WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Robot Rock

A modernized Metrobot will be returning to the CAC

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 20, 2014
Soon, you may hear a pronounced jingle whenever Contemporary Arts Center employees walk around their building. If so, it’s because they will be carrying change — lots of it — so art lovers can use the new payphone on the gloriously resurrected Metrobot.   

Wondering About ‘Buildering’ and Its Real-World Relevance

0 Comments · Tuesday, July 15, 2014
I’ve had a difficult time trying to write about Buildering: Misbehaving the City, the first show at Contemporary Arts Center that its curator, Steven Matijcio, has put together since arriving here last year from North Carolina. And now it is nearing its end — it closes Aug. 18.  

CAC’s Performance Series Moves Way Outside the Box

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 2, 2014
Not content to merely think outside the box with its Performance Series, the Contemporary Arts Center plans to physically travel outside the box — the confines of its Black Box Theatre, that is — for several of its 2014-15 programs.  
by Jac Kern 06.18.2014 75 days ago
Posted In: Arts community, Visual Art at 11:32 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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CAC Offers Extended Thursday Hours for Summer

Night Museum runs 5-9 p.m. Thursdays through Aug. 7

Fresh off its 2014-2015 season announcement, Downtown’s Contemporary Arts Center adds a new promotion to its calendar of exhibits, performances and special events. Night Museum gives visitors a chance to check out the CAC during evening hours every Thursday. From 5-9 p.m., guests can view the latest exhibit, shop the CAC Store, enjoy a cash bar and mingle with other art appreciators. Admission is $7.50; $5.50 for seniors, students and educators; and free for children under 5 and all members. Paid visitors can park for free Thursdays in July at the Central Parking Garage (36 E. Seventh Street).This week's Night Museum coincides with a special event from One Night One Craft, the CAC's DIY workshop series. Chef Trinidad Mac-Auliffe of Raw Intervention will demonstrate cool recipes — literally — highlighting dishes prepared without heat. Munch on raw creations, then try making some of your own fro 6-8 p.m. One Night One Craft continues Mondays through July. The CAC is typically open until 6 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. The museum is closed on Tuesdays and offers free admission from 5-9 p.m. Mondays. Find more info here.
 
 
by Steven Rosen 06.04.2014 89 days ago
Posted In: Visual Art at 08:58 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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CAC Announces 2014-15 Season

Schedule includes upcoming visual arts exhibition season and performances

The Contemporary Arts Center today announced its upcoming visual arts exhibition season, as well as several events in its performance schedule. Here is the release, edited for length: Visual Arts Exhibition Season: Memory Palace (Sept. 12, 2014-Feb.16, 2015)Curated by Steven MatijcioOn the occasion of the CAC's 75th anniversary, this exhibition will present memory as soft, malleable clay. Rather than renewing the supposed fixity of facts, Memory Palace will revel in remembering as a creative act: highlighting the way our recollections shift actual histories into imperfect, obstructed, quintessentially human legacies.Confirmed artists for this landmark exhibition include Louise Bourgeois, Spencer Finch, Mike Kelley, William Kentridge, Guillermo Kuitca, Jun Nguyen- Hatsushiba, Hans Op de Beeck, Dennis Oppenheim, Katrin Sigurdardottir and others to be announced. The CAC's extended community will also contribute to this project as we gather your stories in a variety of formats, from video interviews to forensic sketches. In turn, the CAC is commissioning reconfigurations of the organization's unofficial archives by artists like MK Guth, Nina Katchadourian and Kerry Tribe. This effort culminates in the CAC Lobby, where artist Pam Kravetz will orchestrate community-centric projects including a television show, carnivalesque games and a monumental memory quilt.  Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs: Blockbuster (Sept. 12, 2014-Feb.16, 2015)Curated by Kevin MooreThe Swiss-born, Berlin-based duo Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs respond with humor and wit to various traditions of modernist architecture, documentary photography and the heroic travelogue. By pecking at such constructions, the artists reveal a more whimsical, ironic and subjective vision of the structures and technologies that shape the ways we see and live. And while much of their practice is photographic, the artists' engagement with other media — film, sculpture, sound — sheds the artifice of objectivity to celebrate eccentric reconstructions of the world around us. This is the first major museum exhibition for Onorato and Krebs in the United States, presented by FotoFocus. Duke Riley and Frohawk Two Feathers: Based on a True Story (Oct. 10, 2014-March 22, 2015)Curated by Steven MatijcioHistory's once unquestionable integrity has eroded over time, with as much fiction, interpretation and imagination revealed in the pages of our esteemed libraries as actual facts and events. Twisting fact, fantasy and fabrication into an outsider's view of western civilization, this exhibition brings together two artists who have turned historical fiction into a habitual calling. Boston-born Duke Riley marries what he calls "populist myth" and "reinvented historical obscurities" with field research, participatory craft and museological display. Chicago-born, Los Angeles-based Frohawk Two Feathers is an artist, historian, and self-described "myth-maker" who re-imagines 18th century colonial history through a fictive cast of slaves, revolutionaries, militiamen and aristocrats. Anne Lindberg and Saskia Olde Wolbers: Unmade (Oct. 10, 2014-March 22, 2015)Curated by Steven MatijcioArtists Anne Lindberg and Saskia Olde Wolbers dissolve the familiarity that accumulates with time, habit and space. Lindberg pushes drawing on and off the page, obsessively inscribing lines that evade both resolution and definition. Dutch-born, London-based Wolbers orchestrates a cinematic fantasy with equal enigma. By submerging handmade sets into water and coaxing narratives to masquerade as reality, she melts the seemingly digital polish of her films with painterly contingency. The ensuing dialogue between the artist's works softens the geometry of the gallery space, obscuring hard lines and sharp corners to float towards a mysterious horizon. Daniel Arsham: Erasing The Present (March 20-Aug. 16, 2015) Curated by Steven MatijcioThe work of prodigious Cleveland-born artist Daniel Arsham is said to "make architecture do all the things it shouldn't." Blurring the lines between theatre and hallucination, some of his best-known works appear to melt the solidity of gallery walls, such that they appear to be dripping, folding, oozing or absorbing furniture. In more recent years he has begun to cast aging media devices — including cameras, film projectors and microphones — from granulated materials like volcanic ash, sand, crystal and crushed glass. This is the first large-scale Ohio exhibition for Arsham, who became widely known (at the age of 25) when asked to design a stage set for the legendary Merce Cunningham. Albano Afonso: Self-Portrait As Light (March 20-Aug. 16, 2015) Co-Curated by Steven Matijcio and Alice Grey StitesFor Brazilian artist Albano Afonso light is the elusive, but no less essential element that makes painting, photography, film and vision itself possible. Through photographs, installations, projections and luminous objects he gives light a sculptural presence, and measures its ability to both elucidate and obscure. Such affect is spoken through the language of art history, as Afonso reformulates time-honored traditions of portraiture, still life, vanitas and landscape. This will be Afonso's first major exhibition in the United States, and it will extend across the CAC and 21c Museum Hotel. James Lee Byars and Matt Morris: the perfect kiss (QQ)* (April 17-Sept. 13, 2015)Curated by Matt MorrisThroughout his life, American artist James Lee Byars (1932-97) framed his work with elusive notions of questioning and perfection. Both his enduring marriage and his flirtatiousness with German artist Josef Beuys (whom he sent lyrical letters and objects) serve as fodder for an exhibition that is both art and exchange. the perfect kiss (QQ)* is both a curatorial and creative undertaking for Morris, who will develop an installation of works by Byars in conjunction with a number of his own artistic interventions. The exhibition's title references a 1974 artwork by Byars, while also speaking to the 25th anniversary of Robert Mapplethorpe's exhibition The Perfect Moment.  Titus Kaphar: The Vesper Project (April 17 – Sept. 13, 2015)Co-Curated by Titus Kaphar and Steven MatijcioMarrying appropriation, archaeology and iconoclasm, Kaphar's work sifts through the racial politics of art history. The Vesper Project is a massive sculptural statement in which his paintings are woven into the walls of a 19th century American house. It is the culmination of a five-year engagement with the lost storylines of the Vespers, a 19th century family who "passed" as a white family in New England even as their mixed heritage made them "Negro" in the eyes of the law. In this project, the members of this family and their histories are intertwined with Kaphar's autobiographical details, posing broader cultural questions of identity and truth. Performance Season: Taylor Mac: An Abridged Concert of The History of Political Popular Music (1939 – now) (September 2014)Taylor Mac (who prefers the pronoun ‘judy’) is a “ragingly original and bracingly radical [and] best cabaret performer” from New York (TimeOut). The Obie Award-winning playwright, actor, and singer-songwriter transforms into a bedazzled creature who leads us into a decidedly personal history of music, ideas, and ways of being — in a hilarious and healing performance ritual. Mac delves deep into the history of political music for this performance, the latest in judy’s series of concerts exploring the last 240 years of popular songs in America. Funny and moving with a sweet, powerful voice, judy has the bantering skills of a veteran drag artist. Ben Frost: A U R O R A live (October, 2014)Ben Frost’s music is about contrast, influenced as much by classical minimalism as by punk rock and metal. It has a visceral presence, felt as much as heard. Muscular yet cerebral, ambient yet urgent, Frost’s compositions merge guitar-based textures, musique concrète samples, and building-shaking amplified electronics into sweeping digital soundscapes. A U R O R A is the Australian producer’s fifth album. The music leads the audience towards a bleak place filled with synthetic forms, decaying objects and metals devoid of emotion, exploring blinding luminescent alchemy; not with benign heavenly beauty but through decimating magnetic force. In 2010 he was awarded the music protégé in The Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative and spent two years learning from and working with music producer, theorist, and composer, Brian Eno. Last year Frost debuted his first opera, The Wasp Factory, based on the Iain Banks novel and produced “The Enclave,” a multi-channel video and sound installation that premiered at the Venice Biennale. Nils Frahm with Dawn of Midi (November 17, 2014) Since his early childhood, Nils Frahm has been immersed in music, particularly in the styles of classical pianists before him as well as contemporary composers. Today Frahm works as an accomplished composer and producer from his Berlin-based Durton Studio. His unconventional approach to an age-old instrument, played contemplatively and intimately, has won him many fans around the world. Frahm displays an incredibly developed sense of control and restraint in his work, catching the ear of many fans. The recognition of his immense talent has been steadily growing thanks to his previous solo piano works, include Wintermusik (2009) and The Bells (2009), and Felt (2011). Last year, he returned with the celebrated new album Spaces, a collection of pieces that perfectly expresses Frahm’s love for experimentation and answers the call from his fans for a record that truly reflects what they have witnessed during his concerts.
 
 
by Steven Rosen 06.02.2014 91 days ago
Posted In: Performance Art at 09:37 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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CAC Seeks Proposals for Summer Performance Series

Proposals due June 13

The Contemporary Arts Center has issued a call for proposals for a Summer Performance Series. The deadline is June 13. Here is the announcement:The CAC is now accepting proposals for original performance works by artists and collectives from or currently living in the Greater Cincinnati area for the 2014 Summer Performance Series. This series is designed to celebrate the diversity of the local artist community, encourage the development of live art in the region, and provide a new opportunity for artists to showcase new projects and/or works nearing the end of their development.Working in parallel with the CAC’s Black Box Performance Series, we ask artists to take bold risks while surprising themselves and the audience. All performance works will be considered, though a preference towards the multidisciplinary, and those that challenge the artist’s norms, will be of greater interest. Projects will be selected through a proposal process, with an emphasis on new works in development and/or emerging artists. Each artist will work with the CAC performance team to prepare and execute their performance, while be required to create their own work as well as the organization and preparation for the series, the CAC will provide the space, load-in and day-of support, marketing, sound equipment, and projector if needed.The Summer Performance Series will occur at 7 p.m. each Monday during the month of August 2014 within the CAC Black Box, located in the Lower Level. Each evening, two artists from the series will be given the room to realize their production, at a maximum of 50 minutes in length. A stipend of $350 will be provided for each project for creative and developmental support.Deadline: All proposals must be submitted via email, and received by 5 p.m. Friday, June 13, 2014. Please send all applications to dklein@contemporaryartscenter.org or epahutski@contemporaryartscenter.org.
 
 
by Jac Kern 05.16.2014 108 days ago
Posted In: Events at 10:52 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Your Weekend To Do List: 5/16-5/18

The Contemporary Arts Center turns 75 this year and she’s looking as good as ever! Celebrate the CAC’s long history of pushing Cincinnati along the cutting edge with an epic birthday bash tonight. The festivities start at the CAC’s former location in the Mercantile Center with dinner and silent and live auctions from 6-9 p.m. (email sday@contemporaryartscenter.org or call 513-345-8422 to get on the waiting list). More food and drink, dancing and art awaits at the CAC with a Diamonds + Debauchery after-party from 9 p.m.-1 a.m. CityBeat’s own Jesse Fox will be taking fabulous photobooth pics and there will be an appearance by California avant-garde performance artist boychild. After-party tickets are $40 in advance, $75 per couple and $100 for a group of three (online sales end at 4 p.m.) or $50 at the door. Read this week's cover story on the Contemporary Arts Center here. Downtown nightlife staple Mt. Adams Pavilion recently underwent a facelift, complete with interior renovations of the dance floor area and penthouse, new cocktails and a menu created by Chef Brian Duffy (of Bar Rescue fame). Check out the updated digs tonight at Pavilion’s re-launch party from 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Head down to Washington Park for an OTR-rific Saturday with the first City Flea of the season and the eighth annual OTR 5K. City Flea, Cincy’s local curated urban flea market, embarks on its fourth season this weekend, offering handcrafted goods, art, antiques, local grub and more fun goodies from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. The OTR 5K also kicks off at 10 a.m., with festivities following in the park. Northside is a hub for creativity, so it’s fitting that the Cincinnati Arts Association is sponsoring a self-guided tour of Hamilton Avenue artist studios from 2-5 p.m. this Sunday. North By Northside features studio tours, pop-up exhibitions and an overall celebration of art in the eclectic neighborhood. Start at Hoffner Lodge (4120 Hamilton Ave.), where tickets can be purchased beginning at 2 p.m. Sunday, then make your way through several artist studios and creative spaces. Head back to the lodge from 5-7 p.m. for an after-party including food, drinks and music. Tickets are $35; the event benefits non-profit gallery Weston Art Gallery. For more art openings, parties, festivals and other stuff to do this weekend, check out our To Do picks, full calendar and Rick Pender’s Stage Door for weekend theater offerings.
 
 
by Steven Rosen 05.14.2014 110 days ago
Posted In: Visual Art at 10:14 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Raphaela Platow on the CAC’s 2008-2009 Maria Lassnig Show

When I interviewed Raphaela Platow, the Contemporary Arts Center’s director/chief curator, several weeks ago for this week’s CityBeat story about the institution’s 75th anniversary, I asked about some of the highlights of her tenure. One was the 2008-2009 exhibition of abstracted and intense figurative paintings by then-octogenarian Austrian painter Maria Lassnig, who was little known in the U.S. Platow had arranged for the show to travel here from London’s Serpentine Gallery, and it was presented as Lassnig’s first major solo U.S. museum show. It meant a lot to Platow, who as a native of Germany had been familiar with Lassnig’s work, and she was emotional addressing the audience on opening night. (The first CAC show Platow curated, work by Carlos Amorales, also opened that night.) Because of space considerations, not much about the Lassnig show was included in the story, beyond noting it as an example of CAC’s prescience, since MoMA-PS1 currently has a major retrospective of her work and calls her “one of the most important contemporary painters.” Lassnig died last week at age 94. So, as a tribute to and remembrance of her, here are some excerpts from the interview with Platow (that was done before Lassnig’s death): “I had a very personal relationship to the exhibition because I loved the work for many years,” Platow said. “It was really surprising to me she had never had a show in the U.S. I really felt she was one of most prominent female painters there is, and there are not that many female painters of that generation who are not part of the history, part of the discourse. “In the area of painting, it was always the heroic male creating these amazing canvases, and here was Maria always struggling and staying her course. It meant a lot to me to present this first exhibition, and ever since then she won the Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale, and PS1 now has a big show of her work. I’m happy we sort of spearheaded that.” Lassnig did not come to Cincinnati for the opening of her 2008 show here. And as Platow recalled, it wasn’t all that easy even to get her paintings to town. “We ended up taking a show that Serpentine in London put together because it’s extremely difficult to work with her,” she said. “She didn’t want her paintings to fly over ocean. “We had to separate them out and put them on three different planes. She didn’t want all her work to be on one cargo plane. And she was extremely afraid of the work traveling overseas on a trans-Atlantic flight. It was very strenuous to get it here. “I was so happy we did it, and it was a beautiful show and very meaningful for me.” Read more about the CAC’s 75th anniversary here.
 
 

Beautiful Objects, Amazing Environment

Contemporary Arts Center celebrates 75 years of pushing Cincinnati along the cutting edge

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 14, 2014
Peggy Crawford didn’t know the group she helped found in 1939 — Cincinnati’s Modern Art Society — would become so long-lived or vital. It is now the Contemporary Arts Center, which on Friday is celebrating its 75th anniversary.  
by Kelsey Kennedy 04.16.2014 138 days ago
Posted In: Visual Art at 03:19 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Contemporary Arts Center Launches Redesigned Website

The CAC celebrates its 75th anniversary this year

The Contemporary Arts Center marks its 75th anniversary with the launch of its newly redesigned website, contemporaryartscenter.org. By adding a timeline and a list of exhibits dating back to 1939, the updated site highlights some of the museum’s most notable attractions through videos and interactive learning. The historical timeline depicts an honest look at what Cincinnati was like in 1939 and displays the iconic artists that put the CAC on the map. In 1940, Picasso’s Guernica toured the Midwest for its first and only time and made a pit stop in Cincinnati. In 1963, the Pop art show An American Viewpoint was one of the first exhibitions of its kind. And in 1990, nearly 81,000 people visited the Robert Mapplethorpe exhibition. Along with the illustrated timeline and videos, the CAC site also offers lesson plans, exhibit brochures, audio files and slideshows about past exhibits. New features like online ticket admission and family visitor information have been added. After 75 years and hundreds of amazing artists, the Contemporary Arts Center has proven it’s still the coolest place in Cincinnati to spark your creativity and become inspired. FORM, a Cleveland-based creative services firm, designed the visual layout of the site.
 
 

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