Association.Meanwhile, Hamilton County was given an “F” grade for its number of high ozone days, and a “D” grade for air particle pollution by the Lung Association.The rankings were included in the group’s “State of the Air 2012” report. The annual air quality report grades cities and counties based, in part, on the color-coded Air Quality Index developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to alert the public to daily unhealthy air conditions.The 13th annual report uses the most recent, quality-controlled EPA data collected from 2008-10 from official monitors for ozone and particle pollution, the two most widespread types of air pollution. Counties are graded for ozone, year-round particle pollution and short-term particle pollution levels. Also, the report uses the EPA’s calculations for year-round particle levels.Generally, the report found that air quality in America’s most polluted cities was at its cleanest since the organization’s annual report began 13 years ago. This year’s report details the trend that standards set under the Clean Air Act to cleanup major air pollution sources — including coal-fired power plants, diesel engines, and SUVs — are working to drastically cut ozone (smog) and particle pollution (soot) from the air. Despite this progress, unhealthy levels of air pollution still exist and in some parts of the nation worsened.More than 40 percent of people in the United States live in areas where air pollution continues to threaten their health. That means more than 127 million people are living in counties with dangerous levels of either ozone or particle pollution that can cause wheezing and coughing, asthma attacks, heart attacks or premature death.The Cincinnati region ranked 21st for high ozone days out of 277 metropolitan areas. Also, it ranked 39th for 24-hour air particle pollution.Still, the region is improving. The region has had 19.4 fewer high ozone days annually on average since 1996, and 10 fewer high-particle pollution days since 2000.
 
 
by Hannah McCartney 04.26.2012
at 01:32 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
first energy

Cincinnati Chooses Green Energy Aggregation

Decision makes Cincinnati first major U.S. city to offer 100 percent green electricity

After spending several weeks reviewing requests for proposals (RFPs) from seven energy providers as part of Cincinnati’s initiative to power homes using energy aggregation, a decision has been made — and it’s a green one. Cincinnati has selected First Energy Solutions (FES) as the city’s new electricity provider, which will make it the first major city in the U.S. to use a 100 percent “green” electricity supply. The aggregation process works like this: All eligible individual customers “pool” their buying power to form a larger unit, which holds more leverage to negotiate lower prices on electricity. Cincinnati voters passed a ballot in November 2011 to approve the city's efforts to choose an energy aggregation provider. The designation of FES's energy supply as "green" energy doesn't mean that residents will see windmills and solar panels popping up across the city's landscape; rather, the energy will be designated "green" based on non-tangible renewable energy credits (RECs), which each represent proof that one megawatt-hour (MWh) of electricity has been sourced from a "renewable" energy resource. FES will provide the city with enough RECs to power all interested consumers' homes, meaning no home opted-in to the aggregation power will use electricity sourced from non-renewable resources such as coal. The city's possession of those RECs will represent the commitment to sourcing electricity in residents' homes from renewable, green resources. Some of the RECs provided to the city by FES will reportedly be sourced from local energy sources, including the University of Cincinnati's generating facility and the Cincinnati Zoo's Solar Canopy Project, although those sources will be a small component of the overall REC collection, according to Larry Falkin, Director for the Office of Environmental Quality. “Not only will we be able to put real money back in people’s pockets, but this establishes the city as a leader in supporting green energy choices,” said Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls, who spearheaded the push to provide consumers with an energy aggregation option nearly two years ago. Over the next several weeks, Cincinnati will work to negotiate a contact with FES, and residents will receive information about FES’s services.   Residents who aren't interested in participating in the city's green aggregation efforts will be required to opt-out before the services are implemented. FES will notify all eligible customers and those who don't want to participate must reply to be opted out. There will be no cost to enroll in the FES program.According to the city’s press release, FES will save the average household about $133 each year on electricity bills. The switch could become effective by June.
 
 

Sittenfeld Wants Litter Law Change

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 25, 2012
Cincinnati officials are hoping to give property owners more of an incentive to clean up their yards. City Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld has proposed changing Cincinnati’s litter laws to allow for a full refund of fines for first-time violators if they remedy the problem within 10 days of being cited.   

More Test Erasures Flagged at Taft

1 Comment · Wednesday, April 25, 2012
A state-contracted analysis of Ohio Graduation Tests last year flagged seven individual answer sheets at Robert A. Taft Information Technology High School for having a suspiciously high ratio of erasures resulting in wrong-to-right answers.   

Differing Forecasts

Union: CPS using faulty budget model to make cuts

1 Comment · Wednesday, April 25, 2012
Cincinnati’s beleaguered public school system, faced with a projected $43 million budget gap for next year, slashed 10 percent of its teaching staff April 17. In a special session, the school board voted unanimously to eliminate at least 237 jobs, saving the district around $20 million.    

Cincinnati vs. The World 4.25.12

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 25, 2012
Among other things, Friday, April 20 marked the two-year anniversary of BP’s Deepwater Horizon rig explosion, which leaked nearly 5 million barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico before the well was plugged. Disturbing accounts of deformed aquatic life have recently surfaced, including fish plagued with mysterious ulcers, eyeless shrimp and crabs missing legs.  

Full Steam Ahead

Locals put Cincinnati on the map of steampunk empire

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 25, 2012
“I’m known to many as Aloysius Fox, and I am actually British,” says the enigmatic founder of The League of Cincinnati Steampunks. Though role-playing is a significant part of the literary genre-turned-cultural movement, Aloysius assures that his charming European swagger is, in fact, authentic (he notes that he moved to the States from Britain in the mid-1990s).   

A Combo Platter

With Tramp, evolving singer/songwriter Sharon Van Etten opens up to collaboration

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 24, 2012
Sharon Van Etten began winning admirers with a pair of intimate, soul-bearing albums — 2009’s Because I Was In Love and 2010’s Epic — that explored love gone bad via a voice that was so big and expressive and sad-sounding that one feared for the woman from which it was emanating.   

Reds’ Slow Start No Reason for Panic

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 24, 2012
One of the great beauties of baseball is that one pitch can mean everything and one game can mean nothing. The Reds are off to a slow start, winning seven of their first 16 games. It’s not ideal and wins in April count as much as wins in September, but it’s baseball — every team loses roughly one-third of its games.   
by Hannah McCartney 04.23.2012
at 12:38 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
ddddddd

Cincinnati Electric Car Club To Meet May 10

Inaugural meeting open to all

Ever thought about jumping aboard the electric car train? Do your research and communicate with others also seeking more sustainable methods of transportation. The inaugural meeting of the Cincinnati Electric Car Club will be held at 6:30 p.m. May 10 at Cincinnati Hybrid at 6403 Madison Road. The meeting is open to all community members, especially targeted to those thinking about buying or building an electric vehicle seeking a support group, anyone who wants to further advocate the use of electric cars in Cincinnati, or current hybrid or plug-in electric cars hoping to network with other owners. If you own a hybrid or an electric car already, you're encouraged to bring your car along so it can be put on display along with others. Because the club is a recent development, the first meeting will discuss strategies for future meetings and the club's purpose as a whole. Here is an itinerary, according to a press release, for the first meeting:6:30-7 p.m.: Examine hybrid and fully electric vehicles on display and chat informally with the cars' owners. 7-7:30 p.m.: Brief presentations by Duke Energy about their electric fleet and charging infrastructure and Cincinnati Hybrid on maintaining and servicing electric vehicles. 7:30-8:30: The first organizational meeting will seek input on the group's goals, how it should be organized, future activities and meeting frequency. RSVP to Steve Johns at steve.johns@cincinnati-oh.gov if you'd like to attend. Be sure to indicate if you have a hybrid or electric vehicle you'd like to display.
 
 

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