WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by German Lopez 02.27.2014 56 days ago
Posted In: News, Parking, History, Mayor, City Council, city manager at 09:51 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
news parking

Morning News and Stuff

Council backs parking plan, strong mayor gains support, museum keeps Dr. Seuss cartoons

City Council yesterday expressed support for a barebones parking plan that would upgrade all meters to accept credit card payments and increase enforcement around the city, which should boost annual revenues. The plan does not increase rates or hours at meters, as Mayor John Cranley originally called for. It also doesn’t allow people to pay for parking meters through smartphones. The plan ultimately means death for the parking privatization plan, which faced widespread criticism after the previous city administration and council passed it as a means to jumpstart new investments and help fix the city’s operating budget and pension system.Councilman Christopher Smitherman plans to pursue changes to the city’s political structure to give more power to the mayor and less to the city manager. Smitherman says the current system is broken because it doesn’t clearly define the role of the mayor. Under Smitherman’s system, the mayor would run the city and hire department heads; the city manager, who currently runs the city and handles hiring, would primarily preside over budget issues; and City Council would pass legislation and act as a check to the mayor. Smitherman aims to put the plan to voters this November.Commentary: “WCPO’s Sloppy Streetcar Reporting Misses Real Concerns.”The Cincinnati Art Museum maintains five political cartoons from the famed Dr. Seuss (Theodore Seuss Geisel), but none are currently on public display. The cartoons call back to the history before World War II, when most of the world played ignorant to the horrors of the Holocaust and Americans had yet to enter the war. Dr. Seuss loathed the villains on the world stage, and his cartoons promoted a message of interventionism that would eventually lead him to join the Army to help in the fight against the Axis powers. When he returned home, he would write the famous stories and books he’s now so well known for.Mayor Cranley and some council members appear reluctant to accept a routine grant application that would allow the Cincinnati Health Department to open two more clinics because of the potential effect the clinics could have on the city’s budget. Cranley and other council members also seem concerned that the Health Department played a role in the recent closing of Neighborhood Health Care, which shut down four clinics and three school-based programs after it lost federal funding.Ohio legislators approved a bill that forces absentee voters to submit more information and reduces the amount of time provisional voters have to confirm their identities from 10 days to one week. For Democrats, the bill adds to previous concerns that Republicans are attempting to suppress voters. The bill now goes to Gov. John Kasich, a Republican who’s expected to sign the measure into law.The Ohio legislature continues wrangling over how to give schools more snow days.More than 175,000 claims have been filed over winter damage, potentially making this winter one of the costliest in decades.Robot suits could make mixed martial arts blood-free.Follow CityBeat on Twitter:• Main: @CityBeatCincy • News: @CityBeat_News • Music: @CityBeatMusic • German Lopez: @germanrlopezGot any news tips? Email them to glopez@citybeat.com.
 
 

Serious Seuss

Cincinnati Art Museum maintains five Dr. Seuss editorial cartoons taking aim at villains on the world stage

1 Comment · Wednesday, February 26, 2014
The Seuss is not loose at the Cincinnati Art Museum, which has a stash of the good doctor’s political cartoons filed away and unavailable for public viewing in its archives.  

Sharing Halloween's Roots with Children

The holiday's history runs deeper than just candy and creepy masks

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 23, 2013
The business of getting back to the roots of Halloween can be a fun, creative time for families to spend together, too. Here are a few ideas to get you going that don’t involve candy or store-bought plastic masks.   

Volcanic Disruption

A Day in Pompeii is a jarring look at a 2,000-year-old catastrophe

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 13, 2012
Pompeii is the disaster-grabber of all time. How old were you when that terrible story first drew you in? I was 8, I think, and Pompeii still grips my imagination. For all of us who can’t shake this fascination, A Day in Pompeii, now at Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal, is a must.  

A Brief History of the Future (Review)

Jacques Attali - Arcade Publishing

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 22, 2009
The good news about Jacques Attali’s latest literary work is that in painting a startling and timely picture of humanity’s downward spiral, the author does not mince words or cop to his own smarts — that’s no small feat for a world-renowned economist, one that is especially impressive considering his counterparts’ failure to deliver even the broadest short-term fiscal projections without confounding CNN viewers on a nightly basis.   

The General James Taylor Mansion

1 Comment · Wednesday, December 17, 2008
There are few things that get me in the Christmas spirit like an old historic building or city block decked out in its holiday fanciest. There’s just something about the twinkling lights at dusk and miles of pine roping neatly adorning some fabulous architecture that ignites the sentimental holiday sap in me.  

East Meets West Coast

East Meets West Coast Los Angeles-based author Lisa See uses her past to uncover hidden history

1 Comment · Tuesday, September 23, 2008
the Year, the Chinese American History Makers award, but the one that meant the most to me, that told me I had really been accepted, was I got to be a judge for the Miss Chinatown pageant.” In college she was a Modern Greek Studies major, which she says taught her the “pleasures and surprises” of research.   

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