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Consensus Building

Ohio's LGBT groups disagree on timing of same-sex marriage legalization as polls show increasing support

1 Comment · Tuesday, December 31, 2013
Ohio’s leading LGBT groups continue to disagree whether 2014 or 2016 is the right year to place same-sex marriage legalization on the ballot.  
by German Lopez 10.31.2013
Posted In: News, LGBT, Taxes at 11:19 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
evolution of equality

Ohio Gay Couples Can Now Jointly File for Federal Taxes

LGBT groups call for marriage equality to bring standard to state and local taxes

The Ohio Department of Taxation this week released separate tax forms that will allow gay couples who live in the state but got married in another state to jointly file for taxes at the federal level. But because of Ohio’s constitutional ban on same-sex marriage, same-sex couples won’t be able to jointly file for taxes at the state or local level. Although the move is being received as a step forward for Ohio’s gay couples, some LGBT groups say the discrepancy between different levels of government shows the need to push for marriage equality in Ohio. Why Marriage Matters Ohio, which is trying to educate Ohioans on the benefits of same-sex marriage, pointed out the discrepancy in an emailed statement on Wednesday. “This is why marriage equality matters in Ohio. This is why we’re working to build support for affording all Ohio families the protections and responsibilities that only marriage offers,” wrote Elyzabeth Holdford, executive director of Equality Ohio and board chair of Why Marriage Matters Ohio. FreedomOhio, which is attempting to get same-sex marriage on the November 2014 ballot, also criticized the discrepancy on Thursday. “While many will appreciate the extra tax benefits, this separate and unequal treatment of families is unfair, unequal and is not the treatment we seek,” said Ian James, co-founder of FreedomOhio, in a statement. “FreedomOhio is committed to bringing equal rights to all Ohioans.” Beyond the issue of equal rights, allowing same-sex marriages in Ohio could generate economic activity. A study conducted by Bill LaFayette, founder of Regionomics, LLC, found marriage equality could produce $100-$126 million in economic growth within three years in the state and $8.2 million in the same time span in Hamilton County. The new tax form for same-sex couples can be found here.
 
 

Working for Equality

Employers in most of Ohio can currently fire workers for their sexual orientation and gender identity, but a new bill could stop it

1 Comment · Wednesday, September 11, 2013
It’s legal in most of Ohio for someone to be fired over his or her sexual orientation and gender identity, but a new bill could ban the practice.  
by German Lopez 09.09.2013
Posted In: News, LGBT at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
evolution of equality

Groups Come Together to Persuade Public on Gay Marriage

LGBT groups, civil libertarians and legislators involved in “big marriage push”

LGBT groups, civil libertarians and legislators are coming together in Cincinnati, Cleveland and Columbus today to announce Why Marriage Matters Ohio, a new statewide effort to educate and persuade Ohioans to support legalizing same-sex marriage. Evan Wolfson, founder and president of Freedom to Marry, explained the campaign’s purpose in a statement: “Why Marriage Matters Ohio aims to encourage neighbor-to-neighbor conversations across the state, inviting people to talk about their own individual journeys toward support of the freedom to marry and their values of respect for commitment and treating others as we’d all want to be treated. Personal stories are the best conversation starter — and conversation is the best way to help people understand that all loving and committed couples in Ohio, gay and non-gay alike, should be able to share in the freedom to marry and the security and meaning marriage brings.” The campaign involves the American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio, Equality Ohio, Freedom to Marry and the Human Rights Campaign. The efforts have been endorsed by faith and business community leaders, according to the groups. “Marriage is the ultimate recognition of loving relationships,” State Rep. Denise Driehaus, a Cincinnati Democrat, said in a statement. “It's time for Ohio to get down to business and start respecting all marriages.” In Cincinnati, Driehaus is announcing the campaign with Jim Obergefell, a Cincinnati resident who’s having his marriage recognized on his spouse’s death certificate as a result of a court order in favor of marriage equality. When issuing that court order, U.S. District Judge Timothy Black cited a U.S. Supreme Court ruling earlier in the year that deemed the federal government’s anti-gay marriage laws unconstitutional. Public officials and supporters are lining up in two other Ohio cities to support the campaign: U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown is speaking in Cleveland, and Elyzabeth Holford, executive director of Equality Ohio, is making the announcement in Columbus. According to a statement issued by the campaign, the effort is partly in response to recent public polling. The 2013 Ohio Values Survey from the Public Religion Research Institute found Ohioans evenly divided on same-sex marriage: 47 percent supported it and 47 opposed it. But 51 percent said they oppose amending the state constitution to legalize marriage equality. Still, the survey findings went against previous polls from The Washington Post and Quinnipiac University, which found a plurality of Ohioans now support allowing same-sex marriages in the state. Beyond allowing gay couples to share in the same rights as straight couples, same-sex marriages could also boost Ohio’s economic and job growth. A previous study from Bill LaFayette, founder of Regionomics, LLC, found that Ohio’s gross domestic product, which measures economic worth, would go up by $100-$126 million within three years of same-sex marriage legalization and sustain 740 to 930 jobs within the first year of legalization, 250 to 310 jobs within the second year and 170 to 210 jobs within the third year. The education push comes in time for a broader effort to legalize same-sex marriage. FreedomOhio originally planned to get the issue on the ballot this year, but it delayed the initiative for the 2014 ballot.
 
 
by German Lopez 09.04.2013
Posted In: News, LGBT at 10:18 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
evolution of equality

Ohioans Support Job Protections for Gays and Lesbians

Most Ohioans mistakenly think laws already exist to protect employment equality

Ohio voters overwhelmingly support laws that would protect gays and lesbians from job discrimination, but even more Ohioans mistakenly think such laws are already in place, according to the 2013 Ohio Values Survey from the Public Religion Research Institute. The poll found 68 percent of Ohio voters favor laws that protect gays and lesbians in the workplace. Only 25 percent of respondents voiced opposition. But about 84 percent incorrectly think legal protections already exist at the state level and 80 percent mistakenly assumed such laws exist at the federal level. Similarly, around four in five people wrongly think it’s already illegal to refuse to rent a home or do business with someone because of sexual orientation and gender identity. While employment discrimination isn’t tolerated, the poll found Ohioans are evenly divided on whether same-sex marriage should be legal (47 percent to 47 percent) and a slim majority said the state constitution shouldn’t be amended to allow gays and lesbians to marry (51 percent to 45 percent). The poll was conducted through telephone interviews between Aug. 8 and Aug. 15, sampling 883 registered voters in Ohio with a margin of error of 3.9 percent. The results provide some context for why Ohio’s LGBT groups are currently at odds over whether they should pursue marriage equality. FreedomOhio is aiming to put the issue on the ballot in 2014, but Equality Ohio says employment protections are more politically realistic and should take precedence. Still, there has been some momentum in favor of marriage equality in the past couple years. A Quinnipiac University poll released on April 19 found 48 percent of Ohio voters support gay marriage and 44 percent oppose it, with a 2.9 percent margin of error. That was a switch from a Dec. 12 poll, which found 47 percent of Ohio voters were against same-sex marriage and 45 percent favored it. FreedomOhio is currently gathering petition signatures to put same-sex marriage on the ballot. The group was originally aiming to put the issue to a vote in 2013, but it ultimately delayed its efforts by one year.
 
 

The Evolution of Equality

Are Ohioans ready to recognize my gay marriage?

4 Comments · Wednesday, November 28, 2012
In 2004, while most Democrats around me reeled from the defeat of John Kerry, I had other post-election problems: Gay marriage and same-sex civil unions had been officially banned in Ohio. I was devastated. I was 14 back then. If I had been 14 in 2013, it’s increasingly looking like my story of that age would have been very different.  

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