WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Steven Rosen 12.04.2015 71 days ago
Posted In: COMMUNITY, Culture, Music at 12:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Memorial Marker Unveiled For 1979 Who Concert Tragedy

The cold temperature Thursday night was appropriate for the solemn gathering on the plaza outside the main entrance of U.S. Bank Arena. Since the 30th anniversary of the Dec. 3, 1979 Who concert tragedy — 11 people died in the crush trying to get inside the doors of what was then Riverfront Coliseum — Cincinnati USA Music Heritage Foundation has been having memorial observances with lighting of lanterns outside the site on that date. At last night’s observance, which drew a sizeable crowd, the organization unveiled the two-sided memorial marker that will now permanently be at the location. It had been a long time in the works. Before that occurred, Andy Bowes — brother of victim Peter Bowes of Wyoming — gave a speech to the crowd that included reading a statement of support for the memorial from the Who’s longtime manager, Bill Curbishley. Here it is: “With the laying of the marker in dedication to those that lost their lives at the Riverfront Coliseum, on this day in 1979, I would like to pay tribute from myself and the two surviving members of the Who, Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend. I can fully understand how difficult it has been for the families who lost a loved one to go forward and attempt to regain their lives. That night will always stay with myself, Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend. It is a scar from the past and though the wound has healed, the scar is still there to be touched on occasion and felt. The band themselves were not aware of what had happened and were playing on stage when I was informed and saw the devastation on the plaza level. Nothing will erase that memory other than their soft edges. “It’s with this in mind that I decided not to attend today because I felt it should not be turned into a Who media day or circus. There has to be dignity to this ceremony and the unfolding of the dedication of remembrance. This is not about the Who or their music but it’s about the families involved. Many people suffered as a result of that day and I am sure that many still do. If myself and the band can be of any assistance in the healing process going forward we are there for you. Love Bill Curbishley” Mayor John Cranley, who promised at last year’s observance to dedicate a permanent memorial marker at this one, also gave a brief, moving address. He closed with, “Something happened a long time ago but is still with us. As your mayor, I’m proud to stand with you and say we will never forget.” The band, itself, posted a short online comment, “Today we remember those 11 Who fans who lost their lives in the crush to enter the Riverfront Coliseum in Cincinnati, Ohio. May they rest in peace.” Incidentally, something that seems to have gone overlooked at the time it occurred here but has continuing resonance and pertinence today can be discovered in a YouTube clip of Pearl Jam playing at U.S. Bank Arena on Oct. 1, 2014. During that band’s 2000 appearance at a Danish festival, nine fans in the mosh pit died from suffocation. At U.S. Bank Arena, Eddie Veder reminded the crowd about the tragedy outside the arena in 1979 and how the Who “have to go on living with that event that happened 35 years ago. That became something we had to learn about, and they reached out to us when we really needed it.” Pear Jam then played “The Real Me,” the last song the Who performed in Cincinnati at the December 3, 1979 show. Here’s the clip: For more background on this new memorial, read my Big Picture column in this week's issue.
 
 

Surfer Blood with Eternal Summers

Wednesday • Southgate House Revival

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 15, 2014
Surfer Blood is now a well-oiled live unit, delivering its reverb-laden tunes with the dexterity they deserve.  

mewithoutYou with The Appleseed Cast and Hop Along

Friday • Southgate House Revival

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 8, 2014
A spin through Foxes today reveals a slightly more complex and lyrically esoteric group, but mewithoutYou’s relevance and visceral impact remain intact on its recent work.  

Zebrahead with MxPx, Allister and Survay Says!

Thursday • Southgate House Revival

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 8, 2014
Born in the late 1990s and hitting its cultural peak in the early 2000s, the La Habra, Calif., Zebrahead emerged when Rap Rock was the sound du jour.  

Cherub with Ghost Beach and Gibbz

Wednesday • 20th Century Theater

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 8, 2014
Don’t let the band’s angelically chubby name throw you off. Cherub is slinky, kinky sex on a synth and they want to show you their … show  
by Belinda Cai 10.17.2013
Posted In: Reviews at 11:07 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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REVIEW: Man Man at the Wexner Center for the Arts (Columbus, Ohio)

Man Man is a band that thrives on live performances, aka circus-themed Halloween parties sprinkled with confetti and a touch of grotesqueness. The five-piece experimental group has an insatiable flair for the dramatic and is never short of kooky stage props. This held true at Tuesday’s performance at the Wexner Center of the Arts, where a sleeping Furby, a werewolf-like skeleton holding a wig and a colorful glow-in-the-dark drum set augmented the band’s theatrical presentation. Front man Honus Honus (Ryan Kattner) dazzled as he frantically played the keys — often times with his foot, even — and sang with his customary raspy fervor. He was a shape-shifter extraordinaire, transforming from normal dude to circus ringmaster of sorts to alien. His manic wardrobe changes were anticipated, as it is basically a Honus trademark. The rest of the band — Pow Pow, T. Moth, Brown Sugar, Shono Murphy, as well as talented opening artist Xenia Rubinos — likewise entertained with lots of dancing and instrumental finesse. All of this is pretty formulaic for Man Man. However, it’s not every day that the audience at a concert gets to share the stage with the band itself. The show took place in the “black box” space of the Wex’s vast Mershon auditorium that seats nearly 2,500 people. Guests stood on the stage, which was blocked off from the rest of the auditorium, to watch the show in an intimate, tight-knit setting — ideal for moshing and the like. Unfortunately, the concession at show was lacking. There were $1 waters and pops available but no booze, which perhaps explained why there was little to no moshing. Although highly energetic crowds and moshing are routine at Man Man concerts, the Columbus show was just as fun without the raucousness. It had more of a respectful “in awe” type crowd, which fit nicely with the band’s attempt at adopting a more mature and refined sound with their new album.                                                                                                                     Man Man kicked off their set list with “Oni Swan” and “Pink Wonton,” the first and second tracks off of their recently released album, On Oni Pond. “Oni Swan” is a brief instrumental opener for the catchy and vibrant “Pink Wonton,” which critics claim most closely embodies Man Man’s previous musical style. On Oni Pond was the focal point of the show and this was made evident by the backdrop that showcased the album art courtesy of artist Andrea Wan. The band affectionately played tracks such as the sultry “Paul’s Grotesque,” the boisterous “Loot My Body,” their more relaxed and heartfelt single “Head On,” “King Shiv” and “Born Tight.” It was apparent that Man Man embraces its newer, mellower sound, which has a focus on bona fide lyricism rather than sheer eccentricity. The band also made sure to satisfy diehard fans of their previous albums Life Fantastic, Rabbit Habits, Six Demon Bag and The Man In A Blue Turban With A Face by playing hits such as “Zebra,” Piranhas Club,” “Mister Jung Stuffed,” “Hurly / Burly,” “Doo Right,” “Push the Eagle’s Stomach” and others. Despite the new direction of On Oni Pond, the overall eccentricity of Man Man was not lost during the concert. In fact, the band upped the ante in this aspect. Honus came out in a sparkly hooded cloak during “Haute Tropique,” a song about a serial killer, and proceeded to fling confetti onto the audience. He did this as he sang, “Oh here's a story of a lovely lady / Who had three daughters who drove her fucking crazy / She hacked ‘em up with an old machete / And threw a party with dead daughter confetti.” Grotesque has never been so fun and glittery. I have to admit that the best part of the show was the extended encore, during which Honus came out in an Anderson Cooper shirt that my sister just so happened to airbrush for him. “I love it. Maybe I’ll actually give it to Anderson,” he said to her before the show, when she presented it to him. (Yes, my sister and Honus are acquainted and yes, I am totes jealous.) Honus had a cameo on Anderson Cooper 360° in September in regard to Man Man’s Wolf Blitzer-themed song, “End Boss.” He appeared on the segment in a bad ass tunic with Wolf’s face plastered all over it and, hey, it got Anderson’s attention. What more could one want?So Honus came out for the encore in the Anderson shirt and proceeded to perform four very popular fan favorites from older albums — “Steak Knives,” “Van Helsing Boom Box,” “Engrish Bwudd” and “Young Einstein on the Beach.” The first two songs were melancholic and heartfelt, playing on the emotions of the audience. The latter two were crowd-pumping, face-melting tracks that completely changed the atmosphere from somber to vivacious, ending the show on a high note. Even without the booze, Man Man was one hell of a party and a band that is worth every dollar to see live.
 
 

St. Vincent with Andrew Bird

Oct. 14 • Bogart's

0 Comments · Monday, October 12, 2009
Annie Clark, aka St. Vincent, is an accomplished singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who's no longer in the shadows of The Polyphonic Spree and Sufjan Stevens, with whom she toured as a guitarist and vocalist. They did open her ears, though, shaping her jazzy approach to songwriting.  

Slick Idiot with Chakras, Riothead, Common Man Down, Blood Werk and Another Tragedy

Oct. 9 • The Mad Hatter

0 Comments · Monday, October 5, 2009
It's perplexing to figure out what angle Slick Idiot is going for. With CDs bearing appellations like 'DickNity,' 'Screwtinized' and 'xSCREWciating,' what does the German Industrial outfit expect the crude puns to represent? Does the band traffic in some kind of satire or social commentary, or is it sexualized synth Rock that's unashamedly silly?   

Birds of Avalon

Oct. 12 • Northside Tavern

0 Comments · Monday, October 5, 2009
It's been five years since bassist Paul Siler and guitarist Cheetie Kumar broke ranks from Garage Rock titans Cherry Valence, got married after nearly a decade of dating and assembled their new band project, Birds of Avalon. Steered by a love of The Beatles, Led Zeppelin and John Coltrane and galvanized by a contemporary vibe, the band puts all of its energy into touring as much as possible.   

Tomorrows Bad Seeds

Oct. 3 • Southgate House

0 Comments · Monday, September 28, 2009
For the past five years, L.A.'s Tomorrows Bad Seeds have been honing their hard rocking version of Reggae, Metal, Punk and Hip Hop to increasingly loyal and exponentially larger audiences at home and around the country. Spicing Rock with island rhythms is certainly no new development, as they're the latest in a long line of Rock bands with an affinity for Jamaica's second favorite export (and working knowledge of the export in the No. 1 slot as well).  

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