Event: Mythbusters: Jamie & Adam Unleashed!

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 18, 2015
You’ve seen the Emmy-nominated show; now you can live it.   

Film: OutReels Cincinnati

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 11, 2015
Since its inception four years ago, OutReels Cincinnati has pursued a mission to showcase LGBTQ issues through lectures and film.   

Sound Advice: Sufjan Stevens with Gallant

Friday • Aronoff Center

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 11, 2015
“Fourth of July,” the centerpiece of Sufjan Stevens’ latest album — the stripped-down, Elliott Smith-esque Carrie & Lowell — is as intimate and revealing as anything in the crafty singer/songwriter’s songbook.   

What We Mean When We Discuss All-American Stories

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 11, 2015
All of the great real-life sports dramas work from the same basic premise — that of an underdog facing nearly impossible odds with determination and an undeniable sense of hope.   

Music: Sufjan Stevens

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 11, 2015
“Fourth of July,” the centerpiece of Sufjan Stevens’ latest album — the stripped-down, Elliott Smith-esque Carrie & Lowell — is as intimate and revealing as anything in the crafty singer/songwriter’s songbook.   
by Rick Pender 10.16.2015 46 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 10:36 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
stage door 10-16 - bruce cromer as willie loman in death of a salesman @ cincy shakes - photo mikki schaffner

Stage Door: A Dying Salesman, Barbra Streisand and a Prince in Search of Meaning

There are almost too many good shows for you to enjoy this weekend, but depending on what you like, you’ll probably find it somewhere.Cincy Shakes production of Death of a Salesman doesn’t open until tonight, but all sings point to a strong production, headlined by one of our region’s best actors, Bruce Cromer, as beaten-down Willie Loman, who I interviewed for my CityBeat column this week. He’s matched with another fine local stage performer Annie Fitzpatrick as Willie’s faithful but worried wife; two of the Shakespeare team’s excellent company of actors, Jared Joplin and Justin McCombs, play Willie’s sons who can’t quite bear up to the weight of his expectations. Arthur Miller’s play is one of the greatest, a winner of the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award. So if it’s serious drama, get tickets for this one, onstage through Nov. 7: 513-381-2273. Want something more frivolous and entertaining, but still a great performance? Show up at Ensemble Theatre for Buyer and Cellar, a one-man show about a guy pretending to be a shopkeeper in a vast basement treasure trove of acquisitions on Barbra Streisand’s Malibu estate. It’s 90 minutes of non-stop storytelling, rooted in a real place — but with a fantasized chain of events. Actor Nick Cearley is a comic gem, performing in a smartly written script that requires him to conjure up not just Alex, the actor hired to wait on Barbra, “the customer” (one and only), but the singer herself and a handful of others. Great fun to watch. Here’s my review. Through Nov. 1. Tickets: 513-421-3555.If you love a good Broadway musical, you need to show up at the Aronoff and score a seat for the touring production of Pippin. (CityBeat review here.) It’s a show from 40 years ago (by Stephen Schwartz, the creator of Wicked more recently), but this version of an award-winning Broadway revival from two years ago is full of Cirque du Soleil-styled acrobatics, as well as some great songs and performers. It’s a sort of fairytale embroidered from a real historical character from the 9th century, the son of the monarch who launched the Holy Roman Empire. It’s about the young Pippin’s arduous search for a meaningful life. The “Leading Player,” a kind of emcee/storyteller, is Gabrielle McClinton, who handled the role on Broadway for part of its two-year run there, and Charlemagne, Pippin’s father, is played by veteran actor John Rubinstein — who originated the title role back in 1972. (He’s 68 now, but still an energetic, animated performer.) Tickets: 513-621-2787.Shows previous opened that are also worth seeing include the very serious drama Extremities at the Incline Theater in E. Price Hill (tickets: 513-241-6550), onstage through Sunday; and Sex with Strangers, a very modern romance about writers who envy one another’s careers and lust after one another’s bodies, has another week and a half at the Cincinnati Playhouse (tickets: 513-421-3888).Rick Pender’s STAGE DOOR blog appears here every Friday. Find more theater reviews and feature stories here.

Twenty Years of the Aronoff

Once controversial, the multifaceted performing arts center is now downtown’s go-to venue

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 14, 2015
As the Aronoff Center for the Arts marks its 20th anniversary on Oct. 21, it’s generally known as the place to be for major performances by Broadway touring shows, lectures, comedians, musical acts and more. But back in the early 1990s, it was a controversial project.  

From The Ground Up

World premiere of 'King Arthur's Camelot' is the centerpiece of Cincinnati Ballet's 50th anniversary season

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 12, 2014
Honor, valor, love, betrayal — these are the thematic elements of Cincinnati Ballet artistic director and CEO Victoria Morgan’s full-length world premiere, King Arthur’s Camelot, opening this weekend with five performances at the Aronoff Center.   

Cultural Traditions Inspire Story of Community

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 29, 2014
 Zvi Gotheiner's modern dance company appears this weekend for the second time in Cincinnati as part of ZviDance/Dabke, presented by Contemporary Dance Theater.   

Exhale Dance Tribe Celebrates 10 Years in Cincinnati

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 4, 2015
This weekend, 14 Tribe dancers (along with Hubbard, who will solo) will perform at the Aronoff’s Jarson-Kaplan Theater in a mixed bill revisiting a selection of characteristic vignettes from the past 10 years of evening-length productions.