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by German Lopez 11.04.2013
Posted In: News, Media at 01:08 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
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'Enquirer' Circulation Declines Again

Numbers down more than 10 percent over the past year

Many of Ohio’s major newspapers, including The Cincinnati Enquirer, lost thousands of readers in the past year, but some managed to beat trends and gain in certain categories, according to a circulation audit from the Alliance for Audited Media. The audit found The Enquirer’s average daily circulation, which excludes Saturday and Sunday, down to 117,754 from 132,076 between September 2012 and September 2013. Sunday circulation fell to 235,515 from 262,876. The numbers represent a 10.8 percent decline in average daily circulation and 10.4 percent on Sundays.The Akron Beacon Journal and Youngstown Vindicator also saw negative trends, with average daily and Sunday circulation dropping. Cleveland’s The Plain Dealer lost some of its Sunday circulation, but comparable statistics weren’t available for average daily circulation because the newspaper transitioned from daily delivery to three-times-a-week delivery earlier in the year. But The Toledo Blade and Dayton Daily News actually increased their average daily and Sunday circulation. The Columbus Dispatch also upped its average daily circulation, but Sunday circulation fell.For newspapers, dropping circulation coincides with more readers getting their news from the Internet and alternative sources over the past few years. The alternatives have cost newspapers around the country readers and advertising revenue, and many have responded with cutbacks in staff and overall news coverage.  In August, The Enquirer moved and laid off staff from its Kentucky and West Chester offices. The layoffs came as parent company Gannett dismissed more than 400 workers around the country, according to estimates from Gannett Blog.Other media outlets appear to be taking advantage of the new vacancy. The Business Courier reported on Monday that Cox Media’s Journal-News is increasing its presence in Butler and Warren counties to compete with The Enquirer. The move follows Cox Media’s decision to merge its Hamilton and Middletown newspapers into a single entity that covers both cities and counties.
 
 

Buy an Ad, Save a Newspaper

0 Comments · Tuesday, February 3, 2009
Ads determine the news hole in a ratio meant to show a profit; the news hole includes everything not an ad: photos, illustrations, headlines, comics, recipes, weather map, etc. Editors get page layouts with the ads blocked in. They work around them.   

Special Skills Required for Early Morning Newscasts

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 7, 2009
Monday through Friday, WVXU News Director Maryanne Zeleznik cheerily announces it's a minute before 5 a.m. and leads into NPR's 'Morning Edition' and local programming. No spouse or roommate could be so chipper, and she doesn't flag audibly during the next five hours. It's not the perkiness of an ingenue but the confident sound of a village Wise Woman who enjoys her special knowledge and role.  

Is Detroit's Media Gamble the Future of Newspapers?

0 Comments · Friday, December 26, 2008
By limiting home delivery to days that most appeal to advertisers (Thursday, Friday and Sunday) while reducing production and delivery costs on four days, The Detroit Free Times and Detroit News can save a lot of money and some journalists' jobs.   

Paper Cuts

As newspaper industry bleeds, Enquirer tries to hold on

5 Comments · Wednesday, December 10, 2008
Prompted by the troubled U.S. economy, Greater Cincinnati's only remaining daily newspaper laid off several employees Dec. 2 and 3 under strict orders from its owner, Gannett Co. Although the number of layoffs wasn't disclosed, at least 30 people (including 13 in the newsroom) were let go, sources say. Further, The Enquirer's 'newshole' will be reduced by six pages on Sundays and a total of 30 pages across the other weekdays beginning the week of Dec. 28, says Editor Tom Callinan.   

Enquirer and Daily Papers Down but Not Out

2 Comments · Wednesday, December 10, 2008
Enquirer Editor Tom Callinan is a veteran print journalist trying to reconfigure his 'paper' and staff under awful conditions in the Internet Age. Success will include keeping older, affluent readers and attracting younger, increasingly affluent readers. He doesn't need my advice, and I'm glad I'm not in his position.  

All Aboard ... or End of the Line?

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 10, 2008
As the financial world churns and tosses, you might hear someone offer a warning against businesses becoming too complacent. "What the railroads failed to understand," this person will say, "is that they weren't in the railroad business." The moral: The railroad companies mistook their medium (trains) for their core product (transportation). The newspaper business is now being put through the railroad analogy grinder, and the comparisons are apt.   

Newspapers Shrink Away from the AP and International News

1 Comment · Friday, October 31, 2008
Spreading cancellations of Associated Press memberships could leave our premier international news service unable to maintain its breadth and quality. AP is the major source of international news in our daily papers and any diminution will degrade our already dismal understanding of events beyond our borders. About 100 papers gave two-year cancellation notices to the AP in recent weeks; whether they're negotiating ploys in a fee dispute or rethinking of news priorities is unclear.  

Enquirer Supports Less Privacy?

0 Comments · Monday, July 7, 2008
Enquirer nuttiness is making me think I'm a conservative. An editorial blandly accepts CCTV -- not Phil Burress' illiberal cult -- but 120 Closed Circuit TV cameras to police our streets.  

Getting to the 'Real Truth'

0 Comments · Sunday, August 10, 2008
A tenet of ethical reporting is to verify information not personally known to the reporter. That's true even if -- especially if -- a public official, a public figure or a syndicated columnist makes a claim of public concern.  

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