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Forgotten Population

Women’s City Club to host a discussion on ways the criminal justice system is failing women

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 16, 2014
Each week Ohio Justice and Policy Center (OJPC) Executive Director David Singleton visits the Dayton Correctional Institute (DCI). He feels his presence is making a difference — hearing voices that would have otherwise remained silent. He speaks candidly about one of his clients, a woman serving 17 years after shooting her former police officer husband to death.  

Lt. Governor Candidate Blasts Kasich’s Tax Cut Proposal

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 26, 2014
Lt. Governor-candidate Sharen Neuhardt held a press conference on the City Hall front steps March 18 to lament a tax cut proposed by Gov. John Kasich, claiming it furthers his agenda to help Ohio’s top 1 percent.   

Ohio Ranks Poorly in “State of Women” Report

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 2, 2013
In comparison to men, Ohio women have lower incomes, hold fewer leadership roles and disproportionately suffer from the state’s high infant mortality rate.  
by German Lopez 09.27.2013
Posted In: News, Women, Development, Privatization at 08:59 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
ohio statehouse

Morning News and Stuff

Conflicts of interest at JobsOhio, transportation projects approved, Ohio women fare poorly

CityBeat is participating in a City Council candidate forum on Oct. 5. Have any questions you would like to ask candidates? Submit them here. State Auditor Dave Yost says he will investigate the potential conflicts of interest found by the Ohio Ethics Commission for nine of 22 top JobsOhio officials, including six of nine board members. For critics, the conflicts of interest add more concerns about JobsOhio, the privatized development agency that proposes tax breaks for businesses and has been mired in controversy ever since it was set up by Gov. John Kasich and Republicans to replace the Ohio Department of Development. Because the agency is privatized and deals with private businesses, many of its dealings are kept from the public under state law. Republicans argue the secrecy is necessary to allow JobsOhio to more quickly establish job-creating development deals, but Democrats say the secrecy makes it too difficult to hold JobsOhio accountable.A state board approved nearly $3 billion in transportation projects proposed by Kasich, including work on the MLK/I-75 Interchange in Cincinnati that city and state officials say will create thousands of jobs in the region. The projects will require additional state and local money to be fully funded over the next few years. In comparison to men, Ohio women have lower incomes, hold fewer leadership roles and disproportionately suffer from the state’s high infant mortality rate. The issues placed Ohio at No. 30 out of 50 states for women’s issues in a Sept. 25 report from the Center for American Progress (CAP). The report analyzed 36 indicators for women in the categories of economic security, leadership and health; it then graded the states and ranked them based on the grades. CAP, a left-leaning organization, is touting the report to support progressive policies that could help lift women out of such disparities, including the federally funded Medicaid expansion and an increase to minimum wages.Commentary: “Ohio legislator worried a same-sex marriage case will turn the country socialist, make him cry.” Mayoral candidate John Cranley, who’s running against fellow Democrat and Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls, says he doesn’t know if he can stop the parking plan if he’s elected. Cranley explained it will only be possible if the Greater Cincinnati Port Authority doesn’t set up contracts and sell bonds for the deal before the election. Under the parking plan, the city is leasing its parking meters, lots and garages to the Port Authority, which will then hire various private operators to manage the assets. Qualls supports the plan because it will raise money and resources to fund development projects and modernize the city’s parking services, but Cranley argues it cedes too much control over the city’s parking assets. It turns out Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye won’t be removed from Ohio’s education guidelines. State Board of Education President Debe Terhar, a Cincinnati Republican, initially called the book “pornographic” and demanded its removal from the state guidelines, which led the American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio to criticize Terhar and ask her to reconsider her comments. With the latest delay, small businesses won’t be able to enroll online for Obamacare’s marketplaces until November. Until then, small businesses will only be able to sign up by mail, fax or phone. The delay is the latest of a few setbacks for Obamacare, but the rest of the federally run online marketplaces will still launch on Oct. 1 as planned. CityBeat covered statewide efforts to promote and obstruct the marketplaces in further detail here.Gov. Kasich is donating to charity more than $22,000 that he received in campaign contributions from an indicted man. The city has begun work on a retail corridor that will start on Fourth Street and run north through Race Street. The corridor will take years to complete, but city officials say it will be different than previous failed plans. The number of passengers whose trips originate at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport has increased for six straight months, according to airport officials. Data-analysis company Dunnhumby is looking to invest in Cincinnati startups. Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center landed federal money to test vaccines. The contract could prove the largest the hospital has ever obtained, according to The Business Courier. Police in the Netherlands use trained rats to catch criminals.
 
 
by German Lopez 09.26.2013
Posted In: News, Women at 10:21 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cap women report

“State of Women in America” Report Ranks Ohio No. 30 Overall

Report finds state lacks leadership opportunities for women

In comparison to men, Ohio women have lower incomes, hold fewer leadership roles and disproportionately suffer from the state’s high infant mortality rate. The issues placed Ohio at No. 30 out of 50 states for women’s issues in a Sept. 25 report from the Center for American Progress (CAP) titled, “The State of Women in America.” Out of three major categories, Ohio performed worst on leadership roles available to women, ranking No. 37 in the category with a “D” grade. CAP found only 16.7 percent of Ohio’s state-elected executive offices and 37.2 percent of managerial positions are held by women, even though women make up 52 percent of the state’s population. The state performed slightly better in health outcomes for women and obtained a “C-” in the category. The report particularly criticized Ohio for its infant mortality rate of 7.7 deaths for every 1,000 infants — the fourth highest in the nation — and regulations and defunding measures in the recently passed state budget that make reproductive health services less accessible to women. On economic issues, Ohio was relatively on par with the U.S. median and ranked No. 27 with a “C” grade. For every $1 a man makes, an Ohio woman makes 77 cents, which matches the national average. But the results are even worse for minorities: Black women make 66 cents for each dollar a man makes and Hispanic women make 64 cents. Still, with 17.7 percent of Ohio women living in poverty, the state has the No. 19 highest poverty rate for women in the country. The statistics were again worse for minorities: About 36.4 percent of black women and 32.6 percent of Hispanic women in Ohio live in poverty. The CAP report analyzed 36 indicators for women in the categories of economic security, leadership and health. It then graded the states and ranked them based on the grades. Vermont topped the rankings with an “A,” and Oklahoma was at the very bottom with an “F.” CAP, which is an admittedly left-leaning organization, is touting the report to support progressive policies that could help lift women out of such disparities, including the federally funded Medicaid expansion and an increase to minimum wages. “While women have come a long way over the past few decades, much remains to be done to ensure that all women can have a fair shot at success,” said Anna Chu, one of the report’s authors, in a statement. “Today’s report shows that in many states, it is still difficult for women and their families to get ahead, instead of just getting by.”
 
 

Sixteen Legitimate Concerns About Birth and Babies

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 7, 2013
What if the epidural doesn’t kick in? It seems like in every TV birth (I know, I know), they get to the hospital and it’s too late for the epidural. I don’t think I can meditate the pain away like Beyoncé described while giving birth to Blue Ivy.  
by German Lopez 07.29.2013
Posted In: News, Streetcar, Business, Guns at 09:26 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
streetcar

Morning News and Stuff

Streetcar gets executive, businesses call for inclusion, gun control group opens Ohio chapter

John Deatrick is taking over as project executive of the Cincinnati streetcar project, moving on from his previous work as project manager of The Banks. Deatrick’s hiring announcement happened in April, but it was delayed while City Council fixed the project’s budget gap. Deatrick and his team previously won an award for their work at The Banks, and he says he will bring the same scrutiny and success to the streetcar project. A new project manager for The Banks is set to be hired in August. Since the streetcar project’s inception, it has been mired in misrepresentations and political controversy, which CityBeat covered in further detail here. Local business leaders are calling on the city government to change its contracting policies to target minority- and women-owned businesses. Advocates argue the city’s inclusion rates have greatly dropped since Cincinnati did away with its inclusion program in the 1990s, but the city administration points out the rates are likely understated because women- and minority-owned businesses are no longer required to report themselves as minorities or women. The business leaders say the figures are too low regardless, which could have big implications since minority-owned businesses are more likely to hire minorities, who have twice the unemployment rate as white residents. As a result of court rulings, Cincinnati needs to first conduct a disparity study before it makes any changes that specifically target minorities or women. Gabrielle Giffords’s anti-gun violence organization is opening an Ohio chapter to promote legislation that intends to protect both the public and the rights of gun owners. Giffords, a former U.S. representative who survived an assassination attempt, has been touring around the country — at one point coming to Cincinnati — to speak out against gun violence. Gun control legislation failed in the U.S. Senate in April after it fell short of getting 60 votes to overcome procedural hurdles, even though polling shows a clear majority of Americans favor such legislation. Local government funding may be further reduced as a result of recent tax cuts because the Local Government Fund traditionally gets a percent of state tax revenue. Specifically, critics are concerned less state tax revenue will slow down “natural growth” in funding to cities and counties. Last week, an analysis from Policy Matters Ohio found the recently passed two-year state budget already reduces local government funding, following even steeper reductions in the previous budget. The cuts since Gov. John Kasich took office have cost Cincinnati more than $22 million. A traffic camera ban would cost Ohio cities and counties millions of dollars in revenue. Ohio gas prices are starting down this week. Home-schooled and private-school students have a right to play on public school teams because of a provision in the recently passed state budget. When Columbus’ parking meters were upgraded to accept credit cards, revenue jumped by 13.2 percent. Cincinnati’s meters will be upgraded as part of the parking privatization plan.Ohio air bases are undergoing review this week as part of Congress’ attempts to gauge whether the nation’s Air Force is prepared for current and future missions and homeland defense. Slow news day, Enquirer? Florida researchers found “fat shaming” actually perpetuates obesity. It would probably take 300 to 500 piranhas five minutes to strip the flesh off a 180-pound human.
 
 

Women Versus Clothing: WTF Is a Size 8?

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 24, 2013
Chances are if you’ve ever had trouble buttoning a pair of jeans in a fitting room, someone has thrown this adage over the door: “Don’t worry, Marilyn Monroe was a size 16” — along with the next size up.  

Let's Talk About Street Harassment

1 Comment · Wednesday, July 17, 2013
Finding yourself subject to foreign ogles comes with the territory when you’re a female urban-dweller, I’ve accepted. It’s part of the rhythm of every day, and it’s often more an annoyance than an actual physical threat. But it’s a meaningful annoyance.  

Women's Work Never Ends

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 5, 2013
 Think about Hilary Clinton and the string of women married to philandering politicians out there, especially the ones hitting the comeback trail. Some of these women might be standing by their men, but the smart ones aren’t saying all that much about it because they’re too busy getting busy with the next phase of their own lives.   

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