WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Rick Pender 08.17.2012
Posted In: Theater at 11:19 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
onstage 8-15 - xanadu at the carnegie - photo matt steffen

Stage Door: 'Xanadu' and You

If it weren't for the Carnegie's production of Xanadu, there wouldn't much to point you for theater choices in mid-August. I'm happy to report that the judges from the League of Cincinnati Theatres and I  are in agreement that this frothy piece of roller-disco and Greek mythology is a great piece of silly entertainment. (Review here.) It's great to see the work of Alan Patrick Kenny onstage again in Cincinnati. I should mention that this show constituted his master's thesis for his graduate degree from U.C.L.A., and his advisors came to town to pass judgment on it. They apparently gave him a passing grade, completing his academic efforts and green-lighting him for his new job teaching musical theater at the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point. I hope it's not too long before he gets another gig locally, but in the meantime, I bet the folks in central Wisconsin will be highly entertained. If you want to catch Xanadu, you should call for tickets now, since the positive buzz means that tickets will be getting snapped up between now and the final performance on Aug. 26. Box office: 859-957-1940. One other show that some of you might find entertaining is Rounding Third, on board the Showboat Majestic. It's about two wildly different guys coaching a Little League team — one is a win-at-all-costs kind of guy, the other is a geek who just wants the kids to have fun. You can imagine the fireworks. The LCT judging panel recommended it, and I can say that it's got two solid actors performing it. I thought the script was a tad predictable, but it's got some good laughs, and if you love baseball (or if you played Knothole ball here in Cincinnati) you'll find a lot to identify with. Box office: 513-241-6550.
 
 

Star Gazing

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 15, 2012
If you spent some of last spring watching the TV series Smash, you learned that Broadway producers look for talent whose names attract audiences. The commercial concerns of Broadway producers are surely a big factor in their decision-making, especially how much magnetism a star can bring. This led me to speculate whether we have bankable stars in Cincinnati.  

Xanadu (Review)

Old cult favorite's strange magic charms audiences at the Carnegie

0 Comments · Monday, August 13, 2012
Summers in Cincinnati tend to have theater in short supply. Thanks to the Carnegie Center in Covington, there’s a bounty of fizzy fun in the form of the very tongue-in-cheek musical Xanadu, staged by Alan Patrick Kenny.  
by Rick Pender 08.10.2012
Posted In: Theater at 10:36 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Stage Door: 'Xanadu' and 'Rounding Third'

The theater scene is still in vacation mode this weekend, so there are only a few choices. Your best sure bet is the final weekend of The Hound of the Baskervilles at Cincinnati Shakespeare Company through Sunday. [REVIEW LINK]I suspect if you're a Sherlock Holmes fan with a sense of humor, you'll love this production: It does follow the plot of Sir Arthur Conan-Doyle's ace detective's greatest adventure, but it does so in a very tongue-in-cheek and slapstick manner. It's also a romp for three actors who play all the roles, including veteran CSC actor Jeremy Dubin who is Holmes as well as all the villains (or potential villains) in the piece. It's as much fun watching the trio do quick costume changes as it is following the story of a cursed family on a remote moor in Northern England. It's been a busy box office for this production, so be sure to call in advance if you want a ticket. 513-381-2273, x1. The Carnegie Center's production of Xanadu doesn't open until Saturday, but the odds are good that it will be worth seeing since it's being staged by wunderkind director Alan Patrick Kenny. Read more about Kenny here. The musical is based on the cult-favorite cinematic flop from 1980, reinvented more recently as a stage production by a clever creative team. Kenny, who dazzled local audiences for three years with productions at New Stage Collective (2007-2009), returns for a brief directing stint before he moves off to Stevens Point, Wisc., where he'll be teaching theater at a University of Wisconsin campus. He's spent the past two years studying directing at UCLA — and being engaged in some creative staging and a bit of professional work, too, while on the West Coast. He's one of the most inventive and fearless directors to stage work in Cincinnati in recent years, so Xanadu at the Carnegie s a production that's probably going to draw a crowd. (It's only having eight performances, through Aug. 26. Box office: 859-957-1940. I saw the Showboat Majestic's Rounding Third when it opened on Wednesday evening. It's a tale of dads who coach Little League baseball from very different perspectives. I'm afraid the script is rife with cliches and stereotypes, but the actors — it's a two-man show; when they address the team, they're talking to the audience — capture the essence of their characters. Mike Sherman plays a win-at-all-costs head coach while Michael Schlotterbeck is a gentle nebbish who's trying to connect with his geeky son by offering to be an assistant coach. They're differing philosophies are the meat of the story, and they do end up learning from one another — although the story is pretty predictable from the get-go. Nevertheless, a baseball story in August might be just the thing you're looking for in some summer entertainment. 513-241-6550.
 
 

Never Been Mellow

Alan Kenny stops by to stage 'Xanadu' on his way to a promising theater career

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 8, 2012
Cincinnati native Alan Kenny, fresh from graduate studies and a nearly completed master’s degree from UCLA, is back in town to stage the campy musical Xanadu at Covington’s Carnegie Center. It opens on Saturday for an eight-performance run, through Aug. 26.   

The Hound of the Baskervilles (Review)

CSC's adept cast has a ball

0 Comments · Sunday, July 29, 2012
The process of translating clichés into high humor is a delicate one. Luckily for Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, the able three actors assembled for a very tongue-in-cheek retelling of the Sherlock Holmes tale The Hound of the Baskervilles know their way around slapstick and shtick.  
by Rick Pender 08.03.2012
Posted In: Theater at 09:09 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
to do - hound of baskervilles @ cincy shakes - magnifying glass (l-r, brent vimtrup, jeremy dubin & nick rose) - photo jeanna vella

Stage Door: Cincy Shakes to the Rescue

Light entertainment is what most of us are looking for onstage during August, and Cincinnati Shakespeare Company has just the answer: The Hound of the Baskervilles. The amusing script takes Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's class Sherlock Holmes tale and turns it into a silly romp around the moor. CSC's cast of three veteran performers — Nick Rose, Jeremy Dubin and Brent Vimtrup — have just the right attitude to keep it amusing from start to finish without becoming tiresome. That's also due to the work of director Michael Evan Haney. He's the longtime associate artistic director at the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, and he's done fine work on other stages locally, but this is his debut with Cincy Shakes. It's a fine partnership, building on his experience with a similar show — a funny romp through Around the World in 80 Days that entertained Playhouse/Shelterhouse audiences several years back and then moved on to New York City where it had a successful run at the Irish Repertory Theatre. Hound is like drinking fine English tea from a dribble cup. Review here. Tickets: 513-381-2273, x1. While other theaters are largely dormant, the folks at Cincy Shakes are very busy in August. In addition to the aforementioned production at their Race Street theater, they also launch their Shakespeare in the Park series this weekend with a performance of The Tempest at Seasongood Pavilion in Eden Park. It gets its first outing on Saturday evening at 7 p.m. Go to cincyshakes.com for more dates and locations. These are free performances, so they're definitely worth checking out. And in case you need a reminder that we have a great theater scene locally, here's a tidbit. The Phoenix Theatre in Indianapolis just announced its 2012-2013 season; this is a fine theater company, rather like Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati in its presentation of new works. But they're touting their September production of Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson as the "Midwest Premiere," and they've given a similar designation to their January-February staging of next to normal. Um, I'm sorry to burst their bubble, but those shows have already been onstage here in Cincinnati (and I believe we're in the Midwest). Both were produced last season. In fact, ETC offered next to normal last September (not long after the Tony and Pulitzer prize winner closed in New York) and  already presented a sold-out revival in June. Know Theatre gave us the hard-rockin' version of our seventh president in a heavily sold run last spring. So the Indy theater's claims are more than a bit overblown. But we'll let them believe their own hype, and aren't we smug that we didn't have to leave town to see those shows. That being said, the Phoenix is offering Seminar, a snarky drama by Cincinnati native Theresa Rebeck (her play Dead Accounts had its world premiere at the Cincinnati Playhouse back in January) this fall (Oct. 25-Nov. 25) and Nicky Silver's dark comedy The Lyons next spring (Feb. 28-March 31). Both could be worth the drive. www.phoenixtheatre.org.
 
 

Shakespeare Al Fresco

0 Comments · Tuesday, July 31, 2012
Rather than focus on one venue, Cincinnati Shakespeare Company delivers its Shakespeare in the Park Tour to more than a dozen parks and outdoor venues throughout the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky area. The first of CSC’s touring performances will be on Saturday with the 7 p.m. opening of The Tempest at Seasongood Pavilion in Eden Park.  
by Rick Pender 07.27.2012
Posted In: Theater at 09:16 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
todo_onstage_weddingsinger_hollyyurchison

Stage Door: 'Wedding Singer' and 'Hound of the Baskervilles'

I can't say that a musical based on the Adam Sandler film The Wedding Singer is going to be either edifying or educational for a bunch of teens. But I can assure you that the kids from all over the region involved in Cincinnati Young People's Theatre, which opens its production of the show tonight, will be having a blast at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts. I bet their good times with this goofy show will mean contagious entertainment for everyone who shows up to see it. Whether they're related to the kids or not! It's onstage through Aug. 5. Box office: 513-241-6550. It appears that Cincinnati Shakespeare Company has a summertime hit on its hands with its very tongue-in-cheek staging of The Hound of the Baskervilles using three of its best actors. The show opened a week ago and there is so much demand for tickets that CSC has added matinee performances through the production's three-week run. Several performances have completely sold out. It's directed by Michael Evan Haney, associate artistic director at the Cincinnati Playhouse and one of our area's best at staging witty and complicated pieces — his Cincinnati Playhouse production of Around the World in Eighty Days was a big hit several seasons back (it used four actors) and it moved on to a well-received run in New York City. While Hound retells the well known Sherlock Holmes tale, it does it with actors in multiple roles (Jeremy Dubin, who portrays Holmes, for instance, also plays all the villains) and a lot of visual humor and slapstick physicality. Through Aug. 12. Box office: 513-381-2273. Each week in Stage Door, Rick Pender offers theater tips for the weekend, often with a few pieces of theater news.
 
 

Encore! Encore!

Looking back on another top-notch Cincinnati theater season

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 25, 2012
If you want to know the “best” shows in New York City, you need only check which Broadway productions are nominated annually for Tony Awards. In fact, the Big Apple has tons of awards to recognize and honor theatrical work. Not so in Cincinnati.  

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