WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Amy Harris 03.06.2015 6 hours ago
Posted In: Live Stream, Interview at 10:10 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
the glorious sons 2014 promo (b&w landscape pc jess baumung)

Q&A with The Glorious Sons

Up-and-coming Canadian rockers play Newport this Sunday

The Glorious Sons are a strong up-and-coming act out of Canada (Kingston, Ontario, to be exact) with a Rock sound that’s a little rough around the edges, just the way they want it.  The band isn’t trying to fit into a cookie cutter world of the music industry but deliver an authentic sound that connects with audiences. The Glorious Sons are currently on a U.S. club tour, but one listen to their new EP shows big things are on the horizon. They are currently touring with 10 Years, Otherwise and Luminoth. The tour comes to the Thompson House in Newport this Sunday (tickets/more info here). Get on the bandwagon early and come out to enjoy a night of great Rock music.  CityBeat spoke with frontman Brett Emmons to discuss the grind to get to where the band is today. CityBeat: I know you are on this tour with 10 Years and Otherwise. How did this tour come together? Brett Emmons: Our agent put the offer on the table for us back when we were on tour with Airborne in Canada. I am not really sure how it all came together but we knew if we went on tour with (10 Years) in the States, they wanted to come on tour with us in Canada. We have a pretty big draw in Canada whereas nobody really knew us in the States before we started this tour. So we sat down for breakfast and started talking with each other and we decided we were going to do the tour. We looked forward to it and two months later we were on the road with 10 Years.  CB: I recently listened to the album this week and I have to be honest, I think it is one of the best things I have heard in a long time and I have specific questions about some songs on the album. BE: Thank you. CB: One of my favorite songs on the album was “Amigo.” Could you tell me a little bit of the backstory behind that song and how it came about? BE: One thing when you are writing tunes, at least for us, it follows like every other song, a loose story with a lot of feelings. When I start writing, I never know what the ending is going to be like or what the song is going to completely look like. I know what the song’s direction is going to be but I never start the story at the end. It is about my time in Halifax when I was there a couple years and there was a particular person that I was hanging around with a lot and writing a lot of music with. It’s about his fall from grace during the time I was hanging out with him and my fall from grace as well. It is about watching someone with so much potential self-doubt themselves and losing it all because they were scared. CB: You brought up writing the lyrics. Can you talk about the band’s process and how you put the songs together and write together? BE: We all do help with lyrics, too. If there is a lyric that is not covered right, everybody has their input; there are five guys and five guys who think they are songwriters and so you are never really short on ideas.  Usually somebody will bring something to the jam room and we will either be jiving with it or not jiving with it. What happens, someone will start playing something or singing something and somebody else will join in and a third person will join in and you will have five guys trying to whittle this broad thing into a song. Other times it may start with a bass riff or playing. We don’t have an equation for it and I don’t think we should. It is basically about spontaneity and just people working together doing their thing. Everybody has their job and everybody likes to do it. It comes pretty easy right now. Who knows? I imagine when we are 40 we will be dead tired.  CB: The thing I felt was interesting about the album was all the songs sound different. Sometimes I get albums and every song sounds the same, basically. I thought it was unique that, song to song, there was a different flavor you would get while listening.  BE: Yeah. That is what we thought, too. A lot of bands tend to use digital songs now and try to find what their sound is. We just rock and roll. We didn’t know what we wanted to sound like or what we wanted to be. We are just five guys playing instruments trying to write songs and whatever way they come out is the way we want people to hear them.  When you listen to the Stones, not every song on a Stones album sounds the same. If you think about that, nowadays, I feel like too many people are trying to fit themselves into a genre rather than finding out what happens. CB: When did you know that this is what you wanted to do for your career? BE: In high school I was asked to sing for a band and I didn’t know how to sing. I couldn’t sing worth a shit and I started singing with that band. They kicked me out of the band because they wanted a real singer. I bought an acoustic guitar and I took one of my favorite songs and I practiced it for months. I practiced singing it and I practiced playing it until my voice sounded good enough. Then I put a band together and we beat (the band I was kicked out of) in the Battle of the Bands and I won best singer at the show. For the first time I put together a song and started singing and realized how fun it was and I could be myself. When I started writing songs, I could put myself on paper and give myself a sound and words. That’s when I realized I wanted to do it.  Growing up my brother (Glorious Sons guitarist Jay Emmons) was in a band, a guitarist in a band. I grew up watching him play my entire life. When I really started playing, we started jamming together. It was always a dream of ours to throw a band together and play music together for a living. We didn’t know it would be this good but we just wanted to pay our bills with music and write songs. That has ended up happening and we are pretty happy. CB: I have been talking to several bands that have siblings that play together. Are there any issues with that, being with your brother all the time? BE: No. We argue a little bit because we are brothers and the most open with each other. He has always been my best friend and my rock. I grew up with him, taking advice from him, basically worshipping the ground he walked on. We are best friends. Playing in a band with your brother can go one of two ways — you can be assholes to each other or be real and good to each other, which is what we do, even though we are assholes sometimes. CB: You said earlier you played one song over and over, what was that song? BE: It’s a song called “Wheat Kings” by Tragically Hip, it’s a Canadian band. I’m not sure you would know them but they are Rock royalty, maybe Canada’s favorite band of all time within country. They come down here and play but in Canada every show they play is in a sold-out stadium.  CB: One of the songs on the album is “The Union,” which is also the title of the album. It seems to have a social and political message. Was that on purpose? BE: No, not really. I’d like to clear this up, so I’m glad you asked. A few people get a bad taste in their mouth about the chorus: “I’ll never join the union because I never wanted it easy.” When you listen to the song it is just a metaphor for life and growing up and wanting to be different and still wanting to question things and question society and be the dirty little kid that you were when you were young and not caring about what people thought. There are some ties to the subject a little bit. My father’s shop was almost shut down when we were younger by a union. It was kind of an ode to him because he was able to maintain his shop without the union. He went from having 10 employees to having one employee. We went through some hard times but he was able to keep the family together and keep the shop up and running and to this day provide a comfortable life for us.  It is not a political stand against any union in any way. It is about growing up and not doing what everyone wants you to do. CB: A lot of bands are collaborating now and playing together. I know you guys are just starting out but is there anybody you’d like to do a dream collaboration with? BE: I’d love to pick Bruce Springsteen’s brain a little bit. Words, mostly. He is one of my favorites of all time. That is a huge dream though. In Canada, we collaborate with people like The Trews and heroes from that country and it would be cool to see what it would be like to write with Kings of Leon or bands like that. Mainly, we are more focused on collaborating with each other. Everyone in our band knows what we want. We work well together. I guess it would be fun to collaborate with (KoL’s) Caleb Followill or The Tallest Man on Earth or someone like that but, again, these are big, big pipe dreams. CB: You mentioned The Trews. I know you worked with (Trews guitarist) John-Angus MacDonald on your first and second EP. What was that process like and why did you choose him? I recently talked to Godsmack and they were talking about the role of their producer and that he keeps the peace and how they really trust and listen to him. Why did you choose MacDonald and how did you work together? BE: When we chose him … he chose us actually. We were playing a competition and we won it. He was one of the judges and came up to me after the show and said he wanted to see what it would be like to produce one of our albums. My brother grew up going to Trews shows and we were all fans of The Trews. Basically, that was the most excited I have ever been in my entire life. It felt like our shot and it really was. He took a chance on us. We got into the studio and we started playing our tunes and listening to him and fighting with him a bit too on things.  We didn’t really look for a producer. At the time, I don’t think I even knew what a producer did. I had never had a producer on any of my albums before and I never really made an album that had cost any amount of real money. We got in there and he showed us the ropes of what it was like to work in a real studio. We let him go off when he had a good idea or a good pass. When I felt like what he was doing was against my vision, I’d take a hard stance and he’d have to prove me wrong or he’d listen to me. He was really the guy who found our band and took a chance on us. He is the reason we are doing this for a living right now. We love the guy and he has been so good to us. He is one of our best friends. He took us on tour. It has been such a great experience with him.  CB: It sounds like you guys are excited to be on the road. What is your craziest tour story so far? BE: It was on our first tour in Canada. It was in late November, just before December. The snow was falling and it was starting to get really cold. The bus we were on broke down on the highway and was unfixable. We had to rent a U-Haul truck because it was the only thing that had a hitch on it and we weren’t going to leave our trailer that had all our gear in it. For two weeks, we slept in the back of a U-Haul moving truck while two people drove, in the Canadian cold. It was a tough couple weeks, but then again, we knew stuff like that was going to happen, if you spend your life on the road, especially with your vehicles. But you get over things like that. When we finally got off the U-Haul, we were home in Kingston. It made being home that much better.
 
 

The Contortionist with Revocation, Fallujah, Toothgrinder, The Requiem and Sea of Treachery

Saturday • Thompson House

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 25, 2015
Although hints of growled dirty vocals sometimes form an undercurrent to the proceedings and even push to the forefront, The Contortionist seems detached from the Deathcore/Death Metal proponents with which it is often grouped.  
by Mike Breen 12.09.2014 87 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Music Video at 10:27 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Music Tonight: Yelawolf and The Lone Bellow

Alabama-born Hip Hop artist Yelawolf plays Newport’s Thompson House tonight at 7 p.m. Tickets are $25. Yelawolf began making waves in 2005 after self-releasing his debut album, Creek Water. The gifted MC landed a major-label deal with Columbia within two years, but the deal fizzled out and Yelawolf returned to working the underground. By the start of this decade, Yelawolf’s signed with Eminem’s Shady Records. His debut for the label, 2011’s Radioactive, featured guests like Killer Mike, Lil Jon and Kid Rock and was a chart and critical success. More track releases, mixtapes and collaborations kept fans occupied after the 2012 announcement of his second Shady Records album, Love Story, which will materialize next year. Yelawolf has been selling out shows all over the country, so you might want to call ahead or show up early.  Vibe recently posted an interview with the MC about his latest goings-on. Check it out here. • Fantastic modern Americana trio The Lone Bellow plays the 20th Century Theater in Oakley tonight. Showtime is 8 p.m. and tickets are $20 at the door. The Lone Bellow broke through with last year’s self-titled debut album and the trio’s forthcoming LP, Then Came the Morning — due January 27 and produced by Cincinnati native/The National guitarist Aaron Dessner — is drawing a lot of buzz already thanks to the release of a pair of singles. Here’s the video for the most recent one, “Fake Roses”: Read Brian Baker’s full preview of tonight’s show from the most recent CityBeat here. Click here for even more live music options tonight in Greater Cincinnati. 
 
 
by Mike Breen 11.18.2014 108 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music at 10:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Music Tonight: Joe Bonamassa, Shaggy and More

Modern Blues/Rock guitar hero Joe Bonamassa might not be a household name, but he has a gigantic fan base. Tonight, many of those fans will fill Music Hall to watch the six-string superstar do his thang. I just drove by Music Hall and he has multiple trucks and busses parked around back, one adorned with the motto, “Always on the Road,” a reference to how he has built such a big following.  Bonamassa does make records, though. His most recent is Different Shades of Blues. Here’s what CityBeat’s Brian Baker had to say about the LP in his preview of the show (click here for the full preview):Bonamassa’s latest album, Different Shades of Blue, is a full-tilt electric experience, kicking off with a brief taste of Jimi Hendrix’s “Hey Baby (New Rising Sun)” — Bonamassa was peeling off Hendrix licks when he was 7 — and roaring into incendiary originals like the scalding “Oh Beautiful,” the funky “Love Ain’t a Love Song,” the relentless “Never Give All Your Heart” and the sinewy title track.  Tonight’s show starts at 8 p.m. Ticket prices range from $79-$125.  • Danish Dance Pop trio New Politics headlines a triple bill of up-and-coming bands playing Bogart’s tonight. The group joins fellow on-the-verge acts Bad Suns and SomeKindaWonderful for the show. New Politics were in town this past summer to play the Bunbury Music Festival, alongside tourmates Paramore and Fall Out Boy. This fall the group teased new material with the release of the single “Everywhere I Go (Kings and Queens).” The group’s next album, Vikings, is slated for release next year. Click here for CityBeat’s full preview of the show. • Reggae crossover star Shaggy plays the Thompson House in Newport tonight. Local band Elementree Livity Project and veteran Columbus, Ohio, squad The Ark Band open the 7 p.m. show. Tickets are $17. Shaggy became a superstar in the ’90s/early ’00s with hits like “Boombastic,” “Angel” and “It Wasn’t Me,” a huge smash (you can still hear it on Pop radio to this day) from his six-times Platinum album, Hot Shot, from 2000. Shaggy has continued to release music and tour the world. Last year, Shaggy released Out of Many, One Music, an all-Reggae album that was produced by the legendary duo Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare.  Click here for more live music options tonight in Greater Cincinnati. 
 
 
by Mike Breen 10.30.2014 127 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Music Video at 09:56 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
reflectioneternal

Music Tonight: Reflection Eternal, Nude Beach and more

The show by Trigger Hippy (featuring Joan Osborne and members of The Black Crowes) scheduled for tonight at Newport’s Southgate House Revival has been postponed due to a death in Osborne’s family. The band is hoping to reschedule the show soon. But there are plenty of other solid live music options in Greater Cincinnati tonight. • One of the best local Hip Hop shows in recent memory at at Rhinegeist in Over-the-Rhine. Reflection Eternal, renowned Cincinnati-based producer/artist Hi-Tek’s collaboration with legendary MC Talib Kweli, headlines the 8 p.m. concert, marking a rare appearance by the duo. The lineup also features Cincinnati heroes Mood, who took Cincy Hip Hop nationwide in the ’90s, Buggs Tha Rocka (who’s prepping a new album release for early December), Trademark Aaron (whose new video for “The Best,” featuring Easy Lantana, recently premiered on Vevo’s home page), Clockworkdj (Mac Miller’s official DJ), Valley High, Eddie Vaughn, Aida Chakra and many others. Tickets are $30 at the door while they last. • Dynamic, groovy and fun rockers Automagik are putting out a limited edition, Halloween-themed EP, Monster Party, for the holiday. The five-track collection features appropriate tracks taken from the group’s two albums. as well as the new title track. The band will have Monster Party available at its show Thursday night at Newport’s Thompson House (purchasers can “name their price”). The 8 p.m. event (with just a $5 cover) also features area acts Dark Colour, Motherfolk, Celestials and Young Colt, plus a live art performance by Kara Mitchell. Costumes are encouraged — those wearing the best ones will be rewarded with a piece of Mitchell’s artwork. Here’s one of the previously released Automagik tracks included on the Monster Party EP: <a href="http://automagikmusic.com/album/black-sundae">Black Sundae by Automagik</a>• Also playing Thompson House tonight (in one of the other rooms) is Jamaican Reggae fave Cocoa Tea. Tea’s fellow countryman Louie Culture also appears, along with soulful Folk/Soul/Jazz/Reggae singer Etana, Cincinnati’s The Cliftones and others. Showtime is 9:30 p.m. and tickets are $25. Cocoa Tea began making waves in the mid-’80s before busting out internationally in the ’90s. Tea scored some major U.S. press in 2008 when he released a song in support of the man who would become our country’s first African American President (in case you’re unclear to whom I’m referring, the song was called “Barack Obama”) and this year he released his 30th LP, Sunset in Negril, on his own Roaring Lion label.  • After adding to their already huge press kit at the recent CMJ festival in New York City, Cincy Trash Pop trio Tweens has been added to the bill at Over-the-Rhine’s The Drinkery tonight, making an already great show even better. The band is joining Brooklyn trio Nude Beach and excellent Cincinnati-based newcomers Leggy. Making infectious, classics-influenced Pop Rock, Nude Beach is touring behind its just released album 77. Here’s the album’s single “For You”:The free show kicks off at 9 p.m.• British rockers You Me at Six play Corryville’s Bogart’s tonight. Doors open at (of course) 6 p.m. The U.K.’s Young Guns and L.A.’s Stars in Stereo open. You Me at Six is beginning to make waves in the States after building a large and loyal fan base in the U.K. The band is currently touring behind its critically acclaimed latest, Cavalier Youth, a big hit in their homeland (it became the group’s first No. 1 album when released early this year). Here’s the video for You Me at Six’s “Room to Breathe”: Click here for even more live music events tonight in the Cincinnati area and feel free to plug any other shows going on tonight in the comments.
 
 

Busdriver with Clipping, Milo, Counterfeit Money Machine, Eugenius and Kenny Segal

Saturday • Thompson House

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 22, 2014
Regan Farquhar’s Hip Hop nom de plume is the rather prosaic Busdriver, but we’re not talking Ralph Kramden’s city vehicle here — more like Ken Kesey’s Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test Metro.  

Mad Anthony Doesn't Wane

Plus, Thompson House offers pre-/post-fireworks live music and ticket prices for the MidPoint Music Festival increase Tuesday

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 27, 2014
Cincinnati rockers Mad Anthony celebrate their first release since last summer's near-fatal van accident, Sank for Days. Plus, the Thompson House in Newport offers live music before and after the Labor Day fireworks show on the river and prices for  three-day passes to the MidPoint Music Festival increase Tuesday.  

The Black Dahlia Murder with Goatwhore, Beverly Hellfire and Apex

Thursday • Thompson House

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 13, 2014
Trying to pin a sound on The Black Dahlia Murder (BDM) is almost as tricky as tracking the band’s membership over the course of its 13-year history.  

The Ragbirds with Box Truck Rescue and Evan Ray

Friday • Thompson House

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 4, 2014
Ann Arbor, Mich., is the nexus for a lot of weird, wonderful musical behavior, and The Ragbirds are another brilliant reminder of that odd harmonic paradigm. Combining elements from a variety of sources — Gypsy Jazz, Celtic Folk, Bluegrass and Rock filtered through Middle Eastern, African and Latin rhythms — the band creates a groove-laden global Roots gumbo.  

The Koffin Kats with Kemper, Formally Lethargic, The Nothing and Shriek

Sunday • Thompson House

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 4, 2013
The Koffin Kats have self-described their musical vision as Gothabilly, and it’s difficult to argue with that effective compound word assessment. A few discerning listens reveal the Detroit trio also exhibits the tattoos of Punk, Metal, Surf, Garage and Psych, and while that could be considered Rock critic nitpicking, there’s no arguing the fact that the Koffin Kats are the raucous and visceral sum of a whole lot of frenetically moving parts.   

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