What should I be doing instead of this?
 
 

Classical Music: The Cunning Little Vixen

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 6, 2016
The Cunning Little Vixen marks Vince DeGeorge’s first time staging an opera, and he says it’s a perfect work for his debut. The story’s mesh of animal and human worlds intrigue him; the brilliant score depicts the animal world and humanity with warm lyricism, gentle humor and an unflinching acceptance of nature’s cycle.  

Foxy Lady

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 6, 2016
The Cunning Little Vixen marks Vince DeGeorge’s first time staging an opera, and he says it’s a perfect work for his debut. The story’s mesh of animal and human worlds intrigue him; the brilliant score depicts the animal world and humanity with warm lyricism, gentle humor and an unflinching acceptance of nature’s cycle.  

Lisa Howard Began Her Broadway Career at CCM

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 16, 2016
A native of Akron, Ohio, Howard came to CCM in 1993. Her family supported her aspirations; only one high school teacher questioned her career plans. She’s proved that chemistry teacher wrong.  
by Rick Pender 03.11.2016 74 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 10:53 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door 3-11 - mockingbird @ cincy playhosue - dale hodges - mikki schaffner photography

Stage Door

Mockingbird, love letters and whiffs of Fringe

Looking for some good theater this weekend? There’s plenty to choose from on Cincinnati stages. Last evening I was at the Cincinnati Playhouse for the opening performance of To Kill a Mockingbird. If you’ve read Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel or seen the classic film starring Gregory Peck, you know the story. But I bet you’ve never seen it quite the way Playhouse Associate Artist Eric Ting has staged this one. Reminiscent of Our Town, it’s played out on an all-but-bare stage — no scenery, minimal props — just great storytelling acting, including a lot of local professionals: Dale Hodges, Annie Fitzpatrick, Torie Wiggins, Ken Early, Barry Mulholland, Jared Joplin, Randy Bailey and three sensational kids. The set is deceptively simple, but used very effectively with Ting choreographing the action using two concentric “revolves,” atmospheric lighting and sound effects. The Playhouse clearly has a winner with this production. It just opened and the demand for tickets is already so strong that it’s been extended to April 10, a week beyond the initially announced closing. Tickets: 513-421-3888. When you put together a songwriting team like Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick (the guys behind Fiddler on the Roof) and a writer like Joe Masteroff (he also wrote the script for Cabaret), the results ought to be good. And they were in 1963 when She Loves Me debuted on Broadway. Set in a 1930s perfumery, it’s about two shop clerks, Amalia and Georg, who don’t see eye to eye; both lonely and yearning for love, they unwittingly end up as pen-pals — and a warm-hearted comic romance ensues. (Sound familiar? It’s also the story of the Tom Hanks-Meg Ryan hit film from 1998, You’ve Got Mail.) She Loves Me was revived on Broadway in 1993, and there’s a current production of it w by Roundabout Theatre Company. But you don’t have to travel to New York City to enjoy this charming show, since it’s onstage at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts through April 3. Tickets: 513-241-6550. There are numerous whiffs of Fringe shows in the air this weekend. Beertown continues at Know Theatre through March 19, a concept brought to town by dog & pony dc, a group that’s performed more than once at Cincinnati Fringe Festivals. This one is an exercise in civics that happens to be highly entertaining, as a small town decides which items to keep or replace in a time capsule that’s reviewed every five years. Audiences get to join the conversation — and they do. With a cast featuring a lot of local improv and acting talent, Beertown is a thoroughly entertaining production, and it can go in different directions every time it’s performed. Know is also presenting a double bill of two past Fringe award winners — Petunia and Chicken from Animal Engine and Edgar Allan from the Coldharts. The former is a story of love and loss inspired by the works of Midwestern Prairie author Willa Cather; two actors play all the parts piece. Edgar Allan was inspired by imagining the boyhood of Edgar Allan Poe. If you missed these shows during the 2013 and 2015 festivals, you can see them at Know’s Jackson Street theater on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday. Tickets, for one or both shows, which are both presented each evening: 513-300-5669 or at the door. If you’re still pining for Fringe-styled shows, try Transmigration 2016 at the University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music, featuring student-created works presented tonight and Saturday evening at 7 p.m. This annual event by CCM’s drama program features teams of actors who write, promote, stage and perform a handful of 30-minute shows. For 2016 the titles are “Elliot Popkin: The Best Friends I Never Had,” “The Elephant in the Room,” “The Family,” “Colony Collapse Disorder,” “Vices” and “A Brief Eternity.” Show up for an evening and dash around the CCM complex to see four of these unpredictable but wildly creative pieces. Admission is free, but reservations are required: 513-556-4183. Also at CCM: The thrashing, pulsating production of American Idiot continues through Sunday at Patricia Corbett Theater on the UC campus. If you’re a fan of Punk Rock (the show is a stage version of Green Day’s 2004 recording), this is the show for you … Prefer something more sedate? Head downtown for Cincinnati Shakespeare’s stage adaptation of Jane Austen’s Emma, which continues through March 26. Tickets: 513-381-2273. Rick Pender’s STAGE DOOR blog appears here every Friday. Find more theater reviews and feature stories here.
 
 

Exercises in Civics and Desperation

0 Comments · Monday, March 7, 2016
Fringe shows have a way of sneaking up on you with profound messages when you least expect them. That’s exactly what happens with Beertown, currently onstage at Know Theatre.   
by Rick Pender 03.04.2016 81 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 11:55 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door  3-4 - know theatre and dog & pony dc present beertown - id ltor - aiden sims - mike hall - wyckham avery - photo by daniel r. winter

Stage Door

A time capsule, Punk Rock, newsboys and Austen girls

Take your pick from four wildly different shows on Cincinnati stages this weekend. For something completely different, check out Beertown at Know Theatre (through March 19). It’s a national touring project by dog & pony dc, a company that was here for several recent Cincinnati Fringes. The show is set in an imagined American town that opens a time capsule every five years to review its “eternal” and “ephemeral” contents. With the exception of dog & pony dc actor Wyckham Avery as the town’s patronizing mayor, the performers are all Cincinnati actors, a majority with significant improv experience. They solemnly execute the “20th quinquennial” ceremony to revise what’s saved and removed, relying on voluntary input from the audience as to what’s most important for the community. The show includes interspersed scenes (injected as “antecedents”) that reveal details of the century-long tradition. Beertown starts out feeling like an amusing Fringe show — artifacts range from serious items such as antique photos and a family bible to trivia such as pink slips and a “jar of smoke” — but by the time it’s over, with some cleverly planted messages from the ably played “townspeople,” you realize you’ve been part of a civic exercise that has depth as it explores just what’s important to a community. Know’s artistic director Andrew Hungerford says, “There’s nothing newer than a show that is created in partnership with the audience each night.” I’m not a fan of theatrical audience participation, but I was surprised and gratified by how Beertown unfolded and landed its messages. By the way, you’re invited to bring desserts to share for the potluck before ceremony begins. Tickets: 513-300-5669. The Disney musical Newsies, based the 1992 film, is in town through March 13 at the Aronoff Center. The true story is unsubtle and predictable: Downtrodden newsboys in 1899 New York City get fed up with the high-handed ways of arrogant publisher Joseph Pulitzer and go on strike. Their “children’s crusade” wins out and improves conditions for kids who hawked papers on street corners. There’s no question from the outset that these spunky young fellows are going to succeed; Pulitzer is an unadulterated greedy villain, and Jack Kelly (Joey Barreiro), the Peter Pan-like leader of the boys is played as the hero from the get-go. Nevertheless, Newsies indeed showcases athletic dancing — about 15 high-energy young men who high-kick, cartwheel and back-flip around the stage for more than two hours to imaginative choreography by Christopher Gattelli. The production’s design, big pieces of Erector Set-like structures that double as fire escapes and more, roll into various configurations and provide surfaces for video projections that set the scene. Not profound, but fun to watch. Tickets: 513-621-2787. An additional note: The show’s “newsboys” will present a special evening of song and dance on Monday evening at 7:30 p.m. in the Aronoff’s Jarson-Kaplan Theater with the proceeds to benefit Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS. Tickets start at $25: cincinnatiarts.org/newsboys. For another musical populated by disaffected youth dancing, check out American Idiot at the University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music. Onstage at Patricia Corbett Theater, like Newsies, this show is rooted in real events — it opens with ominous video recollections of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. It’s based on Green Day’s 2004 Punk Rock album, full of anger and angst. The show is more impressionistic than narrative following three young men yearning to escape the deadening humdrum of suburbia to do something, be somewhere, where they will feel more real. But crushing reality — ranging from parental responsibility to military service and drug addiction — bears down in depressing ways on them. After pain and searching, they find their way to stasis if not happiness. Along the way, the production, staged by Aubrey Berg with music direction by Steve Goers, pounds out Green Day’s mostly anxious songs; of singular note is CCM senior Samantha Pollino’s thrashing, hair-whipping, fist-punching choreography. One word of caution: This show is no-holds-barred in terms of drug use, sexual content and profanity. But frankly (and I do mean frankly), that’s a big part of what it’s about. It’s onstage through March 13. Tickets: 513-556-4183. Staged by veteran company member Kelly Mengelkoch, Emma (through March 26) lives up to Cincy Shakes previous productions of stage adaptations of Jane Austen’s novels — romances, first and foremost, navigating the ins and outs of love and relationships in the early 19th century. Austen’s central characters are usually feisty but moral women, strong-minded and judgmental, and they match up well with the versatile female talent in Cincy Shakes’ acting company. First and foremost is Courtney Lucien as Emma Woodhouse, whose confidence in her matchmaking skills puts her in several pickles with friends and acquaintances as well as personally. The object of Emma’s plans is the modest Harriet Smith, played by Caitlin McWethy, who often says as much with demeanor and facial expression as with the words provided by Jon Jory’s adaptation of the 1813 novel. Despite some derailments along the way, Emma is awash in wit and good humor. I gave this production a Critic’s Pick. Tickets: 513-381-2273. Rick Pender’s STAGE DOOR blog appears here every Friday. Find more theater reviews and feature stories here. 
 
 

Onstage: American Idiot

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 2, 2016
The show is not easy to watch: American Idiot takes a hard, cynical look at jaded youth who struggle with the expectations of the American Dream and come to epitomize a generation that failed to launch.  

The Times of Their Lives

CCM presents Green Day Rock opera American Idiot

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 2, 2016
The stage production of American Idiot expands on the album, focusing on Johnny, Will and Tunny, who yearn to flee their arid suburban existence.  

Their Education Is Entertainment for the Rest of Us

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 17, 2016
Don’t lose track of theater on university campuses, because there’s a lot of it. It’s a chance to see works that are less likely to be produced by theaters where selling lots of tickets is a necessity.  

Love List 2016: Eddy Kwon

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 10, 2016
Growing up in Minneapolis, violinist, composer and teacher Eddy Kwon was surrounded by water and trees, but also arts and music via the city’s diverse cultural centers and two orchestras.   

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