WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Tech N9ne

Oct. 27 • Bogart's

0 Comments · Monday, October 21, 2013
Rolling Stone recently dubbed Tech N9ne “the hardest-working rapper,” and this calendar year is potent proof of that assertion.     

Valerie June

Oct. 24 • Southgate House Revival

0 Comments · Monday, October 21, 2013
 If you think of Americana music as a delicious home-cooked stew of Blues, Soul, Country, Folk, Gospel, acoustic-guitar meditation and funky Rock reverie, then you’ll have an idea of what to expect from Valerie June.    
by Mike Breen 10.22.2013
Posted In: Local Music, Music Commentary, Reviews at 04:02 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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REVIEW: Dark Colour - 'Prisoner'

In Electronic music, the punkish encouragement to “just jump in and see what happens,” regardless of proficiency, resulted in the creation of Krautrock, Hip Hop, Synthpop, New Wave and many other styles. Some of the top innovators of those genres were driven by a “naïvite” that added a more “human” element (going against the common critique that all Electronic music is cold and robotic). Today, with the hugely increased access to affordable tools to create Electronic music, that more exploratory approach is back and thriving, resulting in innumerable subgenres and an unending stream of adventurous bedroom artists. Cincinnati’s Randall Rigdon, Jr., is one of those bedroom maestros. Using the name Dark Colour (fleshed out with other musicians in a live setting), Rigdon doesn’t let all of those subgenres distract him, instead embracing a variety of Electro styles and putting them together in his own personalized way. The results are delectable. Dark Colour’s recent full-length debut, Prisoner, is reminiscent of hearing things like New Order, LCD Soundsystem, MGMT or Neon Indian for the first time. Rigdon has solid writing and lyrical skills, but it’s the multi-hued textures, kaleidoscopic array of synth sounds, endearing beats and a shifting ambiance (showcasing his deft ability to create distinct moods) that set Dark Colour apart from the EDM pack. Prisoner (which follows 2011's debut EP, Memories, a release that was pulled from shelves after a dispute over an uncleared sample) ranges from Ambient dreamscapes and artsy Indie Electronica to funky Chillwave and bubbling Electro Pop, with many tracks containing multiple elements of each. Frequently slathered with a trippy glaze of effects, Rigdon’s melodies are most often delivered in either a hushed, spectral murmur or a whirling falsetto, while the eclectic, always-danceable beats have a surprisingly live feel, even when resembling something conjured from an ancient drum machine. There’s also a refreshing lack of current dancefloor trends; not that it would kill the album, but dropping in a grinding Dubstep groove, for example, would totally break its often hypnotic spell.On Prisoner, Dark Colour makes digital music with an analog heart, instantly catchy Electro Art Pop that never panders and frequently surprises. Learn more about Dark Colour here and give a listen to Prisoner below.Prisoner by Dark Colour
 
 
by Mike Breen 10.21.2013
Posted In: Live Music, Live Stream at 12:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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REVIEW: The Frankl Project - 'Standards'

With its first three releases and about a decade worth of live shows across the region, The Frankl Project has honed a sound that has earned notice for its crafty blend of Rock, Pop, Punk and Ska. But the Cincinnati trio’s recent album, Standards, showcases the sound of a band finding its own unique voice and running with it.  While those aforementioned influences are still evident, the group skillfully and more subtly integrates them into something they can completely call its own. What hasn’t changed is that The Frankls (drummer/singer Joseph Frankl, guitarist/singer Jacob Tippey and bassist/singer Paul Schroder) still write excellent songs featuring hooks a plenty and often anthem-ready, spine-tingling choruses. But the variety of the album and the way the trio presents the songs is what makes Standards so magnetic.  Unlike most Pop Rock bands (especially ones that have a “Punk” element or pedigree), The Frankl Project doesn’t try to overload its tracks with giant-sounding guitars that fill every nook and cranny, opting instead to leave lots of space to create a distinctly airy aura. Allowing the tracks to breathe and rise and fall without resorting to predictable dynamics recalls the less-is-more approach that Indie Rock stars Spoon do so well and makes Standards a gripping listening experience. With that sonic elbowroom, the musicians’ intriguing individual parts are more perceptible (Frankl, in particular, is an incredibly musical drummer and his parts — like Tippey’s guitar work — are often captivating) and add to The Frankls’ uniqueness. But the stellar songwriting is still the primary focus.  The album kicks off with “Alive on the Road,” a swaying rocker that soars on the three musicians’ airtight harmonies, while “My Hands” has a rootsy sway that would make Jay Farrar nod along approvingly. After a string of heart-swelling, evocative Pop songs, the band throws in a few curves, like the jazzy but intense “Heart Shapes & Hand Grenades,” the quirky but still resonant Indie Pop gem “Find Your Way,” the ghostly, slow-burning “Chai Bones” and the album’s most rocking track, “The Ottoman.” If Weezer, Bad Veins, Ben Folds Five, Sunny Day Real Estate and Band of Horses every decided to make an album together and hired a producer with expert knowledge on how to utilize atmosphere as another instrument (like Joe Henry, Brian Eno or Daniel Lanois), it might sound like an unfocused patchwork of lazy, hazy Pop. But, if they (and you) were lucky, it would sound more like The Frankl Project’s impressively creative Standards.  Visit thefranklproject.com for more about Standards and The Frankl Project. Standards by The Frankl Project
 
 

Les Claypool’s Duo de Twang

Oct. 19 • Madison Theater

0 Comments · Tuesday, October 15, 2013
Les Claypool is primarily known for fronting his band Primus, but he has also proven to be a diverse, intelligent and unique bass player who can throw down with a variety of other artists in a wide array of genres.  

The Spits

Oct. 17 • Mayday

0 Comments · Tuesday, October 15, 2013
Now based in Seattle, The Spits roared out of Kalamazoo, Mich., in 2000 with a self-appointed mission to make “Punk for the People,” a slogan they’ve made into their rallying cry.   

Built to Spill

Oct. 22 • Southgate House Revival

0 Comments · Tuesday, October 15, 2013
Now comes word that Built to Spill is working on what will be its eighth full-length studio effort, which we’re told will probably drop in late 2014. Until then, the band has embarked on an extensive tour, which is good news for those of us who like to get lost in sound — Built to Spill’s epic guitar reveries are even more immersive in a live setting.  

Tim Easton

Oct. 13 • MOTR Pub

0 Comments · Tuesday, October 8, 2013
 Easton’s released a slew of Americana-flavored records since parting ways with Haynes Boys in the late ’90s, each time touring across America and Europe, playing for the type of small but mostly appreciative crowds that might discourage lesser men.  

David Bromberg Band

Oct. 10 • 20th Century Theater

0 Comments · Tuesday, October 8, 2013
Bromberg may be the most famous nobody in music, but he’s somebody you can’t afford to miss.  

The SteelDrivers

Oct. 11 • Southgate House Revival

0 Comments · Tuesday, October 8, 2013
The band is made up of various Bluegrass and Country music veterans who are out to bring intensity in sound, great musicianship, solid songwriting and an open mind to the Bluegrass genre.    

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