WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

How Does It Feel?

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 5, 2015
Dear Santa Ono: At the risk of putting everybody all up in our business, I am writing you this as a sincere favor — to help you by telling you some key things about yourself, your current station and ways you can redeem yourself and the University of Cincinnati.   
by Danny Cross and Nick Swartsell 07.29.2015 29 days ago
at 12:40 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
dubose

Grand Jury Indicts Officer in Death of Samuel Dubose

Hamilton County prosecutor: Tensing purposely killed Dubose

Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters today announced that a grand jury has indicted University of Cincinnati Police Officer Ray Tensing for the killing of Samuel Dubose during a traffic stop on July 19. Tensing will be arrested and charged with murder. If convicted, he will face life in prison.Deters had harsh words for Tensing, calling his shooting of Dubose “the most asinine act I’ve ever seen a police officer make” and stating that Tensing should never have been a cop in the first place. Deters repeatedly told members of the media that he could not speak candidly about his feelings, at one point calling the traffic stop itself “chicken crap.” Deters said he was shocked by the video and sad for the community. “I couldn't believe it,” Deters said of the body cam footage. “I just could not believe it.”WARNING: GRAPHIC FOOTAGEOfficials played a portion of Tensing’s body cam video at the press conference. The entire video will be made available, Deters said. Deters’ description of the encounter sharply contradicts Tensing’s story. "This does not happen in the United States," Deters said. "People don't get shot for a traffic stop. ... He was simply rolling away."During the press conference, Deters referenced a latter portion of the video showing officers after Tensing shot Dubose discussing what had happened. Deters expressed skepticism toward some of Tensing’s comments after the incident, including his arm being caught in the car. Police will investigate collusion with other officers, Deters said.“He said he got his arm stuck in the steering wheel,” Deters said. “You just have to watch it.”“I think he was making an excuse for a purposeful killing of another person,” Deters added. “That’s what I think.”Tensing’s initial explanation was that Dubose started to drive off during a traffic stop in Mount Auburn over a missing license plate, nearly running him over. Tensing says he was then forced to shoot Dubose in the head because he was being dragged by the car and his life was in danger. Tensing said he suffered minor injuries when he fell to the ground as Dubose’s car rolled away. Dubose's family said they were thankful for the grand jury's decision."I thank God that everything is being uncovered," said Audrey Dubose, Samuel's mother. "This one did not go unsolved and hidden."Audrey Dubose pledged to continue fighting against police injustice, calling for body cameras for all police departments. She said many others have died at the hands of police unnecessarily. "My son was killed by cop unjustly," she said. "I gotta know many more are killed unjustly. I'm going to be on the battlefield for them."City leaders delayed a scheduled a news conference at 2 p.m. in order to let the Dubose family speak after Deters. Officials praised the grand jury's decision, saying that the city simply wanted truth about the incident to come out. Mayor John Cranley called for demonstrators to remain peaceful if they took to the streets. City Manager Harry Black said the Cincinnati Police Department will soon get body cameras similar to the one that played a pivotal role in the Dubose shooting investigation. University of Cincinnati President Santa Ono, meanwhile, revealed that Tensing had been fired from the University of Cincinnati Police Department. He also responded to an earlier suggestion from Deters, who said the school should disband its police force and let CPD patrol campus. Ono said the school has not yet considered that option.More than 500 people including Mayor John Cranley, City Manager Harry Black and State Sen. Cecil Thomas attended Dubose’s funeral services at Church of the Living God in Avondale yesterday, where the father, musician and entrepreneur was laid to rest. His mother and other family members remembered him as a kind and loving man who nevertheless had a deep, sometimes complicated independent streak. Dubose was buried at Landmark Memorial Gardens in Evendale. Until today, Deters had declined to release video footage, a decision that caused protests. Deters said the protests did not affect his decision to finally release the footage. He lauded the protesters for being peaceful and praised the Dubose family. City Manager Black had been briefed on the video and called it “a bad situation,” saying, “someone has died who did not necessarily have to die.” Mayor Cranley met with the Dubose family this morning. Tensing, 25, hasn’t had major disciplinary actions on his record and his superiors have spoken highly of him. He started at UC last year after serving with the Green Hills Police Department, where he started as a part-time officer in 2011. Tensing has retained Stew Matthews, a Cincinnati attorney, for his defense.During the press conference, Deters called for the disbanding of the University of Cincinnati police department. He said he has spoken with UC’s president and Cincinnati police about disbanding the unit, replacing it with CPD. “I just don’t think a university should be in a policing business,” Deters said. “I just don’t. I think CPD should be doing the entire campus.” Black Lives Matter has scheduled a rally for 6:30 p.m. at the Hamilton County Prosecutor’s Office.
 
 

Secrets and Lies with Leah Stewart

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 1, 2015
Oscar Wilde said, “The truth is rarely pure and never simple.” The way we keep secrets and tell lies is at the heart of Leah Stewart’s latest novel, The New Neighbor.    

Robin Hood in Reverse

How universities force working-class students to pay thousands of dollars in hidden fees to athletic departments awash in red ink

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 6, 2015
An investigation of the eight largest public universities in Ohio in the Football Bowl Subdivision found that with one exception, college administrators and trustees impose hidden fees and invisible taxes on thousands of students who pay tens of millions of dollars in subsidies to keep money-losing athletic departments afloat.   
by Steven Rosen 04.20.2015 129 days ago
at 11:04 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cashin

UC's Trove of Fashion Designer Bonnie Cashin's Clothing

The Cincinnati Art  Museum's wonderful current exhibition The Total Look: The Creative Collaboration Between Rudi Gernreich, Peggy Moffitt and William Claxton mentions that one early influence on the visionary fashion designer Gernreich was Bonnie Cashin, who created quietly avant-garde women's sportswear and whose reputation has only grown since her death in 2000.It turns out that University of Cincinnati's College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning has a collection of almost 200 pieces by Cashin, a gift from Ohio State University. The pieces were among a larger donation given to OSU by Phil Sills, whose Sills & Co. produced Cashin-designed fashions from 1952 until the late 1970s. On Tuesday, DAAP students put together a one-night exhibit of a dozen pieces from its collection in the Total Look gallery, so attendees could see how her tweed with leather and suede fashions look alongside Gernreich's far more radical designs. They hold up well — the earthy colors, the bold use of plaid, the turn-lock brass closures, a jacket with a built-in coin purse in a front pocket. UC has put information about the collection online here. Meanwhile, The Total Look is on display through May 24 and deserves to be seen by all.
 
 

Free at Last, Free for Now

UC’s Ohio Innocence Project helps overturn three questionable murder convictions

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 15, 2015
Twenty years ago, Eugene Johnson, Laurese Glover and Derrick Wheatt were convicted of murder based on the testimony of a single witness. Now, thanks to nearly a decade of legal advocacy by the University of Cincinnati’s Ohio Innocence Project, they’ve been granted a new chance at justice.   

Epic Theater

CCM takes on Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill's acclaimed dark comedy

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 20, 2013
Premiered in Berlin in 1928, The Threepenny Opera is an iconic work, the creation of composer Kurt Weill and poet/dramatist Bertolt Brecht, and opens a two-weekend run at CCM as part of its Kurt Weill festival, sponsored by the Kurt Weill Foundation for Music, Inc.  

Singing The Personal And Political

A rarely performed 20th-century opera and a new work confront the clash of ideology and emotion

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 20, 2013
The personal is definitely political in two operas onstage this month in both Benjamin Britten’s Owen Wingrave, in which a young man chooses pacifism over a military career, and Fellow Travelers, based on the novel about a gay love affair during the McCarthy era.  

Attention to Detail

University of Cincinnati’s new innovation center breathes life into a 1920s former Sears store in Avondale

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 8, 2015
Imagine a classic 1920s storefront window complete with mannequins posed in their finery. Now imagine a new type of display — a space filled with buzzing drones, giant 3D printers and announcements of the latest medical breakthroughs.   

10 New Project and Policy Concepts From UrbanCincy

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 25, 2015
Urban Cincy founder Randy Simes offers 10 forward-thinking concepts to aid the region today and in the future.   

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