WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Samantha Gellin 02.26.2015 4 days ago
Posted In: Commentary at 09:40 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
from the copy editor

From the Copy Desk

In case you need a dictionary with the Feb. 25 issue of CityBeat

Good morning readers. I hope you're all surviving the bleak, cold, dark days of February better than I am. I can't stop myself from browsing the "Getaways" section of Groupon — five night, all-inclusive stay in Punta Cana? Sign me up! I'll go anywhere the sun is shining and the heat is brimming. Someday, right? For now, though, I've got my coffee and a list of Words Nobody Uses or Knows from this week's issue. Let's get started. My favorite word of the issue (or phrase, really) is in toto. It's found in Kathy Y. Wilson's editorial on the Oscars, a night, as Neil Patrick Harris so accurately said, where "we celebrate Hollywood’s best and whitest, sorry… brightest."In toto: a Latin phrase meaning in the whole; as a whole (adv.)In the issue: "Secondly, the voter finessed the fact that most members are white men — which is, in fact, the larger problem plaguing Hollywood in toto and it is the direct genealogical link to the white-out of this year’s Oscars and what’s fraught past racist Oscar races."Though whenever I say in toto, I can't help but think of Toto, Dorthory's dog in Wizard of Oz. Anyway, next up is the French word outré, pronounced OO-TREY.  (French words are the best, aren't they?) outré: highly unconventional; eccentric or bizarre (adj.)In this issue: "Later, during an interview for this story, Katkin explained his affinity for that band, which released several outré albums in the late 1980s and early 1990s."Environs, another word of French origin, caught my eye too.environs: a surrounding area, especially of a city; surroundings; environment (plural n.)My mind is a little blown by this one. It's essentially just another word for environment and yet I've never heard of it. In this issue: "It’s bitter wisdom that easily translates to certain local music environs where bands are neither nurtured nor respected."The last word I have jotted down is rubes, but I can't seem to find it anywhere in the issue. It may have been edited out (or else I'm reading things that aren't there). I'm going to include it anyway. The more you know, the more you grow, right?I love this word because Rubes is one of the many, MANY nicknames I have for my cat Ruby. She is also sometimes called Ruben, Princess Pastry Puff, Doot, Street Rat ... OK I'll stop there. rubes: an unsophisticated country person; nickname of Reuben (n.)
 
 
by Samantha Gellin 02.13.2015 17 days ago
Posted In: Commentary at 11:22 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
from the copy editor

From the Copy Desk

In case you need a dictionary with the Feb. 11 issue of CityBeat

Good morning readers! I'm a day late, but let's review the Words Nobody Uses or Knows in this week's issue — which, by the way, has to be one of my favorites to date. It's The Beer Issue, if you haven't already noticed, and we did so much reporting on local beer and Beer Week festivities that we created an entirely new webpage for it. It's a great place to start if you're looking for a calendar of events, want to learn more about Cincinnati's rich brewing history or what today's local breweries are all about. But let's get started. Two high-brow words that caught my eye are in Steven Rosen's piece on the Cincinnati Art Museum's forgotten Japanese art collection. The first is cloisonné, a French word pronounced KLOIS-ZE-NAY. (I found the actual phonetic spelling of it, klȯi-zə-ˈnā, a bit confusing.)cloisonné: of, relating to, or being a style of enamel decoration in which the enamel is applied and fired in raised cells (as of soldered wires) on a usually metal background (n.)Here's an example of a beauteous Chinese cloisonné incense burner, via the Google:In the issue: "Those objects include paintings, screens, prints, ceramics, lacquer and metal wares, ivory carvings, arms and armor, cloisonné, dolls, masks, costumes and textiles."The next word is accessioned. It looks like a word I ought to know, like an SAT word, but nope.accession: to record the addition of (a new item) to a library, museum, or other collection (v.)In this issue: “I didn’t even know we had a Japanese art collection because most of it had never been published or displayed or organized, and some were not even accessioned,” she says.Tippling, another obscure word, is found in Garin Pirnia's piece on lesser-known taprooms and breweries that are brand-spanking new or slated to open in the Tristate area in the next few months.tipple: to drink (alcoholic liquor) or engage in such drinking, especially habitually or to excess (v.)What a great word. I should start using that all of the time and really confuse people. "Hey! I'm out tippling!"In this issue: "Needless to say, now would not be a good time to curtail your tippling."  Moving on. Perhaps my favorite word of the entire issue is found in Worst Week Ever: hoosegow. It's bizarre and antiquated and contains no hint whatsoever of its meaning.hoosegow: slang for jail (n.) Fun fact: According to thefreedictionary.com, the term was born from a mixture of Spanish and English spoken in the Western part of the United States at the beginning of the 20th century. In other words, it's Old West slang. It comes from the Spanish word juzgado, meaning "court of justice, tribunal." If that's confusing, here's an explanation:"In many varieties of Spanish, the ending ado is usually pronounced as ao in everybody speech, with no d at all or only a very lightly articulated one. The spelling hoosegow thus is a pretty good representation of the American Spanish pronunciation of the word juzgado as it might sound to the ears of an English-speaking American, even though hoosegow looks nothing like the actual written form of juzgado."In this issue: "Remus’s life story is a fascinating and complicated one, which culminated in him killing his wife in Eden Park for betraying him while he was in the hoosegow."Have a great weekend, readers!
 
 
by Samantha Gellin 02.05.2015 25 days ago
Posted In: Commentary at 09:41 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
from the copy editor

From the Copy Desk

In case you need a dictionary with the Feb. 4 issue of CityBeat

Good morning readers! Let's get right to it: I rounded up four words in this week's issue of Words Nobody Uses or Knows.  (Side Note: If you haven't already, check out this year's Love List. We've profiled 12 of Cincinnati's hottest locals, and each one offers bits of wisdom on love, work and passion, just in time for Valentine's Day.)But moving on. My favorite word of the issue is vittles, found in Garin Pirnia's review of Marid Gras on Madison, a new Creole cafe in East Walnut Hills.  vittles: food; edible provisions (n.)  The singular version of vittles, vittle, is archaic, and for whatever reason it's no longer used in today's vernacular. In fact, Microsoft Word doesn't even recognize vittle as a real word unless you add an S to it.In the issue: "In January, Latoya “Toya” Foster of New Orleans to Go food truck fame opened a brick-and-mortar version of her Cajun/Creole vittles called Mardi Gras on Madison in East Walnut Hills."The next two words, halcyon and zelig, are found in this week's Sound Advice on Dave Mason, a dude in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame that I've never heard of. (But, let's be real, I've never heard of anybody in Sound Advice. I am not anyone's version of cool.)Halcyon can be used as an adjective or a noun and it has two different (though similar) meanings.halcyon: an idealized, idyllic or peaceful time (adj.) OR a legendary bird, identified with the kingfisher, which is supposed to have a peaceful, calming influence on the sea at the time of the winter solstice (n.)  If you type halcyon into Google Images, as I just did, you'll not only get a picture of a naked woman on chaise lounge (?) but this: An awesome sketch of the halcyon, the legendary ostrich/hawk/dinosaur hybrid that controls the seas.In this issue: "Life is a circle and it’s come back around full force for Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Dave Mason, who began his legendary career nearly 50 years ago as co-founder of Traffic and now revisits those halcyon days with his latest touring concept/project, Traffic Jam. "The second word, zelig, is an odd one. Sounds very star-trek, or something. zelig: One who unconsciously mimics the traits or appearances of those with whom he or she associates. In this issue: "In the latter part of the ’60s and the dawn of the ’70s, Mason was like Rock’s Zelig, constantly finding himself at historical crossroads."Alright, last word that Nobody Uses or Knows is filchers, found (where else?) in Kathy Y. Wilson's editorial on how those of us silly enough to pursue journalism as a career are all poor, so very poor.  But rich in spirit and lax work schedules?filchers: one who filches; a thief (n.)In this issue: "My 2014 1099s are like that photo album your mom’s been keeping from the photo filchers in the family; she has been saving it to share with just you."Enjoy the weekend readers!
 
 
by Samantha Gellin 01.15.2015 46 days ago
Posted In: Commentary at 10:38 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
from the copy editor

From the Copy Desk

Good late morning readers! Let's jump right into Words Nobody Uses or Knows in this week's issue. (But first, you know I have to say it: Pick up a copy! We feature Cincinnati's Best New Bands of 2015. It's a great way to discover new groups and pretend that you're hip.)Alright, best word of the issue is zeitgeist, found in Reyan Ali's piece on Motion City Soundtrack. It's a word that reminds me of Rhinegeist brewery, in Over-the-Rhine.zeitgeist: the spirit of the time; the taste and outlook characteristic of a period or generation (n.)OH MAN, connection.  Rhinegeist: probably derived from the word zeitgeist. According to the Rhinegeist webpage, the name translates to "ghost of the Rhine". (So THAT'S why their logo is a skull.)  I've never understood the meaning of their funky name or logo until now. I'm really not with it, am I.In this issue: "It’s a short but telling story that isn’t so much a criticism of Motion City as it is a reflection on contemporary culture — lives have been lived, fans have moved on from onetime passions (or at least not kept up their sites) and certain scenes don’t stimulate the zeitgeist as they once did."Moving on. Next best word is shoehorning, found in Sound Advice. (It's always the music writers, isn't it?) OK, this may be an obvious word, but honestly, I've never heard of it.shoehorn: to force or squeeze into a narrow space (v.); an implement of metal, horn, plastic, etc. with a troughlike blade, inserted at the back of a shoe to aid in slipping the heel in (n.)In this issue, used as a verb: "Adam Schatz and his merry band of Rock provocateurs kick up a sonic maelstrom that operates under the broad umbrella of Art Rock, with subtle hints of Afrobeat, Funk, Jazz, Reggae, Doo Wop, New Wave and anything else the musicians feel like shoehorning into the proceedings as long as it effectively serves the song at hand."I've never used a shorhorn to put on shoes in my life. If you've gotten to that point, put the shoes down. They're too uncomfortable.Last word is amalgam, found in Brian Baker's piece on Punk/Pop trio Leggy. It's a word I probably learned many moons ago, in a high school chemistry class, but have since forgotten. amlgam: a combination or mixture; blend; any alloy of mercury with another metal or other metals: silver amalgam is used as a dental filling (n.)In this issue: "Leggy’s sound — as evidenced in its live presentation, on Cavity Castle, its digital/physical cassette release, and on its latest digital track, “Grrls Like Us” — is an amalgam of Allaer’s seminal love of the Vines’/Strokes’ simple power chord/garage reverb equation, Bladh and Allaer’s early affection for Joanna Newsom’s Avant Psych Folk and their mutual love of Lana Del Rey and St. Vincent."  Whew. If you're like me and know nothing about local music (or, just, music in general), that sentence makes little to no sense. Enjoy the weekend, readers!
 
 
by Samantha Gellin 01.08.2015 53 days ago
Posted In: Commentary at 11:33 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
from the copy editor

From the Copy Desk

In case you need a dictionary with the Jan. 7 issue of CityBeat

Afternoon, readers! So, there weren't many Words Nobody Uses or Knows in this week's issue. Our writers must not have been feeling so pretentious. Honestly, I found two, and one word was defined by the author IN the article. But it's just too great of a word to pass up in, so I'm going to expand upon it a bit in our vocab lesson.Flibbertigibbet. Yes, this is a real word; it even has its own Wikipedia page. It's found in the headline and in the text of this week's Spill It.flibbertigibbet (pronounced flibber-TEE-gibbit): a silly, scatterbrained, or garrulous person (n.)It's a Middle English word, meaning it's from the dialect of the Middle Ages, the 12th to 15th century. Today it's mostly used as a slang term in Yorkshire. (The English use all sorts of fabulous words, don't they?)Fun flibbertigibbet facts, according to the Google: The word has also been historically used as a name for a devil, spirit or fiend. In the book Charlotte's Web, the Goose says, "I am no Flibberty-ibberty-gibbet." Flibbertigibbet is also is the password used in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban to access Gryffindor's dormitory.In this issue: "Late last year, veteran multi-instrumentalist/singer/songwriter Chris Arduser released the latest addition to his stellar discography, a new solo album titled Flibbertigibbet (yes, it’s a real word, meaning 'a flighty or excessively talkative person')."OK, the next and last word on my list is churlish. Again, this is a word I see a lot, but I don't actually know what it means. It's found in TT Stern-Enzi's piece: "The Future Is Now: A Sneak Peek at the Year".churlish: a rude, selfish or mean person (n.); boorish or vulgar (adj.)In this issue: "It would be churlish to focus on their misfires (Van Sant’s shot-for-shot remake of Hitchcock’s Psycho and Malick’s far-too-interior fever dream To the Wonder), even when such efforts, while frustrating, prove to be more inspired and riskier bets than the working hacks could ever imagine in a thousand years with all the riches of the world at their disposal."That's all I've got, readers. Try and stay warm this weekend (although when it's 0 degrees out, literally ZERO, this may be futile).
 
 

Edit Out the Garbage

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 12, 2009
I was deeply disappointed and, frankly, shocked by the blatant racism displayed by Charlie Gibson in his recent Living Out Loud column “Garbage Watch” (issue of July 22). While I applaud the author for his efforts in educating your readers on the benefits of composting, I doubt whether it was necessary or even beneficial to impugn another nation, its language and its culture to make his point.   

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