WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Drew Klein 11.14.2013
Posted In: Performance Art at 02:47 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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REVIEW: Performa 13 (Part Two)

CAC performance curator Drew Klein reports from arts biennial in NYC

Another Performa show, another mesmerizing experience. But we'll get to that. While my nights are reserved for performances, the days allow me an opportunity to put some miles on my MTA card, shuttling around the city to meet people in various outposts. Wednesday morning saw me grab breakfast and coffee with artist Roberto Lange, a frequent Cincinnati visitor under the guise of Helado Negro. Roberto has a long history working with Cincinnati's own Paul Coors on various projects over a number of years, and Helado Negro's packed performance at MOTR Pub closed this past edition of Midpoint. A graduate of Savannah College of Art and Design, Roberto's creative output is not limited to the standard write/record/tour process, and his vision for future projects across various mediums was exciting to talk about. Another meeting of note was a jump across Fort Greene to the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) to sit down with Joseph Melillo, executive producer of BAM overseeing artistic direction over the esteemed organization and its venues. Our chat nearly didn't happen as our CAC email had been out of service for the past 24 hours (work traveler's worst nightmare realized) and all emails to me were bouncing back. Thankfully everything got up and running just before the one window of opportunity and we were able to connect The operational realities of the performance programs at BAM and the CAC may be very different, but the conversation on our shared ideologies and the approach to the work we program was inspirational and left me feeling energized for the performance I was heading to immediately thereafter. Quickly grabbing dinner to go (a cubano sandwich, for those interested), I made my way to Chelsea and New York Live Arts, a venue dedicated to movement-based artistry that was created in 2011 by a merger of the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company and Dance Theater Workshop. Tonight's performance was the much-discussed Disabled Theater, a collaboration between French choreographer Jérôme Bel and Zurich's Theater HORA, a company of actors with learning disabilities. Debated and praised all over Europe after its premiere at dOCUMENTA (13) in Kassel, Germany, the work sees the actors' conditions and their (dis)abilities laid bare as they remain onstage for the duration of the performance as they respond, often with humor, to a series of tasks proposed by Bel.
A translator to the side of the stage began by addressing the crowd. The actors only speak Swiss German fluently, so she would be our guide. Each of the ten actors individually came out to stand in front of the audience for one minute. Even with this task, you began to learn about their conditions, their strengths and their fears. The actors ranged in age from 20 to 43. Some suffered from more severe or noticeable conditions than others. Asked to name their disability, some were fully aware of their diagnosed reality while others were limited to describing themselves as “slower than normal”.The main focus of the night was the dance routines, with the actors selecting the music, choreographing and then performing their own pieces. One by one, they would jump up when their name was called, taking the opportunity to show their moves and completely invest in the moment. With each new dance different questions would come to mind, as well as a new awareness of what expectations or preconceptions I might generally have had of artists — and people — with disabilities. Essentially, these actors were just being themselves, out in front, onstage, mostly without concern for how the audience was feeling. There were moments, however, in which we see that these actors have had experiences whereby they feel different from the so-called “normal people”. In one heartbreaking instance, a young, energetic girl with Down syndrome informed us of her disability when prompted, said “I am sorry,” and rushed back to her chair in tears, straight into the arms of a consoling friend.With Disabled Theater, Bel has made the notion of disability commonplace. The idiosyncrasies, weaknesses and natural gestures of the performers are displayed free of outside influence, allowing each audience member to accept and appreciate the artists as they would any other. An honest, highly impressive look at how we relate to a group typically viewed under a different lens.Follow citybeat.com for more Performa 13 updates from Drew Klein. Read Part One here.
 
 
by Drew Klein 11.13.2013
Posted In: Performance Art at 03:48 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
ryanmcnamara2

REVIEW: Performa 13 (Part One)

CAC performance curator Drew Klein reports from arts biennial in NYC

Arriving in New York for a work-related trip always causes my nerves to stand at full attention. I typically overcomplicate my schedule with back-to-back caffeine dates in different neighborhoods, or try and sneak in one more performance than would be wise. At the same time, I know when I'm back here that I'm going to be seeing some of the most forward-thinking live art happening in the world today, and the energy and inspiration I pull from the shows I see and the people I meet will influence my programming for seasons to come. One layover, a two-hour delay and an annoying navigation out of Newark Airport later, I'm in the city and frantically sprinting to my first pow wow of the week with artist Hisham Bharoocha. Hisham is highly regarded for his music, visual art and photography, though I'm talking with him mainly in regard to the former. A founding member of the group Black Dice, his recent experiences have seen him organize the now legendary BOADRUM experiences in which 77 and, later, 88 drummers played the same number of kits on the dates 07/07/07 and 08/08/08, respectively, as well as other projects utilizing the two main parts of his live creative output — voice and percussion. Hisham owns a unique ability to take a live concept and build it into something visceral yet magical, and I was glad to find that I enjoyed him as a human being as well. I hate bad coffee dates. However, the main reason for being in New York this time of year is Performa 13, the performance art biennial hosted at various venues around the city that runs for 24 days in November. Started in 2005 by art historian RoseLee Goldberg (she has written a book on performance art and is now revered as a key figure in that world), Performa presents some of today's most compelling performance art works and, more famously, commissions new work from reputable artists who work across various mediums — artists ranging from Carlos Amorales to Japanther to Ragnar Kjartansson. Earlier performances this month have featured Dean Spunt of No Age, a Contemporary Arts Center performer this past September, and C. Spencer Yeh, the longtime Cincinnati resident and noise art maestro whose visual art exhibition Standard Definition opened at the CAC in October 2009. My experience two years ago at Performa 11 introduced me to a rough working of Jace Clayton's Julius Eastman Memorial Dinner, and that serendipitous event lead to the project being further developed and realized before its world premiere as a production-in-full in our performance program this past April. The first experience I had with Performa 13 will be hard to beat, I imagine. Arriving at the quaint Connelly Theater Ryan McNamara's MEƎM: A Story Ballet About The Internet, the attendants were instructed to check all coats and bags at the entrance before entering what served as a sort of waiting room of art school students, seasoned performance art patrons and those seeking something out of the ordinary. The room resembled a high school cafeteria in look and ambiance, filled with social chatter between friends and colleagues. As I paid little attention to the conversations, I went into the performance completely unaware of what would happen. 
After being lead into an auditorium with standard seating facing an elevated stage, the program began with three male dancers contorting their bodies slowly and precisely to a modern dance Pop soundtrack. Not long into the routine it became clear that “something” was happening directly behind the audience. Too unbothered to turn around and take my attention from the stage, I heard small laughs and continued to feel like the program was turning into something entirely new. As the energy picked up around me, I finally glanced back and for the first time noticed that nearly all of the rows behind me were no longer there, and that two other dancers had set up shop in the back corners of the room and portions of the audience were now seated, in the same chairs, facing those performances. At the same time, two audience members appeared in their chairs moving up the ramps at the sides of the stage, being pulled by two production team members. Before too long, my own chair was lifted up and I was swiftly carted, passing through one room with three leotard-adorned dancers moving to strobe-affected disco before being delivered to a room where two women in matching outfits performed a laconic dance to a playlist of suspenseful film score pieces. This routine continued for an hour, with roughly 10 minutes spent at each location. At the end, after we were all put back in what we thought were our resting positions, there was still time for one final, beautiful, balletic piece. Then our chairs were forcefully reconfigured, and our expectations were once again turned upside down. The music was mostly modern, referencing pop culture, and the dance routines were pulled (stolen) from popular internet videos. The anxiety over being completely unable to control your own attention, while still desperately attempting to, was incredibly effective in highlighting the performance's entire concept of questioning the very possibility of a singular “experience” today. There were roughly 10-12 possible positions, and each person probably experienced no more than six of those. We all wanted to catch more of what was happening all around, but often ignored what was right in front us. In the end, nobody seemed to leave feeling like they didn't get to experience it all.Follow citybeat.com for more Performa 13 updates from Drew Klein.
 
 
by Mike Breen 06.24.2013
Posted In: Local Music, Live Music, Music News at 12:35 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Art/Music Collide Tonight at CAC's 'Scroll Improvisation'

Musician Joe Hedges teams with artist Jiemei Lin for unique performance/music/art piece

Singer/songwriter/musician Joe Hedges — known for work with his band July for Kings, as well as some great solo ventures — is collaborating with visual artist Jiemei Lin tonight at downtown’s Contemporary Arts Center as part of the museum’s series, "The Living Room." (Hedges is also a visual artist, creating paintings, web art and installations.)  The twosome’s project, “Scroll Improvisation,” features Hedges creating music on the fly with a mix of live and recorded material, while Lin crafts a large “scroll drawing” on the floor. According to the press release, “The piece will investigate the function and history of narrative Chinese scrolls in a contemporary fashion while exploring the idea of the western living room as a venue for improvisational ambient and Folk music.” (Lin is a native of China.) More from the CAC: "In the west, the living room has long been a venue for intimate performances of music for family and friends using inexpensive hand-held instruments. Traditional Chinese living rooms contain a scroll featuring calligraphy and painting. Both western acoustic music and eastern paper scrolls tell stories, reinforce family identities and values. Scroll Improvisation investigates the relationship of music and art, narrative quality of Chinese scrolls, notation and recording, cultural identity and control." Monday’s special performance begins at 8 p.m. and is free and open to the public. For more information, visit contemporaryartscenter.org.
 
 

Holiday Issue 2012

0 Comments · Tuesday, November 20, 2012
When we enter the grown-up world, there are quite a few aspects of life that lose a great bit of childlike mystique: visits to the dentist, overalls, Hostess products and, perhaps most glaringly, the holiday season.   

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