WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Samantha Gellin 12.04.2014 14 days ago
Posted In: Commentary at 01:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
from the copy editor

From the Copy Desk

In case you need a dictionary with the Dec. 3 issue of CityBeat

Afternoon readers! Now that Thanksgiving is over, it's back to the normal grind, at least until Christmas. I hope everyone was able to stuff themselves with turkey and spend time with loved ones. Let's get to Words Nobody Uses or Knows in this week's issue, which, by the way, includes a lovely piece on Ohio's historical markers.Best word of the issue: cineastes, which appears in TT Stern-Enzi's art piece about MUBI, an innovative new film-streaming service for the "cinematic-minded."cineastes: plural of cineaste; a film or movie enthusiast, a person involved in filmmaking (n.)It's an obvious definition, but one I had never heard before.  In this issue: "Since signing up, I have embarked on an old-school word of mouth campaign in support of MUBI, whispering in the ears of cineastes in my inner circle, teasing them with hints about its possibilities."Next best word is Gramaphone, capital G, found in Stacy Sim's review of Failure: A Love Story. Ancestor to the megaphone? A phone your grandma owns?Neither. According to Wikipedia, the Gramaphone is a phonograph, the first device for recording and replaying sound (n.) In this issue: "There are three lovely Graces (Sophia Dewald, Megan Urz, Molly Watson) who narrate rapid-fire the events of the play, a strong Ensemble (Gabby Francis, Colin Kissel, Sarah Allen Shull and Andrew Wiemann) of clocks, birds, a dog, snake and various others, plus a smooth jazz onstage band with vocals to contribute the Gramophone soundtrack."Mathcore was the next word that caught my eye. Sounds like a really, really unpleasant type of math course. (But I find all types of math unpleasant.) It's in Sound Advice.Mathcore: a rhythmically complex and dissonant style of metalcore. It has its roots in bands such as Converge, Coalesce, Botch and The Dillinger Escape Plan. The term mathcore is suggested by analogy with math rock. (n.)Looking up the definition of a music genre is a bit like jumping into a rabbit hole. Each one one is derived from or related to another genre of music that I've never heard of. (If I'm being honest, most of the music genres I've learned feel like a joke.) What is math rock? What is metalcore? It's obvious that I'm no music expert (hell, when I started to work here I thought there was, like, 10 genres tops) but I can't be the only one who has never heard of mathcore.  In this issue: "Beyond their Spinal Tappish propensity to blow up bassists, Every Time I Die has earned a solid reputation as a scorching live outfit and a stylistically diverse band that has attracted Metal fans of every conceivable sub-stripe, as well as Mathcore and Punk aficionados."Moving on. Next on the list is commensurate, in Kathy Y. Wilson's thought-provoking piece "On Being White."commensurate: equal in measure of size; coextensive. corresponding in extent or degree; proportionate. (adj.)In this issue: "Four: It doesn’t take a sociologist or statistician to know that white officers just do not shoot and kill white kids at commensurate rates that they shoot black kids." Not exactly an uplifting note to end our vocab lesson on, but if you want something to chew on for awhile, read Kathy's piece.  Have a good weekend, readers.
 
 

Novel Ideas

National Novel Writing Month creates an authentic, inclusive writing culture in Cincinnati

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 3, 2014
NaNoWriMo participants in Cincinnati may not end up publishing their novels, but like many authentic artistic experiences shared with family, students or strangers, the benefits of NaNoWriMo lie in the process, not the product.  

Like Fluttering Pages

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 8, 2014
I wasn’t then and neither am I now a journalist. I have always been a writer.  
by Amber Hemmerle 03.05.2014
Posted In: Commentary at 12:23 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
pert jetson copy

Determination

A few weeks ago when I was heading to the CityBeat office I encountered a woman who changed my perspective on many things. It was one of those "Everything happens for a reason, even if you don't know the reason yet" moments.  I parked in the Elm Street lot, paid the machine my $3.50 and walked towards Race Street as usual. It was cold outside and my hands were full with coffee, a notebook, my lunch and purse.  I was running late — also as usual — when a woman approached me. Looking back now, I can’t even recall how she sounded or what she looked like.  Our conversation went something like this: "Would you help someone in need if you could?" she asked. "Umm, depends...Why?" "I'm selling my poems for $2 so I can have extra money to pay for my son's birthday." "I don't even know if I have $2, hold on. I'm kind of in a hurry...Oh, wait…Here, I do have it." I had three single dollar bills in my wallet and I handed her two of them.  "Thank you, God bless you," she said. We made our transaction and parted ways. Her poems were typed, printed and covered by a clear paper protector. She continued up Elm toward Vine Street as I turned the corner. As I waited for the elevator, I began reading her poems. That's spelled wrong, I thought. That needs an apostrophe. It’s "to," not "too." I picked out a laundry list of grammatical and technical errors and immediately dismissed her work. I looked at her poems, but I didn't actually read them.  A few days later one of the ice and snowstorms hit the Tri-state area again. I wondered if anyone was out in this weather because I was certainly not leaving the comfort of my bed for any reason.  I don’t know why, but I began thinking about the woman who approached me on the street earlier in the week. I wondered if she was out there, in that terrible weather, selling her poems. Had she needed the $2 that badly? Did she ever get to have her son’s birthday party? All of these thoughts washed over me. I pictured her, the image I had created of her, sitting at the library typing up the poems she had written while her son was at school.  I pictured her taking her last few dollars to buy the transparent paper protectors at the dollar store and preparing them for the next day when she would hit the streets to sell them. A feeling of shame had overcome me. How could I dismiss what she had written because of a few errors that had no real effect on the message of her poems?  This woman had already probably sold more of her writing than me, and that’s what I am paying thousands of dollars in tuition for: to sell my words.  One of her poems is titled Determination, which is what she has and I was too blind to see that at the time we met.  I might have some of the editing experience now, but when I first started writing those were skills I didn’t possess or even care about.  I didn’t care if I needed a comma here or there, I didn’t care if I used the wrong form of “to” or ended a sentence with a preposition. I simply wanted to write.  I lost the passion behind my own words because I’ve been so worried about being technically correct all the time. And trust me, I never even end up being technically correct all the time.  That woman, whoever or wherever she is now, showed me that you don’t need a college degree to have determination. You don’t need to have the perfect sentence or know every grammar rule to express how you feel.  We, as humans, judge people all the time whether we want to admit it or not. We judge people by appearances, by the way they talk, or the way they write in this case. She signed her name at the end of the poems, a signature that I can’t make out very well, but I want to thank her for showing me what real determination is.  Cincinnati prides itself on the local artists, musicians and writers that are bred here. We celebrate them and award them for their talent. I don’t know where this woman is now, but she, and the others just like her who might not be at the open mic nights or in galleries, deserve recognition as well.  To her I say: That was the best $2 I ever spent.
 
 

It's Really Scary to Be a Writer

1 Comment · Thursday, January 3, 2013
It’s pretty widely accepted that creative types — the kind whose work is meant to disseminated — share a common trait: swollen, bulging egos that must constantly be nursed with attention, positive or otherwise. The writer writes, of course, because he likes the sound of his own voice.    

What You See Is What You Get

Larry Gross writes about everyday people doing everyday things

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 30, 2009
The subtitle of Larry Gross’ latest independently published book says everything you need to know about its content, which largely consists of his Living Out Loud columns for CityBeat: “Adventures, Discoveries and Conclusions Made While Exploring a Life — Namely My Own.”   

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