What should I be doing instead of this?
 
 
by Steven Rosen 05.25.2016 51 hours ago
Posted In: Visual Art at 12:13 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Contemporary Arts Center Announces 2016-17 Season

The Contemporary Arts Center announced its 2016-17 exhibition season last evening during a special presentation to its Board of Trustees and media. At the same time, it also previewed several performances scheduled for that same season. (There may still be another art exhibition added.) The biggest takeaways from the announcement are that the CAC is striving for diversity in the artists it will show next year, and that it doesn’t believe painting is passé in Contemporary art.  The first show, indeed, features one of Britain’s greatest living painters, Glenn Brown.  “We wanted to celebrate painting,” says Steven Matijcio, CAC curator. “I think because it’s been the preeminent medium of the past, sometimes it gets secondary status in today’s art world. Glenn Brown makes very few works per year because he spends so much time on them. If an Old Master were living today, he would be that person.” Here is the list of shows, edited from a CAC press release. A fuller story will appear in next week’s The Big Picture column in CityBeat. GLENN BROWN Sept. 9, 2016 to Jan. 15, 2017: Organized by the Des Moines Art Center; Curated by Jeff Fleming This is the first solo museum exhibition in the United States to survey the work of renowned London-based artist Brown. Painting steadily for the last three decades, Brown crafts paintings with an immaculate, almost supernatural level of detail and fluidity. ROE ETHRIDGE: NEAREST NEIGHBOR Oct.7 2016 to March 12, 2017 Organized by FotoFocus; Curated by Kevin Moore The exhibition leads the programming for the 2016 FotoFocus Biennial, which explores the theme of the Undocument in photography. Nearest Neighbor is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in the U.S. and will present over 15 years of photographs. NOEL ANDERSON: BLAK ORIGIN MOMENT Feb. 10 to June 18, 2017 Organized by the Contemporary Arts Center; Curated by Steven Matijcio Noel Anderson is a Louisville-born artist and a professor at the University of Cincinnati, presently working in New York City. He is known for complex investigations into the evolving makeup of black-male identity translated through a variety of textiles — from old rugs to digitally produced tapestries.  UGO RONDINONE: CHROMAphile May 5 to Aug. 27, 2017 Organized by the Contemporary Arts Center; Curated by Raphaela Platow This exhibition will celebrate a new iteration of the Swiss-born, NY-based artist Ugo Rondinone’s color spectrum series that congregates his art, the gallery architecture and every visitor to the space as collaborators in an all-encompassing experience.  NJIDEKA AKUNYILI CROSBY: THE PREDECESSORS July 14 to Oct. 20, 2017 Organized by the Contemporary Arts Center & Tang Museum, Skidmore College; Co-Curated by Ian Berry & Steven Matijcio When Njideka Akunyili left Lagos for the U.S. at age 16, she detoured from her initial plan to be a doctor to pursue painting and tell another side of Nigeria’s story. She fuses painting, drawing, collage and the use of transfers — a typically Western printing process that involves transferring ink from photographs using solvent.  JANE BENSON: HALF-TRUTHS July 14 to Oct. 20, 2017 Organized by the Contemporary Arts Center; Curated by Steven Matijcio The story of two Iraqi brothers who escaped from Baghdad in early 2002 becomes a vehicle for British-born, N.Y.-based artist Jane Benson to explore the social reverberations caused by geo-cultural separation. The artist uses music to tell the story in a dual-channel video entitled Finding Baghdad (Part A), which serves as the show’s centerpiece.  THE I-71 PROJECT October through November, 2016  Organized by the CAC, MOCA Cleveland and Columbus Museum of Art; Curated by Anne Thompson The I-71 Project is a collaborative venture uniting three major art centers across Ohio to present art on billboards that confront the theater and confusion of elections in the U.S. It is organized by artist, writer and 2015-16 Missouri School of Journalism Fellow Anne Thompson, who successfully organized a similar project called The I-70 Sign Show. Some of the key artists will include Mel Bochner, Marilyn Minter, and Kay Rosen.Here are the three performances that Drew Klein, performance curator, announced: RADHOUANE EL MEDDEB:  JE DANSE ET JE VOUS EN DONNE A BOUFFER (I DANCE, AND GIVE YOU SOME TO EAT) November 17-18, 2016 Here, Radhouane is immersed in his loves of dancing and cooking, creating and celebrating a bridge between the two. Seated before his couscous maker, he prepares a meal and dances with all the grandeur, generosity and poetry inspired by these two arts.  Between tomato concentrate, zucchini, carrots and cinnamon: a leap, a glance, a suspension or a rupture. Between the semolina and a chassé croisé, the dish simmers. This dazzling choreographic offering evokes all the senses in an almost synesthetic experience, the audience seized by the scents drifting through the air and captivated by the movement infused with generosity and poetry. JAN MARTENS: SWEAT BABY SWEAT  January 19-20, 2017 In Sweat Baby Sweat, Martens zeroes in on the most clichéd theme in dance: the relationship between a man and a woman. He traces the arc of their lifetime together in this physically demanding and intimate examination of a couple that just can’t let each other go.  NAPOLEON MADDOX: TWICE THE FIRST TIME  February 22-24, 2017 In the performance Twice The First Time, Maddox will dance, sing and rap the story of Millie-Christine, conjoined twins born into American slavery in 1851, into the 21st century. They were aunts of Maddox’s grandmother. 
 
 

Art: Unraveled: Textiles Reconsidered at the CAC

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 11, 2016
In Unraveled: Textiles Reconsidered, nine artists deconstruct and reanimate clothing, blankets, rugs and other fabrics into emblems of political and personal expression.   

Political and Personal Metaphors of Textiles

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 11, 2016
In Unraveled: Textiles Reconsidered, nine artists deconstruct and reanimate clothing, blankets, rugs and other fabrics into emblems of political and personal expression.  

Process Makes Perfect

Matt Kish’s pursuit of Moby-Dick leads to CAC show

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 11, 2016
Self-taught artist Matt Kish had just turned 40 in 2009 and was considering giving up after years of receiving little recognition for his work. Breaking through seemed as elusive as catching a great white whale.   

FotoFocus Announces Plans for Fall Biennial

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 20, 2016
When FotoFocus recently released information about its upcoming regional photography biennial in October — its third since 2012 — there was some head scratching from readers about the theme.  
by Maria Seda-Reeder 04.01.2016 56 days ago
Posted In: Arts community, Visual Art, Performance Art at 12:19 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Friday Night Sights

Arts programming that emphasizes ephemeral experiences over art objects

There are so many good art events going on this coming weekend, I wish I could clone myself in order to attend everything without going mad or (maybe worse) hangry. And it’s noteworthy to mention that much of the work being shown Friday evening emphasizes the art-going experience over the exhibition of objects. San Francisco-based Cincinnati-native conceptual artist Tom Marioni gave a lecture at the University of Cincinnati’s College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning and held a participatory performance called Art History, Philosophy and Dirty Jokes at The Littlefield this past Tuesday.  Marioni, who weaves conviviality into all of his work is perhaps best known for his ongoing social art, The Act of Drinking Beer with Friends is the Highest Form of Art, which he’s been enacting since 1970. West-coast conceptualists like Marioni have long investigated public actions as an alternative to the creation of an art object.  Tonigh, Marioni will be present for an opening of his more object-based art (in this case, dry fresco, drawings and bronze sculptures) at Carl Solway gallery, and his work seems like an interesting counterpoint to the very tangible, stitched work of up-and-coming artist Elsa Hansen (b. 1986). Hansen, originally from Louisville, Ky., cross stitches 8-bit portraits of famous subjects like R. Crumb and R. Kelly, or pop cultural events like when Olympic diver Greg Louganis hit his head on the springboard in 1988, and — like Marioni’s work — Hansen’s relies on wit and humor.  Both the Art Academy and UC will have exhibition openings of their students’ thesis work Friday evening. Caliber, the AAC’s senior thesis exhibition will feature the work of six students, while the Contemporary Arts Center hosts the work of 15 MFA students from DAAP. I had the chance to speak with DAAP grad Mary Clare Rietz regarding her ongoing social practice project On The Map|Over-the-Rhine involving what she terms “aesthetic action”.  Rietz and fellow collaborators like social practice artist and AAC professor Anissa Lewis have been working on this project together for several years, engaging unlikely stakeholders from the neighborhood (long-time residents, new residents, developers and business owners) via creative mapping, guided walks, performances, and story sharing. Rietz’s project is informed by a key concept in social network theory, “the strength of weak ties”, i.e. the idea that a network is strongest when people connect across differences. The artist calls OTR a “highly dense, close-quarters place where development is creating diversity but not always connection,” so the potential to connect across difference is ripe here; and Rietz’ decades of experience working in community organizing give her a unique set of skills to respond to these disconnects.  Through conversation and strategic engagement, On The Map|Over-the-Rhine asks the question:  Are people who feel connected more likely to work together toward goals that meet the diverse needs and interests of all? To that aim, the artist has had events happening all week in the lobby of the CAC, and Friday evening Rietz will put on yet another creative community building project, WHO DO YOU WANT TO MOVE?, which will invite viewers to witness and participate in creating connections between unlikely OTR stakeholders, forged though dance.  The participatory performance/procession will start at Buddy’s Place in the heart of OTR at 13th and Vine streets and move to the CAC, where more performances will be put on for museumgoers at 7:30 and 8:30 p.m. Finally, contemporary avant-garde performance art by experimental sound artist Guillermo Galindo and interdisciplinary artist, DAAP professor Mark Harris, opens Friday night at Wave Pool in Camp Washington.  Inspired by John Cage’s words describing music as “a purposeless play,” Galindo and Harris will each perform during the opening night, and the objects left behind after each performance will act as the exhibition in the gallery space — reemphasizing the experience of the performance as the true art form.
 
 

Art: University of Cincinnati DAAP Masters of Art Thesis Exhibition at the Contemporary Arts Center

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 30, 2016
As the only local art school that offers an advanced degree in Fine Art, the University of Cincinnati’s School of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning’s MFA program has long been part and parcel of the area’s arts scene.  

Art: Passage

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 10, 2016
Only a few of us can travel in space like Neil Armstrong or Yuri Gagarin, but we all travel through myriad spaces in everyday life. It’s so common, we rarely even think about it.  

Love List 2016: Lindsay Nehls 

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 10, 2016
Artist Lindsay Nehls seems to have fallen hard for Cincinnati, and after nearly a decade living in the Queen City, she has settled right in.   

Space Travel

Do Ho Suh explores transitional areas in Passage

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 10, 2016
Only a few of us can travel in space like Neil Armstrong or Yuri Gagarin, but we all travel through myriad spaces in everyday life.   

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